Date   

Re: Shipping Eggs 100 Years Ago

Brian Termunde
 

Thanks for this tidbit Nolan!

It helps me in several ways. First, I model Raymond / South Bend, Washington State, the Oyster Capital of the world! [And who am I to argue with the local boosters? ] So now instead of just shipping oysters, I can ship oyster shells. Plus, being that I also love the NWP, now I can 'justify' having NWP box cars on my line. They're there to ship shells to Petaluma!

And I enjoyed the movie "The Egg and I" as well. In fact, the actual location where the events that Betty MacDonald (e i e i o?) related took place is not too far north of Willapa Harbor (about 2 hours). I was actually near there just before my ship headed out to the Persian Gulf, but was unaware of it. Dang!

Take Care,
 
Brian R. Termunde
Midvale, Utah


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________________________________________________________________________
3a. Re: Shipping Eggs 100 Years Ago
Posted by: "Nolan Hinshaw" cearnog@... gatepigeon
Date: Tue May 23, 2017 1:33 pm ((PDT))


From: "thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sunday, May 21, 2017 5:31 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Shipping Eggs 100 Years Ago

[photo link elided]

That tickled a minor obsession of mine -- I have several connections with the city of Petaluma California, once known as the egg basket of the US and the topic of the film _The Egg and I_. Petaluma chickens ate feed containing ground oyster shells from which they extracted calcium which they subsequently deposited in their shells, which allowed the eggs to travel by rail to the rest of the country. In about 1915 Petaluma shipped over 143 million chicken eggs to the rest of the US by rail! The connection was mostly via the Petaluma & Santa Rosa and the Espee.

See <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petaluma,_California


Re: Essential Freight Cars

Fred_Swa@...
 

I thought this was replacing the series http://speedwitchmedia.com/prototype-railroad-profiles/  
and that he would be updating some of the previous articles 
Fred Swanson



Re: Shipments: "Military Kraut"

Brian Termunde
 

Well, when I was stationed on Guam 1978-80, I seem to recall swapping "corned beef" for "beef stew" and "peaches" for "pears" during some typhoons while the mess was shut down! It wasn't that much worse then those "hockey pucks" that they often served!

At least aboard ship, we were still served hot meals, even when riding out a typhoon off of the P.I.

Take Care,
 
Brian R. Termunde
Midvale, Utah

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Re: Shipments: "Military Kraut"
Posted by: "Paul Koehler" koehlers@... buygonet
Date: Tue May 23, 2017 4:43 pm ((PDT))

I guess you should have been in Uncle Sam's Canoe Club. We never had them.



Paul C. Koehler


Re: Digest Number 10896

Brian Termunde
 

Well, when I was stationed on Guam 1978-80, I seem to recall swapping "corned beef" for "beef stew" and "peaches" for "pears" during some typhoons while the mess was shut down! It wasn't that much worse then those "hockey pucks" that they often served!

At least aboard ship, we were still served hot meals, even when riding out a typhoon off of the P.I.

Take Care,
 
Brian R. Termunde
Midvale, Utah

******************************************************************************


Re: Shipments: "Military Kraut"
Posted by: "Paul Koehler" koehlers@... buygonet
Date: Tue May 23, 2017 4:43 pm ((PDT))

I guess you should have been in Uncle Sam's Canoe Club. We never had them.



Paul C. Koehler


Re: Can I modify a Type 21 underframe into Type 11?

Rich C
 

Another difference is the tank saddles. I remember that clearly when I was following one of Ted Culotta's tank car kit bash articles. I had a Funaro & Camerlengo Type 11 kit that I borrowed from a club member. I now have my own F&C kits and will compare the underframes when I get a chance.

Rich Christie


On Tuesday, May 23, 2017 5:48 PM, "Ian Cranstone lamontc@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
On 2017-05-23, at 12:36 PM, kemal_mumcu@... [STMFC] wrote:
 
Very helpful indeed Ian. As I model the late '40s this car had a different number and reporting marks than what is currently on the car. Any guess or opinion as to whether the car would have been sporting it's "aluminium" paint job by the '40s?

I wish I had a good answer... there are very few photos of TCLX cars out there, but the few I've seen from later years seem to have been black, likely with white lettering.  I've seen both serif and sans serif lettering, so really can't offer much in the way of useful advice.   It's possible they just patched the reporting mark and number.

Ian Cranstone
Osgoode, Ontario, Canada




Re: Essential Freight Cars

Nelson Moyer
 

 

I too would like to see a reprint in book form, as I was not a subscriber to RMC during most of the years the series covered, however, Ted has stated repeatedly and emphatically that the series would not be offered in book form for whatever reason. Unless he has a change of heart, we’re beating a dead horse.

 

Nelson Moyer


Re: Shipping Eggs 100 Years Ago

Jerry Michels
 

Nolan, Petaluma still has a Butter and Eggs Festival.  Jerry Michels


Re: Shipments: "Military Kraut"

Paul Koehler
 

I guess you should have been in Uncle Sam’s Canoe Club.  We never had them.

 

Paul C. Koehler

 


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, May 23, 2017 3:46 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Shipments: "Military Kraut"

 

 

Dale I bet they had so much warehoused they made units use it up rather than just discard it. How else would you get rid of so many thousands of tons of canned food anyway? Feed it to the GIs of course. LOL Tony Wagner

 

On Tuesday, May 23, 2017 5:39 PM, "dale florence dwwesley@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

 

I was in Germany from 63 to 65, and we had C ration two to three times per year.

 

Dale Florence

 


From: "anthony wagner anycw1@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...>
To: "STMFC@..." <STMFC@...>
Sent: Tuesday, May 23, 2017 6:34 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Shipments: "Military Kraut"

 

 

Anybody remember C rations? When the military bought stuff it was always bought a lot of it and I imagine they bought sauerkraut too. By the car load. When I was in Korea in 1961-2 we still had C rations sometimes that had been packed in 1944. Tony Wagner

 

On Tuesday, May 23, 2017 4:46 PM, "destorzek@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

 

Personally, I would suspect it was loads of shredded cabbage purchased by the Dept. of the Army.

 

Dennis Storzek

 

 

 

 


Re: Shipments: "Military Kraut"

dale florence <dwwesley@...>
 

True



From: "anthony wagner anycw1@... [STMFC]"
To: "STMFC@..."
Sent: Tuesday, May 23, 2017 6:46 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Shipments: "Military Kraut"



Dale I bet they had so much warehoused they made units use it up rather than just discard it. How else would you get rid of so many thousands of tons of canned food anyway? Feed it to the GIs of course. LOL Tony Wagner


On Tuesday, May 23, 2017 5:39 PM, "dale florence dwwesley@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
I was in Germany from 63 to 65, and we had C ration two to three times per year.

Dale Florence



From: "anthony wagner anycw1@... [STMFC]"
To: "STMFC@..."
Sent: Tuesday, May 23, 2017 6:34 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Shipments: "Military Kraut"



Anybody remember C rations? When the military bought stuff it was always bought a lot of it and I imagine they bought sauerkraut too. By the car load. When I was in Korea in 1961-2 we still had C rations sometimes that had been packed in 1944. Tony Wagner


On Tuesday, May 23, 2017 4:46 PM, "destorzek@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Personally, I would suspect it was loads of shredded cabbage purchased by the Dept. of the Army.

Dennis Storzek













Re: Shipping Eggs 100 Years Ago

Eric Bergh
 

FYI, HABS has Scale Drawings and lots of photos of the Alma on their website here; Open in new window.

The SF Maritime National Historic Park is a must-see stop if you ever are in San Francisco! Dedicated staff and volunteers have preserved some truly exceptional vessels. 

My Dad was a Docent and volunteer there in the Small Boat shop for many years...
-Eric


Re: Essential Freight Cars

Don Burn
 

I also would love to see the book, even though I have all the articles. The big question is would Ted want to update the articles?

Don Burn


Re: Can I modify a Type 21 underframe into Type 11?

Ian Cranstone
 

On 2017-05-23, at 12:36 PM, kemal_mumcu@... [STMFC] wrote:
 

Very helpful indeed Ian. As I model the late '40s this car had a different number and reporting marks than what is currently on the car. Any guess or opinion as to whether the car would have been sporting it's "aluminium" paint job by the '40s?


I wish I had a good answer... there are very few photos of TCLX cars out there, but the few I've seen from later years seem to have been black, likely with white lettering.  I've seen both serif and sans serif lettering, so really can't offer much in the way of useful advice.   It's possible they just patched the reporting mark and number.

Ian Cranstone
Osgoode, Ontario, Canada


Re: Essential Freight Cars

gtws00
 

I would also buy the book.
George Toman


Re: Shipments: "Military Kraut"

anthony wagner
 

Dale I bet they had so much warehoused they made units use it up rather than just discard it. How else would you get rid of so many thousands of tons of canned food anyway? Feed it to the GIs of course. LOL Tony Wagner


On Tuesday, May 23, 2017 5:39 PM, "dale florence dwwesley@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
I was in Germany from 63 to 65, and we had C ration two to three times per year.

Dale Florence



From: "anthony wagner anycw1@... [STMFC]"
To: "STMFC@..."
Sent: Tuesday, May 23, 2017 6:34 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Shipments: "Military Kraut"



Anybody remember C rations? When the military bought stuff it was always bought a lot of it and I imagine they bought sauerkraut too. By the car load. When I was in Korea in 1961-2 we still had C rations sometimes that had been packed in 1944. Tony Wagner


On Tuesday, May 23, 2017 4:46 PM, "destorzek@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Personally, I would suspect it was loads of shredded cabbage purchased by the Dept. of the Army.

Dennis Storzek









Re: Shipments: "Military Kraut"

dale florence <dwwesley@...>
 

I was in Germany from 63 to 65, and we had C ration two to three times per year.

Dale Florence



From: "anthony wagner anycw1@... [STMFC]"
To: "STMFC@..."
Sent: Tuesday, May 23, 2017 6:34 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Shipments: "Military Kraut"



Anybody remember C rations? When the military bought stuff it was always bought a lot of it and I imagine they bought sauerkraut too. By the car load. When I was in Korea in 1961-2 we still had C rations sometimes that had been packed in 1944. Tony Wagner


On Tuesday, May 23, 2017 4:46 PM, "destorzek@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Personally, I would suspect it was loads of shredded cabbage purchased by the Dept. of the Army.

Dennis Storzek







Re: Shipping Eggs 100 Years Ago

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Friends,

We might be getting off topic here, but Alma is the last of the scow-schooners which once carried freight all around San Francisco Bay and the estuaries. These boats had squared-off prows and a very shallow draft.

Yours Aye,

Garth Groff

On 5/23/17 2:33 PM, Nolan Hinshaw cearnog@... [STMFC] wrote:
 


From: "thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sunday, May 21, 2017 5:31 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Shipping Eggs 100 Years Ago

[photo link elided]

That tickled a minor obsession of mine -- I have several connections with the city of Petaluma California, once known as the egg basket of the US and the topic of the film _The Egg and I_. Petaluma chickens ate feed containing ground oyster shells from which they extracted calcium which they subsequently deposited in their shells, which allowed the eggs to travel by rail to the rest of the country. In about 1915 Petaluma shipped over 143 million chicken eggs to the rest of the US by rail! The connection was mostly via the Petaluma & Santa Rosa and the Espee.

See
and note in particular the reference to the scow schooner Alma, currently a national historic landmark sailing out of the only floating national park in the US, San Francisco maritime National Historical Park -- this is my main connection to Petaluma, as we sail it there for a three night stay every October.
--
Nolan Hinshaw, San Francisco
"Not only is it not right, it's not even wrong!"
>From Wolfgang Pauli, perpetrator of the Pauli Exclusion Principle



Re: Shipments: "Military Kraut"

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Bob,

I agree with Jon. My parents told me a story from Iowa about this. German POWs held at a camp there were allowed to make some of their food to their taste. They made tons of kraut, then were shipped out to some other prison camp and had to leave their food behind. Next came the Japanese, who were ordered to eat the left-over German kraut. They objected (having their own taste in pickled foods), but to no avail. They were forced to eat the kraut before food more to their taste was allowed.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff


On 5/23/17 2:49 PM, Jon Miller atsfus@... [STMFC] wrote:
 

On 5/23/2017 10:31 AM, thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] wrote:
(one boxcar and three reefers).

    I think this was for consumption.  You don't need 4 car loads for analysis and reverse engineering.  Also Kraut might have been a normal term at that time, I don't know.  I do know that even as a child I called it Kraut and my ancestors came here in the early 1700s!

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: Shipments: "Military Kraut"

anthony wagner
 

Anybody remember C rations? When the military bought stuff it was always bought a lot of it and I imagine they bought sauerkraut too. By the car load. When I was in Korea in 1961-2 we still had C rations sometimes that had been packed in 1944. Tony Wagner


On Tuesday, May 23, 2017 4:46 PM, "destorzek@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Personally, I would suspect it was loads of shredded cabbage purchased by the Dept. of the Army.

Dennis Storzek



Re: PFE/WP Reefers: Color of Feather (Orange or Silver)?

Bruce Smith
 

Bill,

As I noted, these cars were freely distributed within the PFE fleet and their routing was not controlled by WP.  As a consequence, they would be seen wherever PFE cars would be seen.  Since the ratio of cars between PFE and WP is important to know.  Prior to WWII the ratio would be 36,000 to 2,775 or about 13:1  That ratio gets worse after WWII when many of WP’s cars were falling apart and being retired.  What that means is that you need to have about 15-20 PFE cars to justify ONE WP car ;)  I’m just about at that point.

As excellent reading on this, I suggest Tony Thompson’s blog:

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



On May 23, 2017, at 2:44 PM, bill stanton bill_stanton60@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:



thanks to all for the info...although i said silver, upon closer inspection the rtr was all black and white (like the photo you provided)

btw, would these have been seen in southern california ca. 1947?



From: STMFC@... <STMFC@...> on behalf of 'Bruce F. Smith' smithbf@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
Sent: Monday, May 22, 2017 6:12 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] PFE/WP Reefers: Color of Feather (Orange or Silver)?
 

Bill,

When in doubt I refer to the gospels according to Thompson, Church and Jones (aka, the PFE "bible").  As I read them, technically, neither silver nor orange are correct for the feather.  The book states that the herald was always white on black.  Additionally, I have only identified cars that match that description in every online photo I can find.  For example: http://lariverrailroads.com/reefer/pfe55589.jpg


I'd go with the  one you think as "silver" as the most correct.  Of course that doesn't make the other car wrong, since RC had a fondness for experimental paint schemes.  However, given the paucity of the WP cars within the PFE fleet and the fact that they were freely distributed within that fleet, modeling the oddity is probably not the best approach.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

From: STMFC@... <STMFC@...> on behalf of bill_stanton60@...[STMFC] <STMFC@...>
Sent: Monday, May 22, 2017 2:23 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] PFE/WP Reefers: Color of Feather (Orange or Silver)?
 


I have a red caboose kit r-30-12 pfe/wp reefer with feather in WP logo as orange but I've seen a red caboose RTR with the feather as silver.

Can anyone explain which is correct?

(I'm modeling 1947-48)

thanks






Re: Essential Freight Cars

Michael Gross
 

I’d be onboard for that book!!!

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