Date   
Re: Essential Freight Cars

Tom Madden
 

I know there are several indexes to Ted's Essential Freight Cars articles already in the STMFC Files area, but I've just uploaded another one. It includes sidebars and tables. If it turns out to be redundant I'll remove it.


https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/STMFC/files/Culotta%20ESF%20Index.xls


Tom Madden

New file uploaded to STMFC

STMFC@...
 

Hello,


This email message is a notification to let you know that
a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the STMFC
group.


File : /Culotta ESF Index.xls
Uploaded by : pullmanboss <pullmanboss@...>
Description : Index to Ted Culotta's RMC Essential Freight Cars articles, including sidebars and tables


You can access this file at the URL:
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/STMFC/files/Culotta%20ESF%20Index.xls


To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit:
https://help.yahoo.com/kb/index?page=content&y=PROD_GRPS&locale=en_US&id=SLN15398


Regards,


pullmanboss <pullmanboss@...>

Re: Essential Freight Cars

Alexander Schneider Jr
 

Wish I had seen this before replying to an earlier post. I’m delighted it’s in the queue!

 

Alex Schneider

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, May 24, 2017 8:36 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Essential Freight Cars

 




I guess it's time that I reply to this. First, I do not ever recall stating that I would not entertain the idea of consolidating all of this into a book. It's possible I did, but I certainly don't remember it. However, I have read numerous times about things I have said and done that were not the case so it's possible that I stated something that was easily interpreted differently than I intended.

 

That said, I have discussed the idea of doing a book, although books is more realistic. My vision is 3-4 perfect bound (paperback) volumes.

 

The fly in the ointment in all of this is that a lot has changed since these articles were published. Many of the kits are no longer available, many have been superseded by one or more styrene (or resin) offerings, and several are ones where I (or others) are actively pursuing replacement kit offerings. I also have several subjects that were never covered that would need to be completed and incorporated into a latter part of the compendium. It's not that I don't see a value in this; it's more that it would be an undertaking well above and beyond just putting them together into book form.

 

To summarize, it's a project I heartily embrace. I just need to insert it into the queue.

 

Thanks for all of the positive input, feedback, and support. It is nice to read it all.

 

Cheers,

Ted





Re: Essential Freight Cars

Alexander Schneider Jr
 

Almost a decade has passed since the series ended, and some of the kits recommended to realize the essential freight cars are no longer available. While many of us would like to complete our collections of a series we think highly of, Ted would need to invest many hours in an update to make a mainstream, current reference book. My impression is that he’s moved to other projects more directed at freight car history than modeling.

Many installments are actually two articles: the main article about the particular car, and a sidebar about a particular construction detail which is applicable to many cars. The latter are not spelled out in the index I saw online a few months ago, and I hope to compile it and make it available over the summer.

Alex Schneider

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, May 24, 2017 5:24 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Essential Freight Cars







---In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC@...> , <npmoyer@... <mailto:npmoyer@...> > wrote :

I too would like to see a reprint in book form, as I was not a subscriber to RMC during most of the years the series covered, however, Ted has stated repeatedly and emphatically that the series would not be offered in book form for whatever reason. Unless he has a change of heart, we’re beating a dead horse.

Nelson Moyer


Some of us will have an opportunity to beat that dead horse on 2 & 3 June at the New England RPM Meet.
I will speak quietly with Ted about it as I am certainly one of those who feel all the articles would be more useful if presented all together in one book. There may be some copyright issues but even those could probably be addressed if Ted were to have White River Pub. actually do the printing and distribution of such a book.

Cordially, Don Valentine

Re: Essential Freight Cars

Ted Culotta
 

I guess it's time that I reply to this. First, I do not ever recall stating that I would not entertain the idea of consolidating all of this into a book. It's possible I did, but I certainly don't remember it. However, I have read numerous times about things I have said and done that were not the case so it's possible that I stated something that was easily interpreted differently than I intended.

That said, I have discussed the idea of doing a book, although books is more realistic. My vision is 3-4 perfect bound (paperback) volumes.

The fly in the ointment in all of this is that a lot has changed since these articles were published. Many of the kits are no longer available, many have been superseded by one or more styrene (or resin) offerings, and several are ones where I (or others) are actively pursuing replacement kit offerings. I also have several subjects that were never covered that would need to be completed and incorporated into a latter part of the compendium. It's not that I don't see a value in this; it's more that it would be an undertaking well above and beyond just putting them together into book form.

To summarize, it's a project I heartily embrace. I just need to insert it into the queue.

Thanks for all of the positive input, feedback, and support. It is nice to read it all.

Cheers,
Ted

Re: Essential Freight Cars

Donald B. Valentine
 



---In STMFC@..., <npmoyer@...> wrote :

 

I too would like to see a reprint in book form, as I was not a subscriber to RMC during most of the years the series covered, however, Ted has stated repeatedly and emphatically that the series would not be offered in book form for whatever reason. Unless he has a change of heart, we’re beating a dead horse.

 

Nelson Moyer 



Some of us will have an opportunity to beat that dead horse on 2 & 3 June at the New England RPM Meet.

I will speak quietly with Ted about it as I am certainly one of those who feel all the articles would be more useful if presented all together in one book. There may be some copyright issues but even those could probably be addressed if Ted were to have White River Pub. actually do the printing and distribution of such a book.


Cordially, Don Valentine

Re: Shipping Eggs 100 Years Ago

Brad Andonian
 

Brian,

Perhaps you can add winlock, wa?   Home of the world largest egg and at one time a large poultry raising area.....  winlock is south of Raymond in Lewis county.

I would like to hear more about your layout.

Brad Andonian
Due north in Seattle 


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Tuesday, May 23, 2017, 6:57 PM, Brian Termunde GCRDS@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Thanks for this tidbit Nolan!

It helps me in several ways. First, I model Raymond / South Bend, Washington State, the Oyster Capital of the world! [And who am I to argue with the local boosters? ] So now instead of just shipping oysters, I can ship oyster shells. Plus, being that I also love the NWP, now I can 'justify' having NWP box cars on my line. They're there to ship shells to Petaluma!

And I enjoyed the movie "The Egg and I" as well. In fact, the actual location where the events that Betty MacDonald (e i e i o?) related took place is not too far north of Willapa Harbor (about 2 hours). I was actually near there just before my ship headed out to the Persian Gulf, but was unaware of it. Dang!

Take Care,
 
Brian R. Termunde
Midvale, Utah


******************************************************************************

________________________________________________________________________
3a. Re: Shipping Eggs 100 Years Ago
Posted by: "Nolan Hinshaw" cearnog@... gatepigeon
Date: Tue May 23, 2017 1:33 pm ((PDT))


From: "thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sunday, May 21, 2017 5:31 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Shipping Eggs 100 Years Ago

[photo link elided]

That tickled a minor obsession of mine -- I have several connections with the city of Petaluma California, once known as the egg basket of the US and the topic of the film _The Egg and I_. Petaluma chickens ate feed containing ground oyster shells from which they extracted calcium which they subsequently deposited in their shells, which allowed the eggs to travel by rail to the rest of the country. In about 1915 Petaluma shipped over 143 million chicken eggs to the rest of the US by rail! The connection was mostly via the Petaluma & Santa Rosa and the Espee.

See <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petaluma,_California

Re: Shipments: "Military Kraut"

Douglas Harding
 

Years ago I had a church member whose family had a truck farm near Muscatine IA. During WWII they sold cabbage for the US Army, which were shipped in gunny sacks in box cars. He remembered how the picking crews had to relearn how to sew the burlap bags closed, as the Army had a different way. It is quite possible some of those cabbages went on to make sauerkraut. To get us back on track, so to speak, the railroads that served Muscatine were the Milwaukee and the Rock Island.

 

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, May 23, 2017 5:35 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Shipments: "Military Kraut"

 

 

Bob,

I agree with Jon. My parents told me a story from Iowa about this. German POWs held at a camp there were allowed to make some of their food to their taste. They made tons of kraut, then were shipped out to some other prison camp and had to leave their food behind. Next came the Japanese, who were ordered to eat the left-over German kraut. They objected (having their own taste in pickled foods), but to no avail. They were forced to eat the kraut before food more to their taste was allowed.

Yours Aye,

 

Garth Groff

 

On 5/23/17 2:49 PM, Jon Miller atsfus@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

On 5/23/2017 10:31 AM, thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] wrote:

(one boxcar and three reefers).

    I think this was for consumption.  You don't need 4 car loads for analysis and reverse engineering.  Also Kraut might have been a normal term at that time, I don't know.  I do know that even as a child I called it Kraut and my ancestors came here in the early 1700s!

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS

 

Re: Essential Freight Cars

Spen Kellogg <spninetynine@...>
 

Me too.

Spen Kellogg

Re: Shipping Eggs 100 Years Ago

Brian Termunde
 

Thanks for this tidbit Nolan!

It helps me in several ways. First, I model Raymond / South Bend, Washington State, the Oyster Capital of the world! [And who am I to argue with the local boosters? ] So now instead of just shipping oysters, I can ship oyster shells. Plus, being that I also love the NWP, now I can 'justify' having NWP box cars on my line. They're there to ship shells to Petaluma!

And I enjoyed the movie "The Egg and I" as well. In fact, the actual location where the events that Betty MacDonald (e i e i o?) related took place is not too far north of Willapa Harbor (about 2 hours). I was actually near there just before my ship headed out to the Persian Gulf, but was unaware of it. Dang!

Take Care,
 
Brian R. Termunde
Midvale, Utah


******************************************************************************

________________________________________________________________________
3a. Re: Shipping Eggs 100 Years Ago
Posted by: "Nolan Hinshaw" cearnog@... gatepigeon
Date: Tue May 23, 2017 1:33 pm ((PDT))


From: "thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sunday, May 21, 2017 5:31 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Shipping Eggs 100 Years Ago

[photo link elided]

That tickled a minor obsession of mine -- I have several connections with the city of Petaluma California, once known as the egg basket of the US and the topic of the film _The Egg and I_. Petaluma chickens ate feed containing ground oyster shells from which they extracted calcium which they subsequently deposited in their shells, which allowed the eggs to travel by rail to the rest of the country. In about 1915 Petaluma shipped over 143 million chicken eggs to the rest of the US by rail! The connection was mostly via the Petaluma & Santa Rosa and the Espee.

See <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petaluma,_California

Re: Essential Freight Cars

Fred_Swa@...
 

I thought this was replacing the series http://speedwitchmedia.com/prototype-railroad-profiles/  
and that he would be updating some of the previous articles 
Fred Swanson


Re: Shipments: "Military Kraut"

Brian Termunde
 

Well, when I was stationed on Guam 1978-80, I seem to recall swapping "corned beef" for "beef stew" and "peaches" for "pears" during some typhoons while the mess was shut down! It wasn't that much worse then those "hockey pucks" that they often served!

At least aboard ship, we were still served hot meals, even when riding out a typhoon off of the P.I.

Take Care,
 
Brian R. Termunde
Midvale, Utah

******************************************************************************


Re: Shipments: "Military Kraut"
Posted by: "Paul Koehler" koehlers@... buygonet
Date: Tue May 23, 2017 4:43 pm ((PDT))

I guess you should have been in Uncle Sam's Canoe Club. We never had them.



Paul C. Koehler

Re: Digest Number 10896

Brian Termunde
 

Well, when I was stationed on Guam 1978-80, I seem to recall swapping "corned beef" for "beef stew" and "peaches" for "pears" during some typhoons while the mess was shut down! It wasn't that much worse then those "hockey pucks" that they often served!

At least aboard ship, we were still served hot meals, even when riding out a typhoon off of the P.I.

Take Care,
 
Brian R. Termunde
Midvale, Utah

******************************************************************************


Re: Shipments: "Military Kraut"
Posted by: "Paul Koehler" koehlers@... buygonet
Date: Tue May 23, 2017 4:43 pm ((PDT))

I guess you should have been in Uncle Sam's Canoe Club. We never had them.



Paul C. Koehler

Re: Can I modify a Type 21 underframe into Type 11?

Rich C
 

Another difference is the tank saddles. I remember that clearly when I was following one of Ted Culotta's tank car kit bash articles. I had a Funaro & Camerlengo Type 11 kit that I borrowed from a club member. I now have my own F&C kits and will compare the underframes when I get a chance.

Rich Christie


On Tuesday, May 23, 2017 5:48 PM, "Ian Cranstone lamontc@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
On 2017-05-23, at 12:36 PM, kemal_mumcu@... [STMFC] wrote:
 
Very helpful indeed Ian. As I model the late '40s this car had a different number and reporting marks than what is currently on the car. Any guess or opinion as to whether the car would have been sporting it's "aluminium" paint job by the '40s?

I wish I had a good answer... there are very few photos of TCLX cars out there, but the few I've seen from later years seem to have been black, likely with white lettering.  I've seen both serif and sans serif lettering, so really can't offer much in the way of useful advice.   It's possible they just patched the reporting mark and number.

Ian Cranstone
Osgoode, Ontario, Canada



Re: Essential Freight Cars

Nelson Moyer
 

 

I too would like to see a reprint in book form, as I was not a subscriber to RMC during most of the years the series covered, however, Ted has stated repeatedly and emphatically that the series would not be offered in book form for whatever reason. Unless he has a change of heart, we’re beating a dead horse.

 

Nelson Moyer

Re: Shipping Eggs 100 Years Ago

Jerry Michels
 

Nolan, Petaluma still has a Butter and Eggs Festival.  Jerry Michels

Re: Shipments: "Military Kraut"

Paul Koehler
 

I guess you should have been in Uncle Sam’s Canoe Club.  We never had them.

 

Paul C. Koehler

 


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, May 23, 2017 3:46 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Shipments: "Military Kraut"

 

 

Dale I bet they had so much warehoused they made units use it up rather than just discard it. How else would you get rid of so many thousands of tons of canned food anyway? Feed it to the GIs of course. LOL Tony Wagner

 

On Tuesday, May 23, 2017 5:39 PM, "dale florence dwwesley@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

 

I was in Germany from 63 to 65, and we had C ration two to three times per year.

 

Dale Florence

 


From: "anthony wagner anycw1@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...>
To: "STMFC@..." <STMFC@...>
Sent: Tuesday, May 23, 2017 6:34 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Shipments: "Military Kraut"

 

 

Anybody remember C rations? When the military bought stuff it was always bought a lot of it and I imagine they bought sauerkraut too. By the car load. When I was in Korea in 1961-2 we still had C rations sometimes that had been packed in 1944. Tony Wagner

 

On Tuesday, May 23, 2017 4:46 PM, "destorzek@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

 

Personally, I would suspect it was loads of shredded cabbage purchased by the Dept. of the Army.

 

Dennis Storzek

 

 

 

 

Re: Shipments: "Military Kraut"

dale florence <dwwesley@...>
 

True



From: "anthony wagner anycw1@... [STMFC]"
To: "STMFC@..."
Sent: Tuesday, May 23, 2017 6:46 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Shipments: "Military Kraut"



Dale I bet they had so much warehoused they made units use it up rather than just discard it. How else would you get rid of so many thousands of tons of canned food anyway? Feed it to the GIs of course. LOL Tony Wagner


On Tuesday, May 23, 2017 5:39 PM, "dale florence dwwesley@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
I was in Germany from 63 to 65, and we had C ration two to three times per year.

Dale Florence



From: "anthony wagner anycw1@... [STMFC]"
To: "STMFC@..."
Sent: Tuesday, May 23, 2017 6:34 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Shipments: "Military Kraut"



Anybody remember C rations? When the military bought stuff it was always bought a lot of it and I imagine they bought sauerkraut too. By the car load. When I was in Korea in 1961-2 we still had C rations sometimes that had been packed in 1944. Tony Wagner


On Tuesday, May 23, 2017 4:46 PM, "destorzek@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Personally, I would suspect it was loads of shredded cabbage purchased by the Dept. of the Army.

Dennis Storzek












Re: Shipping Eggs 100 Years Ago

Eric Bergh
 

FYI, HABS has Scale Drawings and lots of photos of the Alma on their website here; Open in new window.

The SF Maritime National Historic Park is a must-see stop if you ever are in San Francisco! Dedicated staff and volunteers have preserved some truly exceptional vessels. 

My Dad was a Docent and volunteer there in the Small Boat shop for many years...
-Eric

Re: Essential Freight Cars

Don Burn
 

I also would love to see the book, even though I have all the articles. The big question is would Ted want to update the articles?

Don Burn