Date   

Railfanning from the skies

Eric Hansmann
 

On a recent flight, I snapped a photo of a B&O location on the Ohio River. That image and notes on the railroad are featured in the latest DesignBuildOp blog post.

 

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/2017/05/26/from-the-air/

 

 

 

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX


Re: USRA Andrews truck plans

SUVCWORR@...
 

Paul,

Here is a link to the PRR drawing of the USRA freight truck  it is a side view not sure if it will help you

http://prr.railfan.net/diagrams/PRRdiagrams.html?diag=2D-F3-E69407.gif&sel=ftk&sz=sm&fr=

Rich Orr


-----Original Message-----
From: paulandclaire@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Fri, May 26, 2017 3:30 am
Subject: [STMFC] USRA Andrews truck plans



Hi Folks

Could someone please advise where best to look for scale drawings of the USRA standard Andrews truck?  Is there a book available for purchase which happens to have good engineering drawings of it, perhaps?  I have downloaded all car builders' cyclopedias from 1903 up to 1922 but while there are drawings of several different Andrews trucks, the USRA version is not among them as far as I can see.  I have plain side-views from various model railroad publications but they are lacking in detail, and for not having an end-view are not of much use at all.  Any help gratefully received.  Living as far from the USA as I do, it's not easy to gain access to many sources of information.

I recently decided to go garden-railroading after a health scare made me realise that waiting for my hoped-for indoor space for an O-scale railroad to become available might result in me achieving precisely zip before I shuffle off....open-heart surg ery makes you rethink a lot of things!  However, upon looking around for 1/32 scale supplies, I find there is almost nothing commercially available so I am trying to create some 3D-printed 1/32 scale trucks for myself, starting with the most common.  Fortunately I have good plans of the Bettendorf T-section to work on while I hunt for drawings of the Andrews truck.

Regards
Paul Woods

Whangarei, NZ.





Re: USRA Andrews truck plans

Dave Parker
 

The "cleanest" copy of the USRA drawings (including the trucks) that I have found is the U Michigan scan of Railway Mechanical Engineer, April 1918 (vol 92, vol 4), page 189.

It can be accessed here, and downloaded for free in a variety of formats:




Dave Parker
Riverside, CA


On Friday, May 26, 2017 7:27 AM, "destorzek@... [STMFC]" wrote:



Re: USRA Andrews truck plans

Dennis Storzek
 


Re: X29B as a stand in?

Benjamin Hom
 

Ben Scanlon asked:
"There is a good TT scale 3-D print of the PRR X29B boxcar and I am wondering if any other railroads had a very similar car that an X29B print could be used as a stand in for?  

The combination of features that I can identify: diagonal panel roof, R-3-4 end, 10 panel sides, 7' door, straight side sills."

Normally, I'd counsel against using a rebuild to model similar cars, but in the case of the late rebuilds such as PRR Class X29B, that's not the case.  Because these cars are essentially postwar AAR boxcar bodies, you can modify this model to represent postwar AAR boxcars by cutting off the recessed side sill of the rebuild, adding in the side sill of the prototype you're trying to match, and swap out an AAR boxcar underframe.

As for other rebuilds, the 7 ft door opening kind of takes it out of contention.  Later ATSF Class Bx-49 rebuilds might be in the neighborhood (I'm not sure if they switched over from rectangular panel to diagonal panel roofs during the rebuilding program) and the KCS USRA DS rebuilds (done for an early Cocoa Beach Shake N Take) are similar, but both have 6 ft door openings.  Here's a capsule summary of the Santa Fe cars:


Ben Hom



Re: Essential Freight Cars

Clark Propst
 

How about an E-book? Make the articles available as a package on-line?
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: USRA Andrews truck plans

Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <paulandclaire@...> wrote :

Hi Scott

Very good point.  I believe that there was a particular design that was selected by the USRA committee, so even if it was produced by several different manufacturers, the trucks nevertheless looked very similar.
========================

More than just selected by the committee, actually purchased. So, whatever sideframe design they purchased is truly the "USRA Andrews truck."

Most of the committee's work was presented in the 1919 edition of the Car Builder's Dictionary; I know drawings of the truck and bolster designs were. This reference is available on-line. I have the link bookmarked at work and will post it later.

Dennis Storzek 


Re: USRA Andrews truck plans

Woody of Whangas
 

Hi Scott

Very good point.  I believe that there was a particular design that was selected by the USRA committee, so even if it was produced by several different manufacturers, the trucks nevertheless looked very similar.  I have seen it referred to time and again as a 'USRA Andrews truck'.  The sideframe is quite recognisable, having an almost straight top edge, with a pronounced round-down at the ends and a short 'shelf' at the extreme ends above the axle boxes with the bolt-head that resided there being in plain view.

Many other versions of Andrews trucks had a more visibly rounded top edge, and often no shelf at the ends, the downward curve of the sideframe's top edge carried on right to the extreme ends with the bolt-head being concealed in a recess.  I will upload some photos to my folder to illustrate the differences tomorrow.

Regards
Paul Woods

Whangarei, NZ


Re: USRA Andrews truck plans

Scott H. Haycock
 

I am no expert on truck design or manufacture, but what I have gleaned over the years, when a question like this comes up, is that a concept design, like the "Andrews truck" is a patented design. I believe Richard tried to make this point more than once. Several manufacturers built trucks that were licensed, and conformed to the specifics of the patent, but were otherwise made to the manufacturer's own design. That's why there are variations in truck appearance,  that we modelers tend to lump under one name.

Based on this assumption, I'm not sure that the idea of a USRA standard Andrews truck is valid.


If I'm wrong about this, I invite more expert clarity .

Scott Haycock


 

Hi Folks


Could someone please advise where best to look for scale drawings of the USRA standard Andrews truck?  Is there a book available for purchase which happens to have good engineeringdifferent  drawings of it, perhaps?  I have downloaded all car builders' cyclopedias from 1903 up to 1922 but while there are drawings of several different Andrews trucks, the USRA version is not among them as far as I can see.  I have plain side-views from various model railroad publications but they are lacking in detail, and for not having an end-view are not of much use at all.  Any help gratefully received.  Living as far from the USA as I do, it's not easy to gain access to many sources of information.


I recently decided to go garden-railroading after a health scare made me realise that waiting for my hoped-for indoor space for an O-scale railroad to become available might result in me achieving precisely zip before I shuffle off....open-heart surgery makes you rethink a lot of things!  However, upon looking around for 1/32 scale supplies, I find there is almost nothing commercially available so I am trying to create some 3D-printed 1/32 scale trucks for myself, starting with the most common.  Fortunately I have good plans of the Bettendorf T-section to work on while I hunt for drawings of the Andrews truck.


Regards
Paul Woods


Whangarei, NZ.





X29B as a stand in?

Benjamin Scanlon
 

There is a good TT scale 3-D print of the PRR X29B boxcar and I am wondering if any other railroads had a very similar car that an X29B print could be used as a stand in for?  


The combination of features that I can identify: diagonal panel roof, R-3-4 end, 10 panel sides, 7' door, straight side sills. 


Regards,


Ben Scanlon

London, England


USRA Andrews truck plans

Woody of Whangas
 

Hi Folks

Could someone please advise where best to look for scale drawings of the USRA standard Andrews truck?  Is there a book available for purchase which happens to have good engineering drawings of it, perhaps?  I have downloaded all car builders' cyclopedias from 1903 up to 1922 but while there are drawings of several different Andrews trucks, the USRA version is not among them as far as I can see.  I have plain side-views from various model railroad publications but they are lacking in detail, and for not having an end-view are not of much use at all.  Any help gratefully received.  Living as far from the USA as I do, it's not easy to gain access to many sources of information.

I recently decided to go garden-railroading after a health scare made me realise that waiting for my hoped-for indoor space for an O-scale railroad to become available might result in me achieving precisely zip before I shuffle off....open-heart surgery makes you rethink a lot of things!  However, upon looking around for 1/32 scale supplies, I find there is almost nothing commercially available so I am trying to create some 3D-printed 1/32 scale trucks for myself, starting with the most common.  Fortunately I have good plans of the Bettendorf T-section to work on while I hunt for drawings of the Andrews truck.

Regards
Paul Woods

Whangarei, NZ.



Re: B&O W-2 Hopper Door Locks

rwitt_2000
 

Dave,

There were drawing for the B&O W-2a published in the Car Builders' Cyclopedia from the 1928 edition forward. Some editions are available as Train Shed reprints. The drawing is small and probably doesn't show the detail you desire. Unfortunately the B&O equipment diagrams don't list the parts used on their freight cars such as trucks, brakes, etc. or in this case the door locking mechanism.

The Pullman Library should have drawings for those built by Standard Steel Car, but only by visiting and digging would one find if sub-drawings that may include the door locks are in their collection.

Regards,

Bob Witt


B&O W-2 Hopper Door Locks

Dave Parker
 

Is anybody aware of, or does anybody have, a mechanical drawing of the W-2 door locks that Ed Hawkins aptly termed "simplistic" in RPCyc 5?

Thanks in advance for any assistance.

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA



Reading XMv

Scott
 

Does anybody happen to know the ladder spacing on the XMv boxcar? I have a couple of F & C kits that I need to order some ladders for so I can get going on them.

Thanks
Scott McDonald


Re: Essential Freight Cars

Tony Thompson
 

      I completely understand Ted's feeling that some of the modeling background for the series deserves correction, such as kits no longer manufactured, and perhaps some techniques he has improved in subsequent years. But the biggest value for many of us was the combination of prototype information (analysis as well as factual material) and the very fine modeling techniques. I think some of Ted's reaction to the articles in hindsight can be termed (paraphrasing Paul Weiss) "Author Flaw Perception," in which even a small blemish of fact or description is enlarged in the author's mind to such an extent that it obscures the excellence of the bulk of the article. 
       Updating or extending the articles is an admirable goal, and I certainly would not want to discourage Ted from doing so. But I would not want that goal to overwhelm the project. Here are suggestions of ways to do so in a book. A simple way might be to present the article as originally published, and add a "followup" or addendum with commentary on things that might be done differently today, or mention that a particular kit might have to be sought on eBay, etc. Some articles, I'm sure, would need less of this than others. 
       I can understand Ted's dismay at the thought of completely re-doing all 45 of the articles and perhaps even having to build new model versions, but I would urge him NOT to approach it that way. There is immense value in what was already published, and I think many of us would be delighted even with simply the original articles in book form. Adding update comments to each would increase the value further.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: Essential Freight Cars

Mikebrock
 

Brian R. Termunde writes:

 

It was very politely pointed out to me to my that my comment about "modelers" was not clear enough, and so if I inadvertently offended anyone else, I most sincerely apologize! That was most certainly not my intention.

 

As I mentioned to the gentleman who contacted me offlist about my post, ….”

 

While it is probably not needed, I think I will respond to this message. Obviously, anyone can comment about virtually anything Offgroup [ not on the STMFC ] However, no member need apologize to another member regarding a message sent on the STMFC. In fact, the STMFC does not allow members to criticize others ON the STMFC.

 

As I have said before, the only armed members sitting at the table are STMFC mgt…myself and Jeff Aley.

 

Mike Brock

STMFC Owner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Re: DO NOT HUMP: FGEX Double Deck Refrigerator

Bill Welch
 

Several hundred ex-PRR reefers were rebuilt with new larger superstructures. Some had FGEX reporting marks and others had collapsable decking and carried FDEX reporting marks. I do not know why but they all seemed to have had eight door hinges instead of six.


Bill Welch


Re: Help with C&EI FGE insulated box cars

Bill Welch
 

David:

Although dated now this PDF  will answer some of your questions I think. Look first on page 15: http://s-clmodeler.aclsal.org/currentissue/fgexwoodencars.pdf

During the time period of this group no RR including the C&EI would have leased cars from FGE but would have been furnished cars if the had a contract w/FGE for cars. The C&EI was one of the first RR's to become an owner of FGE, eventually numbering 16 RR's. All of the owner RR's had contracts for both cars and protective service.

Bill Welch



Re: Essential Freight Cars

Brian Termunde
 

It was very politely pointed out to me to my that my comment about "modelers" was not clear enough, and so if I inadvertently offended anyone else, I most sincerely apologize! That was most certainly not my intention.

As I mentioned to the gentleman who contacted me offlist about my post, I feel that one of the best things about the hobby of Model Railroading is that there are SO many aspects to our hobby. How one chooses what (or what chooses them) interests them varies, and that variety in our hobby, I feel, is one of its greatest strengths.

My use of the word "modeler", even with my poor attempt at defining in what specific context I meant it, was not intended to exclude or belittle (not quite the word I desire, but hopefully it's understood in the spirit I intend it) other aspects of the hobby.

Modeling in our hobby takes many forms, and I'm happy to say that I enjoy most all of them (wiring, I think, is only one I do NOT enjoy, but fortunately, there are many of those who do, and thank you!).

Respectfully,
 
Brian R. Termunde
Midvale, Utah


Re: Essential Freight Cars

Dave Nelson
 

Reply with in-line comments, prefixed with [DHN>]  

 

From: Pat Duffin]


What I have heard is that we are looking for a book.

 

[DHN>]  The media isn’t very important, but the information is.  Scale isn’t very important, but the information is.  Just do it Ted.

 

Dave Nelson

 



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