Date   

Re: B&O M-26B Cross Ties

Bill Welch
 

Under the door posts meaning under the edge of the door opening

On the X29 the cross ties are under the door opening

Those rivets we see inline about where the door stops are where the Cross Bearers are attached to the side sill.

Bill Welch


Re: Eggs served rubbery.

Jon Miller <atsfus@...>
 

On 6/1/2017 8:34 PM, destorzek@... [STMFC] wrote:
Eggs were dipped in an aqueous solution of sodium silicate which dried

I made a comment about this back in the eggs thread.  However I used the term "water glass".  For the younger group "water glass" was used to simulate water back in the early days of model railroading.

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: B&O M-26B Cross Ties

rwitt_2000
 

Bill,

If I am not sure what you mean by" "under the doors" vs. under the door posts.

Photographic evidence based upon  the location of rivets on the side sills show that the B&O had its cross ties or cross bearers about mid-way between the door opening and the body bolster. The rivet to fasten them to the side sill is about where the door stops are on the right side of the car.

A photo in the Ted Culotta Collection illustrates this.

B&O 267419 M26B Ted Culotta Collection interesting plate  door.JPG

I hope this helps.

Bob  Witt


B&O M-26B Cross Ties

Bill Welch
 

The B&O M-26B class like the WLE's X29 types shared the same rivet and side panel construction as the PRR's X29 types. The WLE (later NKP) cars however had their cross ties under the door posts instead of under the doors as with the X29. Is it known if the B&O's M26B class were like the WLE or did they also have their cross ties under the door like the Pennsy's X29.


Bill Welch


Kits are now for sale

Pierre Oliver
 

Hello gang;

See todays blog post;

http://elgincarshops.blogspot.com/2017/06/operators-are-standing-by.html

or visit the website directly

http://www.yarmouthmodelworks.com/index.php/ResinModelKits/Index

--
Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com


Re: Eggs served rubbery.

destorzek@...
 




---In STMFC@..., <jack.f.mullen@...> wrote :

Not quite. Eggs were dipped in an aqueous solution of sodium silicate which dried leaving a coating which acted to seal the naturally porous shells. Eggs thus treated kept much longer.

The treated eggs would be opened in the usual way: breaking the shells.

Jack Mullen
==================
And I would assume for boiled eggs, the boiling water just dissolved the sodium silicate, which still didn't penetrate the shell.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Eggs served rubbery.

Jack Mullen
 

Not quite. Eggs were dipped in an aqueous solution of sodium silicate which dried leaving a coating which acted to seal the naturally porous shells. Eggs thus treated kept much longer.

The treated eggs would be opened in the usual way: breaking the shells.

Jack Mullen


Eggs served rubbery.

richard glueck
 

I know eggs were at one time shipped encased in sodium silicate.  For those not familiar with it, sodium silicate is a liquid compound that gels when exposed to air.  What is produced is a clear gel/colloid, which has the texture of rubber.  I don't know how the eggs were released or if the sodium silicate was recovered for future use.


Dick
Winterport, Maine


Three operators needed for the June Alma branch op session

Jared Harper
 

It is that time again when I begin looking for three people to fill the engineer, conductor and brakeman operating crew positions to run trains 95/96 from Burlingame, KS,  to Alma, KS, and back in May 1943.  An op session begins with lunch before we head to the basement to run trains. All my Saturdays and Sundays are open in June except the 24th and 25th.  This will be the 22nd consecutive op session.  If you are interested let me know what dates for for you and we will see what can be worked out.  Positions are assigned on a first come first served basis.

Jared Harper
420 Woodward Way
Athens, GA 30606
706-543-8821


Moving again

Eric Hansmann
 

The wheels of change are turning again as we pack up the house for a move eastward. The Wheeling Freight Terminal will be moving, too, along with the locomotives and rolling stock. Check out the details in the latest DesignBuildOp blog post.

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/2017/06/01/moving-along/



Eric Hansmann
El Paso, TX

...soon to be from Tennessee!


Re: Green Frog Anomaly?

T.J. Stratton
 

George,


The Green Frog DVD "NYC Odyssey" was filmed on 16mm film by Emery Goulash beginning in 1952.  The portion of the DVD that you are referring to was filmed in early 1954.


TJ


TJ Stratton Maumee, OH. "Modeling the 1950's branch lines of the Michigan Central Railroad in southern Michigan" Mailto:michigancentralrr@...



From: STMFC@... on behalf of gsc3@... [STMFC]
Sent: Wednesday, May 31, 2017 5:31 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Green Frog Anomaly?
 
 

Was able to answer my own question.  Central of Georgia gons were painted black upto 1944.  But this photo suggest it's at least 6 to 10 following that.  So anew, anyone with a good guess as to when that was filmed in the Green Frog DVD?


Re: Green Frog Anomaly?

Todd Horton
 

The early C of G gons were painted black. The color change to FCR stated about 1948. I photographed a former C of G USRA clone in NS MofW service back in the 90's still in black paint. 
 
Todd Horton



From: "gsc3@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wednesday, May 31, 2017 5:27 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Green Frog Anomaly?

 
I was watching a Green Frog Preview of their New York Central Odyssey Vo.l and spotted either an anomaly or really soilid weathering on a Central of Georgia 40' 10 post gondola.  It occurs at the 3:39 mark.  A NYC switcher is pulling two gons.  The first is a clearly freight car red L&N 40' gon.  The typical L&N red is clear.  The second car is the Central of Georgia in what appears to be a badly faded black paint scheme.  I've seen several of these CG gons and all were freight car red in tone, none black.
Just curious if anyone else has seen that DVD or it's showing on youTube and has an explanation why the CG gon appears so black?  It's the comparison to the L&N gon next to it that suggest to me it can't all be color shift.  Anyone aware of CG painting their gons blacks and the time period?  Perhaps in the early 60's?  It has the same lettering as the Sunshine Central of Georiga kit.

Thanks,
George Courtney



Re: Green Frog Anomaly?

George Courtney
 

Was able to answer my own question.  Central of Georgia gons were painted black upto 1944.  But this photo suggest it's at least 6 to 10 following that.  So anew, anyone with a good guess as to when that was filmed in the Green Frog DVD?


Green Frog Anomaly?

George Courtney
 

I was watching a Green Frog Preview of their New York Central Odyssey Vo.l and spotted either an anomaly or really soilid weathering on a Central of Georgia 40' 10 post gondola.  It occurs at the 3:39 mark.  A NYC switcher is pulling two gons.  The first is a clearly freight car red L&N 40' gon.  The typical L&N red is clear.  The second car is the Central of Georgia in what appears to be a badly faded black paint scheme.  I've seen several of these CG gons and all were freight car red in tone, none black.

Just curious if anyone else has seen that DVD or it's showing on youTube and has an explanation why the CG gon appears so black?  It's the comparison to the L&N gon next to it that suggest to me it can't all be color shift.  Anyone aware of CG painting their gons blacks and the time period?  Perhaps in the early 60's?  It has the same lettering as the Sunshine Central of Georiga kit.


Thanks,

George Courtney


Re: Accurail Truss Rod Conversion [was] C&A 36 foot boxcar

Ray Breyer
 

>>A bigger problem is this will remove only about half the steel end sill, but this is all styrene, the sill can be cut off and a slice 
>>of an extra body can be spliced on. Evergreen HO scale scribed car siding could possibly also be used, as both are supposedly 
>>the same groove spacing; I've just never tried it. 


>>Dennis Storzek


I have Dennis; on a conversion into an MC auto box. I'll send you photos offlist in a minute.
Visually, the board spacing IS almost identical between your cars and .020" thick Evergreen car siding. Sadly, nobody makes Camel door hardware so I had to fudge a lot on my first test build. I need to railroad one of my 3D CAD buddies into printing up good door hardware sets....

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL



Accurail Truss Rod Conversion [was] C&A 36 foot boxcar

destorzek@...
 




---In STMFC@..., <rtbsvrr69@...> wrote :

If anyone's thinking about converting an Accurail shorty into a trussrodded car, keep in mind that it's a BIG boxcar for the pre-WWI period, and would have been a 40 ton, six rod car.

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL
===============

The Accurail car models a ca. 1912 steel underframe car with a 12'-7.5" height to the eaves. This can be reduced by slicing the steel side sill and bolster ends off the body, and sanding the floor narrower (before the crossbearers are installed) so it slips past the ledge in the body. With the bolsters flush with the bottom of the car siding, the eave height will be about 12'-1", or the bolsters can be allowed to protrude for a bit more height.

A bigger problem is this will remove only about half the steel end sill, but this is all styrene, the sill can be cut off and a slice of an extra body can be spliced on. Evergreen HO scale scribed car siding could possibly also be used, as both are supposedly the same groove spacing; I've just never tried it. 


Dennis Storzek


Re: C&A 36 foot boxcar

earlyrail
 

Or, we're talking about different cars from the SAME time period. I've got clear photos of nine C&A trussrodded boxcars. Only one car clearly has four rods, and that car was built in the 1870s.
C&A 4468, 4 trussrods, built ca.1875
C&A 7213, 6 trussrods, built ca.1889
C&A 7786, 6 trussrods, built 1899
C&A 13130, unknown, built 1897-1899 (and 1904, according to the ICC val report), LoC image
C&A 15281, unknown, built 1899. LoC image
C&A 27469, 6 trussrods, built 1906
C&A 36839, 6 trussrods, built 1906
C&A 36959, 6 trussrods, built 1906
C&A car at Monticello (supposedly 3516, which is probably wrong), 6 trussrods.

Earlier, shorter cars (35' and less) in the 20 and 30 ton capacity range usually had only four trussrods, while longer cars (45-foot furniture cars), and anything above 35 tons had six trussrods. So it's "likely" that the two cars mentioned in LoC image 4a20233 only have four since they're 30 ton cars. But even playing with various values of the 157 meg Tiff file can't say one way or another (and the 1910 C&A diagram book isn't any help either). Both four and six trussrods were "typical for the day", depending on how much weight the underframe was supposed to bear.

My knowledge is just from the LOC photo. Yes, these are 34' cars, not 36'. and are 60k capacity
15281 definitely has 4 truss rods as the 3 of the 4 ends can be seen on the car end.
13130 appears to have 4 truss rods, looking carefully at the photo you can see 3 rods, and the spacing seems to indicate only 4 of them.

Howard Garner


Re: C&A 36 foot boxcar

destorzek@...
 




---In STMFC@..., <rtbsvrr69@...>

Earlier, shorter cars (35' and less) in the 20 and 30 ton capacity range usually had only four trussrods, while longer cars (45-foot furniture cars), and anything above 35 tons had six trussrods. So it's "likely" that the two cars mentioned in LoC image 4a20233 only have four since they're 30 ton cars. But even playing with various values of the 157 meg Tiff file can't say one way or another (and the 1910 C&A diagram book isn't any help either). Both four and six trussrods were "typical for the day", depending on how much weight the underframe was supposed to bear.
======================

The LoC photo of C&A 15281 definitely shows only four truss rods. The thing about truss rods is they have to terminate somewhere, and anchoring to a casting attached to the side sill like a passenger car is extremely rare on freight cars. Plus, the truss rods passing through the end sills is what holds them on. Since we can see one end of C&A 15281 in the photo, the termination of three of the four rods clearly shows; two on the buffer block, and one on the near corner bracket, and I see no reason to suspect there isn't a similar one on the far corner. If the car would have had six truss rods, there would be another nut and forged washer midway between the corner and buffer block.

Dennis Storzek



HO Scale Freight Cars and Railway Prototype Cyclopedias For Sale

Matthew Dowd
 

All,


I have a short list of HO scale freight car (Brass, plastic and resin) Kits for sale along with 3 RP CYC volumes. Please email me OFF LIST for a copy using matt DOT dowd4 AT sbcglobal DOT NET. Thank you, and please ignore my earlier post about these items which was posted in error. 


-Matthew Dowd


Re: early covered hoppers

Andy Miller
 

I wonder if these Libby-Owens cars were how the category of freight car came to be classed “LO”.



Andy miller



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, May 30, 2017 11:12 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: early covered hoppers





Group,



Amazingly a picture of these cars in the later LOFX scheme has come to light in the reprints of the Rock Island Rocket magazines from the 1960s. This small photo was printed in the May-June 1963 issue. Using the photo of LOFX 301, a 1958 cuft ACF covered hopper, should allow creating decals to letter these cars in a more current paint scheme.



I'm not sure how many people are interested in this, but wanted to pass it along.



Link to photo:

https://goo.gl/photos/pYnnTb2qqA5DoxGy9



Eric Mumper



---In STMFC@..., <eric.mumper@...> wrote :

Group,



This is a new thread, but is part of the conversation on pre-WWII covered hoppers. One of the earliest of covered hoppers are the ones shown in the August of 1964 Model Railroader and offered by F&C as kit 6370. These were built in 1925 by the Bettendorf company for The National Plate Glass Company with reporting marks of NPGX. By the 1953 ORER these cars are now the property of Libbey-Owens-Ford glass company with reporting marks LOFX and appear to have car numbers 150-159, 170-173, and 201-210.



Does anybody happen to have a photo of these cars? MR only has a drawing and the heading "Covered hopper for silica sand". These may have been in captive service from the glass plant at Naplate, IL to Ottawa Silica Company for a distance of less than 5 miles. Not sure where MR got the info to do the drawing, but if I had to guess it would have been an add in a Car Builders Cyc. Sure would be great to actually have a picture of one of these. Thanks.



Eric Mumper

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