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Re: HO scale 3D printed D&RGW gondolas

Robert Heninger
 

I agree about the coarse details, but if I were modeling the D&RGW and needed dozens of them, I might think otherwise. The pictures of the finished model do look nice in the context of a finished scene.


One other thought I had was in regards to the long term dimensional stability of the model. I recall a discussion with Tom Madden at Cocoa Beach about this subject, and his opinion at the time was that 3D printing (rapid prototyping was the original term for the process, IIRC) was best used as a master to make a mold from which resin cars could be cast, as the 3D printed parts were prone to warping, etc. However, processes are continuously improved, especially in an emerging technology such as this one, so perhaps this is no longer a valid concern.


Tom, are you following this discussion and would you care to comment? I hope I haven't mischaracterized your comments. It's been a couple of years since we talked about this subject.


As far as the general applicability of GS gondolas to STMFC modelers, I've seen photos of IC gons in Washington state loaded with lumber, the Emil Strack photos on SmugMug show numerous instances of GS gons with lumber, and the GNRHS published a reference sheet years back pertaining to the GN's GS gondolas, and it made mention of a GN memo tracking the location of GN's GS fleet, which was scattered all over the country. The D&RGW gons often show up in pictures of GN trains in Washington, often with coal loads visible, so I can easily see how an empty gon could be confiscated and loaded with lumber on the GN for points all over the country.


Regards,

Bob Heninger

Minot, ND


Re: Ratios

Jim Betz
 

Armand,

First select the cars that will service your -on layout- industries.
Usually that will be about twice as many cars as you have car
spots (for empties in/loads out or vice versa).
Second select the cars that you will use as 'alternates' for those
selected in the first step (for variety over time).
Third select cars for run thru service (the cars in the second set
can be part of these).
NOW - apply your Ratios to adjust the overall layout fleet. If you
still have a lot of cars left over then they can be stored to be used
to swap (again to provide variety over time).

Don't forget to consider the "quality" of the cars you select.
Everybody oohs and aahs about layouts where "all of the cars
looked like museum quality/contest winners".

There are some errors in "car fleet decisions" that I notice the
most (as being "common" problems):

1) Too many home road cars. "I'm a Santa Fe modeler - so I'm
going to run almost all Santa Fe cars."

2) Cars/trains that 'always' go to the same industry/yard and
become 'recognizable' over time. (Also swap out the power
used for a particular train once in a while, same for cabeese.)

3) Too many cars that are "exceptions" - cars the owner fell in
love with and justified with the "it's my RR" rule (over used).

4) Too many cars that are exceptions simply due to the
stated era/date for the layout ... such as cars that would
have been seen in that era - but there are too many of them.
(For instance cars that are older. Same thing for cars that
would have been seen - but not in high numbers because
that particular car type/model was introduced only a few
years before the layout's date.)

5) Cars with paint/lettering schemes that don't fit the stated
era/theme. This is actually quite common - for foreign
road cars that the layout owner isn't up on the nuances
of those other roads. I'm a GN guy - I frequently see GN
cars on layouts that say "this is 1953" ... but there are
GN cars that are wearing paint/lettering schemes that
'weren't invented yet'.

Don't be too enslaved by the concept of ratios. Yes those
ratios existed and were real. But on any one day, on any one
railroad, on any one train ... you would rarely get those ratios
if you simply counted the cars and did the math.
In fact, as long as you don't fall into one of the traps above
(especially #1) and your cars are appropriate for era ... your
crews/visitors won't notice.
But they will notice if they keep delivering the same car
to the same industry every op session.

One last comment - I've operated on a lot of layouts that
were too crowded (had too many cars and trains and tried
to run too many trains in a session). I can't remember
ever saying to myself "this layout needs about 20% more"
(cars/trains) ... there's a lesson to be learned here. *G*
The same can be said of the number of operators - with
the exception that you do have times when "you hold an
Op session and nobody showed up". ;-)

Always go to actual photographs as your guide!
- Jim B.


Re: HO scale 3D printed D&RGW gondolas

Bill Welch
 

I remember seeing these cars in an article by Richard H. (I think) about GS gondolas and thinking they looking comparatively massive. especially the longer one. Is it reasonable to say these would have been rare east of the Mississippi River? Can someone offer more details about these cars and their use by the D&RGW?

It seems like it would be pretty easy to print this w/o so many of the details like grabs, sill steps, brake parts, door hardware, etc.

Bill Welch


Re: HO scale 3D printed D&RGW gondolas

 

For $65 they are awfully crude. That brake chain (?) looks like it’s a foot thick (yes, I’m exaggerating).





Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni



From: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com> on behalf of STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Reply-To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wednesday, June 14, 2017 at 12:50 AM
To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] HO scale 3D printed D&RGW gondolas





It is a nice looking car in the photos. I am tempted to buy one. Has anyone on this list tried these?



I wonder if this (3D printing) is the future of modeling, replacing resin casting. I've heard it said that it is hard to find people who can do good castings. Maybe we will end up replacing the hard-to-find resin casters with hard-to-find 3D designers.



Richard Townsend

Lincoln City, OR

-----Original Message-----
From: gn2059@gmail.com [STMFC] <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
To: STMFC <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Tue, Jun 13, 2017 9:09 pm
Subject: [STMFC] HO scale 3D printed D&RGW gondolas



Hello Group,



I happened across this seller on Ebay, offering HO scale 3D printed 42' and 46' Rio Grande GS gondolas. Here's a link:



http://www.ebay.com/sch/bonsallscalecarshops/m.html?item=232371077764&;rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2562



If the link doesn't work, the seller is Bonsall Scale Car Shops. I haven't purchased any of these kits, so I can't comment on the quality, but I know models of these prototypes have been long desired by many folks on this list, and I have not seen them discussed on this list.



They look nice in the pictures, and they are certainly more economical than the W&R model! I wonder if the seller is a member of this list?



Regards,

Bob Heninger

Minot, ND







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Help on tank colors - GATX 68508

Ted Culotta
 

I'm working on those decals... Sheesh, I just posed the initial query less than a week ago!


Re: HO scale 3D printed D&RGW gondolas

Ted Culotta
 

I like the detail, but hate the "printed on" grabs and brake gear. I emailed the seller to inquire about running them sans those details as the rest looks quite good.

Ted Culotta


Re: What Kind Of Car Is This?

John Moore
 

The flat car with the 3 wooden tubs is a Santa Fe water car.  Water cars of this type lasted into the 1930s and perhaps longer.  Water was hauled for company service - extra gangs - etc.  Metal tank cars eventually replaced the wood tub cars.

John B. Moore, Jr.
Albuquerque


Re: What Kind Of Car Is This?

al_brown03
 

Florida East Coast shipped fresh water into the Keys, ca 1912, in cars that looked very much like this. See Bramson, "Speedway to Sunshine", p 90. (Later on, conventional tank cars were used: same page.)

The pickle cars I'm familiar with had frameworks around the pickle tubs. See Leider, "Pickle and Vinegar Makers of the Midwest", pp 51-73. In principle a stout enough tub mightn't need a frame, but I haven't seen one that way.

So, I'd guess this is a water car.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


Re: What Kind Of Car Is This?

Tony Thompson
 

EARLY WINE CARS MAYBE


   Wine was extensively shipped in conventional tank cars as early as 1910. These wooden tubs seem to me most unlikely to be in use for that purpose.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: What Kind Of Car Is This?

Robert Kessler
 

I have seen wine tanks that look like that.  Perhaps its a shipment of them.

Bob Kessler


Re: What Kind Of Car Is This?

Robert Kessler
 

I have seen wine tanks that look like that.  Perhaps its a shipment of them.

Bob Kessler


Re: HO scale 3D printed D&RGW gondolas

Dave Nelson
 

Hey, those look pretty good.



I have the DRGW’s own blueprints for the 1922 car and having done most of the work to put it into a 3d mesh considered the notion of 3d printing it. It’s kinda nice to see someone beat me to it… one less thing on my to-do list.



Dave Nelson



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Tuesday, June 13, 2017 9:10 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] HO scale 3D printed D&RGW gondolas








Hello Group,



I happened across this seller on Ebay, offering HO scale 3D printed 42' and 46' Rio Grande GS gondolas. Here's a link:



http://www.ebay.com/sch/bonsallscalecarshops/m.html?item=232371077764 <http://www.ebay.com/sch/bonsallscalecarshops/m.html?item=232371077764&;rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2562> &rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2562



If the link doesn't work, the seller is Bonsall Scale Car Shops. I haven't purchased any of these kits, so I can't comment on the quality, but I know models of these prototypes have been long desired by many folks on this list, and I have not seen them discussed on this list.



They look nice in the pictures, and they are certainly more economical than the W&R model! I wonder if the seller is a member of this list?



Regards,

Bob Heninger

Minot, ND












[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Ratios

Dave Nelson
 

If Tim Gilbert were still with us he’d whip out his set of ICC Blue Books and write 14 pages in one paragraph telling us about steel vs. wood, etc. etc. etc., no doubt managing to toss in ton miles as a necessary unit of measure for something. :-)

 

I could go unearth old ICC documents I have that have pretty much the same thing and if you wanted very specific numbers I could write a bunch of sql queries and get the answers from my ORER database (April 1950)*, but to be frank, I’ve got other things to do than walk over such old ground.

 

Search the archives, my posts or his.

 

 

I opened up this database a couple of weeks ago WRT southeastern hoppers in the SOU Wheel reports… probably the first time in 10 years I’ve looked at it.  It still works.  I had always hoped to put it online, part of the forum I host but w/o a tech admin to help upgrade the board software (a prerequisite)  so no, it hasn’t happened.

 

Dave Nelson


Re: HO scale 3D printed D&RGW gondolas

Richard Townsend
 

It is a nice looking car in the photos. I am tempted to buy one. Has anyone on this list tried these?
 
I wonder if this (3D printing) is the future of modeling, replacing resin casting. I've heard it said that it is hard to find people who can do good castings. Maybe we will end up replacing the hard-to-find resin casters with hard-to-find 3D designers.
 
Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR
 
 

-----Original Message-----
From: gn2059@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Tue, Jun 13, 2017 9:09 pm
Subject: [STMFC] HO scale 3D printed D&RGW gondolas

 
Hello Group,

I happened across this seller on Ebay, offering HO scale 3D printed 42' and 46' Rio Grande GS gondolas. Here's a link:


If the link doesn't work, the seller is Bonsall Scale Car Shops. I haven't purchased any of these kits, so I can't comment on the quality, but I know models of these prototypes have been long desired by many folks on this list, and I have not seen them discussed on this list.

They look nice in the pictures, and they are certainly more economical than the W&R model! I wonder if the seller is a member of this list? 

Regards,
Bob Heninger
Minot, ND


Re: What Kind Of Car Is This?

tjcataldo
 

EARLY WINE CARS MAYBE

TOM CATALDO

On Tuesday, June 13, 2017, thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

This photo is from the Barringer Library, probably pre-1940:

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/12293135473/in/dateposted/

 

Notice the freight car to the left. It appears to be a flat car with three vertical wooden tanks on it. But maybe it's something else?

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA



--
Thomas  j Cataldo


Re: What Kind Of Car Is This?

Douglas Harding
 

The photo was taken in Fort Madison IA, between 1936-38 according to the captions under the photo. It looks an early oil tank car, but oil shipments had shifted to horizontal tanks long before the time of this photo. It could be a pickle or vinegar car, or as suggested a water car for work crews. Note it is coupled to an early tank car.

Doug Harding


What Kind Of Car Is This?

Andy Carlson
 

Just a WAG...........but the Arrowhead Water Company had quite a fleet of water cars for hauling "Mountain Spring" Arrowhead water from up the mountains above San Bernardino to their bottling plant on Washington Ave in downtown L.A. The trip was usually 100% on P.E. RoW. Arguing against this guess would be the apparent lack of trolley overhead wires.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA



From: "thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tuesday, June 13, 2017 9:05 PM
Subject: [STMFC] What Kind Of Car Is This?

 
This photo is from the Barringer Library, probably pre-1940:
 
 
Notice the freight car to the left. It appears to be a flat car with three vertical wooden tanks on it. But maybe it's something else?
 
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA



Re: What Kind Of Car Is This?

John C. La Rue, Jr. <MOFWCABOOSE@...>
 

Lettering is not clear, but it could be a car with tubs to carry potable water for use in an extra gang outfit of camp cars. This type of water car used to be fairly common. Cars could have one, two, or three tubs. If only one or two, they were usually at the ends, where their weight when loaded was supported by the bolster and the truck under them.
 
John C. La Rue, Jr.
Bonita Springs, FL
 
 

-----Original Message-----
From: thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Wed, Jun 14, 2017 12:05 am
Subject: [STMFC] What Kind Of Car Is This?

 
This photo is from the Barringer Library, probably pre-1940:
 
 
Notice the freight car to the left. It appears to be a flat car with three vertical wooden tanks on it. But maybe it's something else?
 
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: What Kind Of Car Is This?

Jeff Shultz <jeff@...>
 

Pickle car? Looks rather like the old Tyco car. 

On Jun 13, 2017 21:05, "thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

This photo is from the Barringer Library, probably pre-1940:

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/12293135473/in/dateposted/

 

Notice the freight car to the left. It appears to be a flat car with three vertical wooden tanks on it. But maybe it's something else?

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


HO scale 3D printed D&RGW gondolas

Robert Heninger
 

Hello Group,


I happened across this seller on Ebay, offering HO scale 3D printed 42' and 46' Rio Grande GS gondolas. Here's a link:


http://www.ebay.com/sch/bonsallscalecarshops/m.html?item=232371077764&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2562


If the link doesn't work, the seller is Bonsall Scale Car Shops. I haven't purchased any of these kits, so I can't comment on the quality, but I know models of these prototypes have been long desired by many folks on this list, and I have not seen them discussed on this list.


They look nice in the pictures, and they are certainly more economical than the W&R model! I wonder if the seller is a member of this list? 


Regards,

Bob Heninger

Minot, ND


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