Date   

Re: A great Shorpey's photo

rwitt_2000
 

My list is below.


Scranton Silk Mill box car and reefer

Delaware Lackawanna & Western 10486
Delaware Lackawanna & Western
Delaware Lackawanna & Western 2468
Central Railroad of New Jersey
gap
LS&MS
CRR of NJ
CRR of NJ reefer
cannot resolve
Gon
Gon
Track through loading/unloading shed
cannot resolve
D&H Co
Left hand door LV flag emblem
PRR XL sealed door
Mostly locked by trees


Bob Witt


Re: YVRR layout video on YouTube...

Jon Miller <atsfus@...>
 

On 7/22/2017 11:07 AM, 'Jack Burgess' jack@... [STMFC] wrote:

Back on 6/12/2017, Jon Miller asked if the YouTube video of my Yosemite Valley Railroad layout was available in Blu-Ray.

Ordered mine!

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: GATX 74355 & 7280

hubert mask
 

I like that one lots of data. 

Hubert Mask 
Mask Island Decals Inc 


On Jul 22, 2017, at 12:22 PM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 


Desperately need decals for these!

I'm pretty sure the tank color is GREEN, by the way. A-B also had aluminum color tank cars
in the 1950's, but later photos are all darker - so far. A-B had at least 3 different design GATC
tank cars in this service.

A GATC 8k tank car, eminently kitbashable in HO scale, at least. :-)

Tim O'


Anheuser Busch Tank Car:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/10795624@N07/13825594013/in/dateposted/
Bob Chaparro


Re: A great Shorpey's photo

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Almost, Tim.



Thanks for the link to the 160MB file from the Library of Congress . . .



Three cars, DL&W

One CRRof NJ

One Lake Shore & Michigan Southern

Two CRRofNJ

One light colored mystery

Two low sided gons, which MIGHT be DL&W?



Then, coming out the other side of the shed

I'm guessing Lehigh Valley . . .

D&H 18264 (not quite sure of number)

If I am right about the LV car, this is another one

Another hard to read, MAYBE L&N, but that seems odd in this group.



Schuyler





From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Saturday, July 22, 2017 12:43 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] A great Shorpey's photo






First three box cars say Delaware Lackawanna & Western, and the next two
are Central Railroad of New Jersey.







Here's the Library of Congress image link where you can download a HUGE TIF
image file that makes it easier to zoom in for a ook around.
https://www.loc.gov/resource/det.4a07803/


Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN





On July 22, 2017 at 8:06 AM "richard_glueck@yahoo.com [STMFC]"
<STMFC@yahoogroups.com> wrote:



Sauquoit Silk Mill in Scranton, Pa., away back. I bring it up her because
of the string of freight cars. You can enlarge the phot and look at them in
pretty good size, but poor detail. I think I see one identifiable as a PRR
"Red Ball Service" boxcar, but the variations are beautiful in today's eyes.

http://www.shorpy.com/node/22311?size=_original#caption



Dick


YVRR layout video on YouTube...

Jack Burgess
 

Back on 6/12/2017, Jon Miller asked if the YouTube video of my Yosemite Valley Railroad layout was available in Blu-Ray. Yes, it is now available from TSG Multimedia in both DVD and Blu-Ray formats:

 

DVD:

https://tsgmultimedia.com/product/ho-yosemite-valley-layout-tour-dvd/

 

Blu Ray:

https://tsgmultimedia.com/product/ho-yosemite-valley-layout-tour-blu-ray/

 

Jack Burgess

 


Re: A great Shorpey's photo

Tim O'Connor
 


First three box cars say Delaware Lackawanna & Western, and the next two
are Central Railroad of New Jersey.






Here's the Library of Congress image link where you can download a HUGE TIF image file that makes it easier to zoom in for a ook around.
https://www.loc.gov/resource/det.4a07803/


Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN


On July 22, 2017 at 8:06 AM "richard_glueck@... [STMFC]" wrote:



Sauquoit Silk Mill in Scranton, Pa., away back.  I bring it up her because of the string of freight cars.  You can enlarge the phot and look at them in pretty good size, but poor detail.  I think I see one identifiable as a PRR "Red Ball Service" boxcar, but the variations are beautiful in today's eyes.

http://www.shorpy.com/node/22311?size=_original#caption



Dick


Re: GATX 74355 & 7280

Tim O'Connor
 


Desperately need decals for these!

I'm pretty sure the tank color is GREEN, by the way. A-B also had aluminum color tank cars
in the 1950's, but later photos are all darker - so far. A-B had at least 3 different design GATC
tank cars in this service.

A GATC 8k tank car, eminently kitbashable in HO scale, at least. :-)

Tim O'



DL & W boxcar lettering

John Riddell
 

In the 1950's the DL&W applied lettering to boxcars with tall block lettering LACKAWANNA left of the door

The height of the tall lettering seemed to be both 30" and 22".


Is there any photo evidence that the DL&W applied this lettering to any of their 40-6 wood-sided double-sheathed boxcars of series 45000-46999 ? 


John Riddell


ATSF Lettering Air Dump Cars (Magor)

rwitt_2000
 

Currently on eBay

The sellers description:

This is an original 1955 Blueprint Plan for the AT&SF Lettering of  Air Dump Cars. By the Engineer Car Construction, Topeka, Kansas October 14, 1955. Measuring 57" side to side, it has a height of 14 3/4".

http://www.ebay.com/itm/112489358156?ul_noapp=true


The blueprint references classes:


GA-98  186050-186099

GA-106 186100-186124

GA-112 186125-186149



Bob Witt


Re: A great Shorpey's photo

Eric Hansmann
 

Here's the Library of Congress image link where you can download a HUGE TIF image file that makes it easier to zoom in for a ook around.
https://www.loc.gov/resource/det.4a07803/


Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN


On July 22, 2017 at 8:06 AM "richard_glueck@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:



Sauquoit Silk Mill in Scranton, Pa., away back.  I bring it up her because of the string of freight cars.  You can enlarge the phot and look at them in pretty good size, but poor detail.  I think I see one identifiable as a PRR "Red Ball Service" boxcar, but the variations are beautiful in today's eyes.

http://www.shorpy.com/node/22311?size=_original#caption



Dick


A great Shorpey's photo

richard glueck
 

Sauquoit Silk Mill in Scranton, Pa., away back.  I bring it up her because of the string of freight cars.  You can enlarge the phot and look at them in pretty good size, but poor detail.  I think I see one identifiable as a PRR "Red Ball Service" boxcar, but the variations are beautiful in today's eyes.

http://www.shorpy.com/node/22311?size=_original#caption



Dick


GATX 74355 & 7280

thecitrusbelt@...
 


Re: Grain Elevators in the 20s and 30s?

al_brown03
 

I've been thinking the grain-elevator thread would be appropriate for the Proto-Layouts group, in fact I thought it was *on* that Group, until I saw the Sheriff's post terminating it.

Required content: Lots and lots of grain was shipped in STMFCs.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


Re: Grain Elevators in the 20s and 30s?

Mikebrock
 

Bob Chaparro writes:

“The good news is that there is a Yahoo Grain Elevator Special Interest Group”

Good because grain elevators, not being frt cars, are not an accepted subject on the STMFC and, therefor, the thread about grain elevators is terminated.

Mike Brock

STMFC Boss





Bob Chaparro



The good news is that there is a Yahoo Grain Elevator Special Interest Group:



<https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/grainelevatorsig/info> https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/grainelevatorsig/info



The bad new is that they haven't had a message post since December 2015.



Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Grain Elevators in the 20s and 30s?

Douglas Harding
 

Jim, let me see if I can answer a few of your questions. I live in Iowa and am familiar with grain elevators. In the 20s & 30s Iowa and southern Minnesota was raising corn and oats, with some wheat, but most went into feed for livestock. Most grain raised in Wisconsin also went into livestock feed. Northern Minnesota, the Dakotas and Montana was wheat country. Also other small grains like flax, rye, hops, etc. Corn yields were about 20 to 30 bushels per acre. Compare to today whene typically corn yield is 150-170 bushels, with many farms seeing close to 200 bushels.

 

1)      Grain elevators date back to the 1840s, when Buffalo NY became the place connecting the great lakes with New York City via the Erie Canal and the home of the first grain elevator. The wood cribbed elevator you see in your photos was quite common by 1900. Common construction was a square or rectangle shape, anywhere from 16’ to 36’ along one side. Height ranged from 40’ to upwards of 80’ for wood elevator. Concrete elevators reached heights of 110’ and higher. The walls were built with 2xmaterial laid flat and nailed together. The bottom was laid with 2x12s or 2x10s, then as the height grew the wall was reduced to 2x8s then 2x6s. The corners were interlaced in a finger joint. Then covered with siding. There were no corner trim boards because the weight of the grain would compress the walls in the first couple of years. This compression would cause any trim boards to pop loose.

2)      Competition: the situation you describe sounds like western wheat lands. At least one elevator would be owned by a local farmer coop association of some sort, larger areas might have two. One would be a local owned private concern. And at least one would be owned by a large flour mill operation, ie Pillsbury, General Mills, Cargill, etc. Coops existed to give members an advantage for purchasing as well as selling. Also the coop would extend a line of credit to members. The private elevator was a cash operation, who would buy the farmers grain and hope to sell it in a larger market while making a profit. The flour mills were buying direct from the farmers, they might pay a little more, but they might not.

3)      The great western prairie wheat lands were sparsely populated. And there may have only been two passenger trains a day, so people would only be present when a train was expected. In the era you describe folks only came to town once a week to do their trading, if that often. As the town was small the population was minimal.

4)      Short Answer: Yes. But unlike today the harvest was moved to processing centers, ie flour mills.

5)      Much of the land west of the Mississippi was developed as the railroads move west. In fact many towns were established by the railroads as a water stop. Soon a depot and stock pen was added, then a grain elevator, a store, etc. The town I live in was not incorporated until 10 years after the railroad came through. The first form of government did not form until 2 years after the railroad. The land grant railroads marketed and sold their land to prospective farmers, even running immigrant trains bringing new settlers to the wide open prairies. In many areas the railroad came first, the towns and people followed.

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Friday, July 21, 2017 6:09 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Grain Elevators in the 20s and 30s?

 

 

Hi,

I don't know where else would be a better place to post this question ...

I just this week received some new Photo CDs and one of them is of GN
- Depots.
There are a -lot- (not just a few) images that were taken in the early
part of the
century (probably 1920, perhaps teens, unlikely to be later than 1935)
and they
are of "lonely places out on the prairies" where there are grain elevators.
That's no surprise. What is a surprise to me is to find so many images
where there wasn't just one or two elevators but rather 4, 5, 6 and even
more. And where there was little else anywhere near - a small station but
no "town". And they are BIG structures, always of wood, and with more
than one company in evidence where ever I could read more than one
label.

I'm hoping to get "edumacated" by someone with more experience in
Minnesota, North and South Dakota, Iowa, and Eastern Montana ... and
a little bit of Wisconsin and Manitoba.

My questions/wonderings are:

1) I've never understood that the grain elevators were that early.
These are definitely in the horse and wagon era.

2) Due to the size - and number - of the elevators at these locations
they had to be storing a LOT of grain. I'm surprised that there
was so much grain to store (see above comments about what
states we are talking about. But, in support of the need is the
fact that the land around them is "dead flat" and with no patches
of hills/forests in evidence.

3) The stations almost appear to be more of "some place for the
local freight agent to work" ... than for passengers. They do
have a platform and a train order board but there aren't people
around them waiting for a train. Nor are their vehicles/wagons/
buggies. But they are -clearly- not abandoned and the elevators
are clearly in use.

4) So were they already doing the "store the harvest in the elevator
and then sell and ship it thru the rest of the year" thing that
early? Sure looks like the probable explanation.

5) I've seen lots of pictures of prairie towns with an elevator before.
What I found curious/interesting about these pictures is that it
almost seems like the elevators (and stations) were built first
and the towns "grew up around them" later.

****

If you haven't seen any of them - I am very happy with my
purchases of Photo CDs from PrairieWorks. I got them on eBay.
You pretty much have to be a fan of the Northern tier of states
from Minnesota to Washington to "need" them.
- Jim B.


Re: Grain Elevators in the 20s and 30s?

thecitrusbelt@...
 

The good news is that there is a Yahoo Grain Elevator Special Interest Group:


https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/grainelevatorsig/info


The bad new is that they haven't had a message post since December 2015.


Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Grain Elevators in the 20s and 30s?

Jim Betz
 

Hi,

I don't know where else would be a better place to post this question ...

I just this week received some new Photo CDs and one of them is of GN - Depots.
There are a -lot- (not just a few) images that were taken in the early part of the
century (probably 1920, perhaps teens, unlikely to be later than 1935) and they
are of "lonely places out on the prairies" where there are grain elevators.
That's no surprise. What is a surprise to me is to find so many images
where there wasn't just one or two elevators but rather 4, 5, 6 and even
more. And where there was little else anywhere near - a small station but
no "town". And they are BIG structures, always of wood, and with more
than one company in evidence where ever I could read more than one
label.

I'm hoping to get "edumacated" by someone with more experience in
Minnesota, North and South Dakota, Iowa, and Eastern Montana ... and
a little bit of Wisconsin and Manitoba.

My questions/wonderings are:

1) I've never understood that the grain elevators were that early.
These are definitely in the horse and wagon era.

2) Due to the size - and number - of the elevators at these locations
they had to be storing a LOT of grain. I'm surprised that there
was so much grain to store (see above comments about what
states we are talking about. But, in support of the need is the
fact that the land around them is "dead flat" and with no patches
of hills/forests in evidence.

3) The stations almost appear to be more of "some place for the
local freight agent to work" ... than for passengers. They do
have a platform and a train order board but there aren't people
around them waiting for a train. Nor are their vehicles/wagons/
buggies. But they are -clearly- not abandoned and the elevators
are clearly in use.

4) So were they already doing the "store the harvest in the elevator
and then sell and ship it thru the rest of the year" thing that
early? Sure looks like the probable explanation.

5) I've seen lots of pictures of prairie towns with an elevator before.
What I found curious/interesting about these pictures is that it
almost seems like the elevators (and stations) were built first
and the towns "grew up around them" later.

****

If you haven't seen any of them - I am very happy with my
purchases of Photo CDs from PrairieWorks. I got them on eBay.
You pretty much have to be a fan of the Northern tier of states
from Minnesota to Washington to "need" them.
- Jim B.


Re: Question for DL&W Mavens

ed_mines
 

Both societies publish magazines but I can't tell you if the information you seek was in either one (the E-L society shows the contents of their back issue magazines on their web site).


There may have been/is a Lackawanna RR web site.


Ed Mines



Whats in a color?

Andy Carlson
 

Years ago, I mentioned to a friend who was a strong advocate for accurate colors, mostly for passenger trains, though lots of freight cars, too, about how an Accupaint lacquer mix color looked so pleasing to me but only under certain kind of light. Outdoors and my models seemed to turn iridescent.

My friend gave me a lecture I have not forgotten; be careful in mixing colors so that the end product doesn't end up with lots of differing pigments. He stated that most commercial paints used by the railroads were rarely wild custom blends, most were catalog industrial fleet colors with few and simple common pigments. By mixing many varied colors to get a certain match, I was ending up with a pigment stew.

Great Northern RR used their Empire Builder green and orange colors for some damage-free loader equipped box cars. At my friend's suggestion, I tried a mix of 2 paints, both which were mono-pigmented, Black automotive lacquer and Chromium Yellow. This is pretty much the recipe used for years for Pullman Green and various similar greens for RR use.

The resulting E.B. Green looks fantastic, and views well under various differing light sources, a real plus! Buoyed by this success, I acquired a good sampling of various lacquer colors, good to have done so before the availability of automotive lacquers became difficult in California.

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA



Tru-Color Paint (TCP) application notes

Denny Anspach <danspachmd@...>
 

Friends, Martin Cohen from Tru-Color paints (Phoenix, AZ)  replied to some application inquiries of mine, and I thought that i would share this annotated useful information with you. 

1)  Air pressure should be 28-35 PSI, no matter how much it is thinned. This will give a nice glossy to semi-gloss finish and the paint will not dry too quickly which will cause blushing or rough appearance. 

2) If the paint bottle purchased is full (some evaporation may take place on the shelf), then thinning is NOT required and you can spray from the bottle. If thinning is desired we recommend no more than 25% thinner. 

3) Retarder should be used when the temp. reaches above 85 degrees - it will slow done the evaporation of the solvents. No more than 15% should be used - a few drops of this goes along way.

4) 800 series flat finishes: As for the flat black, it is only intended for paint brush. All of the 800 series are intended for paint brush application - they are too thick to spray. However, they can be thinned with our thinner; recommend 50/50 to start with and see how it will spray with an air brush.

I have since sprayed some of the thinned Flat Black and the result seems to be an attractive egg shell finish.  I will be attempting a more comprehensive test later.





Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento, CA 95864

38621 - 38640 of 189853