Date   

Re: Square Wire for Vertical Brake Staffs

Bill Welch
 

Bill and others, I am looking at this product: https://www.kidneypuncher.com/n80-square-wire-100ft-spool/

Only $8.50

The question I have is can the Sandvik Nichrome 80 !! material be straightened?

Bill Welch
 


Re: Increase to 30 Cars. --WAS Re: Re: HO 20 car freight car train

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Rich, Todd and Friends,

What railroad? Which branch/section, or between which cities? What season?
What overhead traffic moved on this track? Any branches or captive shortlines? What industries were served by this line? Which industries are you modeling? These are the sort of factors that will determine your consist, not what is a typical train for a broad three-state region. Sorry to burst your bubble, but I think this is a more profitable and interesting exercise.

With courtesy,


Garth Groff


On 8/1/17 5:19 PM, Richard Ramik richramik@... [STMFC] wrote:
 

I have found this thread very informative and helpful from a modeling perspective.  I have deficiencies that I obviously need to address.

To your point, the plan (mine) is to run 30 car trains in the Fall of 1955.  This would be in NJ, PA, NY.  What would or could a train look like????



Rich Ramik
richramik@...


-----Original Message-----
From: sullivant41@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Thu, Jul 27, 2017 7:23 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: HO 20 car freight car train

 
I really like the suggestions for substitutions made so far.  The list was limited to 20 cars, and I did consider some of the suggested cars, but had to make the cut somewhere.  Now, if we increased it to 25 or 30 ... lots more could be added!   ;-)

Todd Sullivan


Re: Square Wire for Vertical Brake Staffs

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

I did not see any pricing as well  I can' see them shipping one 12" piece which is what most of us want.  Maby we shoud form a "hui" (group).  Anyone want to take this on?

Bill Pardie



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: "Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...>
Date: 8/1/17 2:09 AM (GMT-10:00)
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Square Wire for Vertical Brake Staffs

 


  I did a quick Google search and found this web site with 0.015" square wire:
  https://www.gibbswire.com/square-wire/
  I didn't look into pricing.
  Spen Kellogg


Wow, and it comes in phosphor-bronze too!

I am reminded of a very successful New England tech company called CABLETRON
(eventually absorbed by another tech giant). Their first "product" was simple
short lengths of telephone cable! They would buy giant spools, and sell shorter
lengths. Turns out no one had ever thought of this before, and they made a
small fortune. Then they started making gadgets...

Maybe some entrepeneur here can buy a 1000 ft spool of square wire... :-)

Tim O'Connor


Increase to 30 Cars. --WAS Re: Re: HO 20 car freight car train

Richard Ramik <richramik@...>
 

I have found this thread very informative and helpful from a modeling perspective.  I have deficiencies that I obviously need to address.

To your point, the plan (mine) is to run 30 car trains in the Fall of 1955.  This would be in NJ, PA, NY.  What would or could a train look like????


Rich Ramik
richramik@...


-----Original Message-----
From: sullivant41@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Thu, Jul 27, 2017 7:23 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: HO 20 car freight car train

 
I really like the suggestions for substitutions made so far.  The list was limited to 20 cars, and I did consider some of the suggested cars, but had to make the cut somewhere.  Now, if we increased it to 25 or 30 ... lots more could be added!   ;-)

Todd Sullivan


Re: What type of industry is this, at the inclined ramp

Schleigh Mike
 

Hello Group!

Some of these coaling stations did not have even platforms.  A coal-carrying-gondola was spotted and blocked on the top of a raised track.  Manual labor moved the coal from the car directly to the tender of the locomotive strategically spotted on an adjacent track.  No cover, no lighting, no platform, no chutes, no machinery, and no extra help for the one worker who did this between the switching shifts of those terminals.  He was likely also the keeper of the locomotive's fire and the night watchman.  Times have changed.

From Grove City, Penna.----Mike Schleigh 


From: "'Doug Harding' doug.harding@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tuesday, August 1, 2017 4:06 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: What type of industry is this, at the inclined ramp

 
Remember many of the trestle style coaling stations were built in the early days of railroading. Engines were small, labor was cheap. The first were indeed simple raised platforms on which coal was shoveled from a gon, then when an engine needed coaling the crew shoveled coal form the platform to the tender. As engines got larger the trestles got taller, and bins replaced the platforms. Many were covered. One or more gons or hoppers were shoved up the trestle and coal was shoveled or dumped into the bins. The bins had chutes on the side so an engine could be coaled by spotting the tender under the chute. The coaling station with a trestle was used by many railroads up into the 20s. But I believe they are all gone, replaced with coaling towers. As engine size increased, the appetite for coal grew, but also the distance an engine could go on one load of coal. Railroads began replacing their trestle coaling stations with coaling towers for faster more efficient coaling of locomotives. The first were built out of wood, but then concrete and steel. Some of these concrete behemoths still stand, no longer used and stripped of their metal parts.
 
Doug  Harding
www.iowacentralrr.org
 
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, August 1, 2017 2:32 PM
To: 'Charles Morrill' badlands@... [STMFC]
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: What type of industry is this, at the inclined ramp
 
 
The LV had a coal transfer facility in Rochester NY  that was about twice as high. It could store and dump into hopper‎s on the sides. 
 
This CNW facility is a little strange in that there is not enough elevational change ‎to make the coal flow. The ramp is also very clean, unlike the LV ramp that was heavily covered in coal. Maybe the CNW facility wasn't for coal. 
 
Mark Landgraf
Albany NY
 
From: 'Charles Morrill' badlands@... [STMFC]
Sent: Tuesday, August 1, 2017 1:49 PM
Reply To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: What type of industry is this, at the inclined ramp
 
 
A ramp set up like this was used to transfer bulk commodities from narrow gauge cars to standard gauge cars.  The SP had a similar facility at its narrow gauge/standard gauge interchange.
 
Charlie
 
From: Jerry Breon jbreon@... [STMFC]
Sent: Tuesday, August 01, 2017 12:15 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: What type of industry is this, at the inclined ramp
 



While I agree with the majority of group members that the incline ramp in the photo below is leading to a small, steam locomotive coaling facility, I'm wondering if there were ever any similar facilities of this era that existed for the purpose of transferring bulk commodities (coal, sand, gravel, etc.) from one freight car to another or if the need to do so even existed?
Thanks,
Jerry Breon
Mooresville, NC
 
Sat Jul 29, 2017 10:27 am (PDT) . Posted by:

"Claus Schlund" clausschlund

Hi List Members,

What type of industry is this, at the inclined ramp, being served by steam era freight cars on the C&NW?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/12294845895/sizes/o/

Claus Schlund
 





Re: What type of industry is this, at the inclined ramp

Dennis Storzek
 

---In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, <mark_landgraf@...> wrote :





This CNW facility is a little strange in that there is not enough elevational change ‎to make the coal flow. The ramp is also very clean, unlike the LV ramp that was heavily covered in coal. Maybe the CNW facility wasn't for coal.


Mark Landgraf
Albany NY

===================


And what would it be for? It's not a transfer facility, as the only track it serves is the main line.

It may just be out of service. These empty the gon with a shovel, then shovel into the tender facilities were painfully labor intensive, and were eventually superseded by either coaling towers, or mechanized plants. As the railroads adopted larger capacity tenders, a lot of these intermediate coaling facilities were no longer needed, but possibly left in place against future need, until the decision was made to tear them down. The Soo Line had several of these through central Wisconsin; as far as I know, none lasted beyond WWII.

Dennis Storzek


Re: What type of industry is this, at the inclined ramp

Douglas Harding
 

Remember many of the trestle style coaling stations were built in the early days of railroading. Engines were small, labor was cheap. The first were indeed simple raised platforms on which coal was shoveled from a gon, then when an engine needed coaling the crew shoveled coal form the platform to the tender. As engines got larger the trestles got taller, and bins replaced the platforms. Many were covered. One or more gons or hoppers were shoved up the trestle and coal was shoveled or dumped into the bins. The bins had chutes on the side so an engine could be coaled by spotting the tender under the chute. The coaling station with a trestle was used by many railroads up into the 20s. But I believe they are all gone, replaced with coaling towers. As engine size increased, the appetite for coal grew, but also the distance an engine could go on one load of coal. Railroads began replacing their trestle coaling stations with coaling towers for faster more efficient coaling of locomotives. The first were built out of wood, but then concrete and steel. Some of these concrete behemoths still stand, no longer used and stripped of their metal parts.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, August 1, 2017 2:32 PM
To: 'Charles Morrill' badlands@... [STMFC]
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: What type of industry is this, at the inclined ramp

 

 

The LV had a coal transfer facility in Rochester NY  that was about twice as high. It could store and dump into hopper‎s on the sides. 

 

This CNW facility is a little strange in that there is not enough elevational change ‎to make the coal flow. The ramp is also very clean, unlike the LV ramp that was heavily covered in coal. Maybe the CNW facility wasn't for coal. 

 

Mark Landgraf

Albany NY

 

From: 'Charles Morrill' badlands@... [STMFC]

Sent: Tuesday, August 1, 2017 1:49 PM

Reply To: STMFC@...

Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: What type of industry is this, at the inclined ramp

 

 

A ramp set up like this was used to transfer bulk commodities from narrow gauge cars to standard gauge cars.  The SP had a similar facility at its narrow gauge/standard gauge interchange.

 

Charlie

 

From: Jerry Breon jbreon@... [STMFC]

Sent: Tuesday, August 01, 2017 12:15 PM

Subject: [STMFC] Re: What type of industry is this, at the inclined ramp

 




While I agree with the majority of group members that the incline ramp in the photo below is leading to a small, steam locomotive coaling facility, I'm wondering if there were ever any similar facilities of this era that existed for the purpose of transferring bulk commodities (coal, sand, gravel, etc.) from one freight car to another or if the need to do so even existed?

Thanks,

Jerry Breon

Mooresville, NC

 

Sat Jul 29, 2017 10:27 am (PDT) . Posted by:

"Claus Schlund" clausschlund

Hi List Members,

What type of industry is this, at the inclined ramp, being served by steam era freight cars on the C&NW?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/12294845895/sizes/o/

Claus Schlund

 




Re: Early Bulkhead Kit for SP Flat Car

vapeurchapelon
 

Are these kits the same as were on the class F-70-6 cars sold exclusively through the SPH&TS some years ago?
 
Johannes
 
Gesendet: Dienstag, 01. August 2017 um 20:14 Uhr
Von: "Tony Thompson tony@... [STMFC]"
An: STMFC@...
Betreff: [STMFC] Re: Early Bulkhead Kit for SP Flat Car
 

 

Bill Welch wrote:
 
 

I would like to purchase an EARLY Bulkhead kit for the Southern Pacific flat cars as offered by the SP Historical Society. They are sold out of this version.

 
      If anyone else is looking for one or more of these, I know of a source. Please contact me OFF-LIST if interested.
 
Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history
 

 
 

 


Re: What type of industry is this, at the inclined ramp

mark_landgraf
 

The LV had a coal transfer facility in Rochester NY  that was about twice as high. It could store and dump into hopper‎s on the sides. 

This CNW facility is a little strange in that there is not enough elevational change ‎to make the coal flow. The ramp is also very clean, unlike the LV ramp that was heavily covered in coal. Maybe the CNW facility wasn't for coal. 

Mark Landgraf
Albany NY

From: 'Charles Morrill' badlands@... [STMFC]
Sent: Tuesday, August 1, 2017 1:49 PM
To: STMFC@...
Reply To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: What type of industry is this, at the inclined ramp

 

A ramp set up like this was used to transfer bulk commodities from narrow gauge cars to standard gauge cars.  The SP had a similar facility at its narrow gauge/standard gauge interchange.
 
Charlie
 

From: Jerry Breon jbreon@... [STMFC]
Sent: Tuesday, August 01, 2017 12:15 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: What type of industry is this, at the inclined ramp
 


While I agree with the majority of group members that the incline ramp in the photo below is leading to a small, steam locomotive coaling facility, I'm wondering if there were ever any similar facilities of this era that existed for the purpose of transferring bulk commodities (coal, sand, gravel, etc.) from one freight car to another or if the need to do so even existed?

Thanks,

Jerry Breon

Mooresville, NC

 

Sat Jul 29, 2017 10:27 am (PDT) . Posted by:

"Claus Schlund" clausschlund

Hi List Members,

What type of industry is this, at the inclined ramp, being served by steam era freight cars on the C&NW?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/12294845895/sizes/o/

Claus Schlund



Re: Early Bulkhead Kit for SP Flat Car

Tony Thompson
 

Bill Welch wrote:

 

I would like to purchase an EARLY Bulkhead kit for the Southern Pacific flat cars as offered by the SP Historical Society. They are sold out of this version.


      If anyone else is looking for one or more of these, I know of a source. Please contact me OFF-LIST if interested.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: What type of industry is this, at the inclined ramp

Charles Morrill
 

A ramp set up like this was used to transfer bulk commodities from narrow gauge cars to standard gauge cars.  The SP had a similar facility at its narrow gauge/standard gauge interchange.
 
Charlie
 

From: Jerry Breon jbreon@... [STMFC]
Sent: Tuesday, August 01, 2017 12:15 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: What type of industry is this, at the inclined ramp
 


While I agree with the majority of group members that the incline ramp in the photo below is leading to a small, steam locomotive coaling facility, I'm wondering if there were ever any similar facilities of this era that existed for the purpose of transferring bulk commodities (coal, sand, gravel, etc.) from one freight car to another or if the need to do so even existed?

Thanks,

Jerry Breon

Mooresville, NC

 

Sat Jul 29, 2017 10:27 am (PDT) . Posted by:

"Claus Schlund" clausschlund

Hi List Members,

What type of industry is this, at the inclined ramp, being served by steam era freight cars on the C&NW?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/12294845895/sizes/o/

Claus Schlund


Re: What type of industry is this, at the inclined ramp

Jerry Breon
 

While I agree with the majority of group members that the incline ramp in the photo below is leading to a small, steam locomotive coaling facility, I'm wondering if there were ever any similar facilities of this era that existed for the purpose of transferring bulk commodities (coal, sand, gravel, etc.) from one freight car to another or if the need to do so even existed?

Thanks,

Jerry Breon

Mooresville, NC 


Sat Jul 29, 2017 10:27 am (PDT) . Posted by:

"Claus Schlund" clausschlund

Hi List Members,

What type of industry is this, at the inclined ramp, being served by steam era freight cars on the C&NW?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/12294845895/sizes/o/

Claus Schlund


Re: Some enjoyable steam era freight car views in the Barriger collection...

rwitt_2000
 

Still another from the CGW album id CGW444 a MKT SS box car number begins 777 ...

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/12593360955/in/album-72157641119576365/

I like how the industry is on both sides of the track.

Bob Witt


Canadian newsprint loads

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,

For those wondering what to do for a load for Canadian boxcars, this image shows what your newsprint loads should look like. It was nice of them to stack the spools so all the text and emblems are upright, don't you think?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/12306746095/sizes/o/

Claus Schlund


Re: Square Wire for Vertical Brake Staffs: Usage Verified

Bill Welch
 

Clearly a situation where two or more heads is better than one, or at least mine. Did not see these in my searching. Thank you Spen. I will see how much $ and what kind of lengths and quantities.

Bill Welch


Re: WTB: Early Bulkhead Kit for SP Flat Car

Bill Welch
 

Someone has offered me one of these kits so I am now good. Love this Group!

Bill Welch


Re: tie replacement project

Charles Morrill
 

Looking in the Western Pacific album for this negative, there is a suggestion that this is a photo of the Swayne Lumber Co. bridge over a branch of the Feather River.

Charlie

-----Original Message-----
From: 'Jack Burgess' jack@yosemitevalleyrr.com [STMFC]
Sent: Monday, July 31, 2017 8:38 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [STMFC] tie replacement project


The trees and topography scream Sierra Foothills to me. I think the location is on the Yosemite Valley Railroad. I didn't dig out a book to determine what bridge that is; when Jack Burgess chimes in we'll find out.

--
Rod Miller
Handcraftsman

Sorry, the YV didn't have a bridge like that one.

Jack Burgess




------------------------------------
Posted by: "Jack Burgess" <jack@yosemitevalleyrr.com>
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links


Re: Square Wire for Vertical Brake Staffs

Tim O'Connor
 


  I did a quick Google search and found this web site with 0.015" square wire:
  https://www.gibbswire.com/square-wire/
  I didn't look into pricing.
  Spen Kellogg


Wow, and it comes in phosphor-bronze too!

I am reminded of a very successful New England tech company called CABLETRON
(eventually absorbed by another tech giant). Their first "product" was simple
short lengths of telephone cable! They would buy giant spools, and sell shorter
lengths. Turns out no one had ever thought of this before, and they made a
small fortune. Then they started making gadgets...

Maybe some entrepeneur here can buy a 1000 ft spool of square wire... :-)

Tim O'Connor


WTB: Early Bulkhead Kit for SP Flat Car

Bill Welch
 

I would like to purchase an EARLY Bulkhead kit for the Southern Pacific flat cars as offered by the SP Historical Society. They are sold out of this version.

Please contact me OFF LIST at fgexbill(at)tampabay.rr.com if you have an extra kit you want to sell me.

Thank you!
Bill Welch


Re: I count five (5) pickle cars in this image

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi Dave,

That was a very enjoyable read!

Claus Schlund

----- Original Message -----
From: "'Dave Nelson' Lake_Muskoka@att.net [STMFC]" <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Monday, July 31, 2017 7:53 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: I count five (5) pickle cars in this image


Jeez… the things we learn – and retain -- from our hobbies. The following comments are from a study of several Sanborn maps – Chicago 1950, Vol 5, maps 39, 40, and 51, which I reviewed 5 years ago while working on a simulator route centered on Goose Island, Chicago.



This image is in Chicago and is taken at Courtland Ave (North side), looking north along the C&NW Wisconsin Div tracks. The thru bridge is over Cortland Ave. The tall building on the left is a C&NW suburban service station (the route splits right here). The MILW crossed the C&NW tracks a block south of this photo on its way to Goose Island.



The further building on the right is an ordinary loft storage facility. Foreground right is the Squire Dingee pickle factory (street address is the 1800 block of Besley Ct., ending at Courtland). The building was there in 2014 when I photographed the exterior.



Could it be somewhere else? Sure. But I’d bet money that I’m correct… too many things are a perfect match.



Dave Nelson



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Saturday, July 29, 2017 4:04 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Re: I count five (5) pickle cars in this image








I suspect those are Squire Dingee cars: see Leider, "Pickle and Vinegar Makers of the Midwest", pp 60-61.



Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.














------------------------------------
Posted by: "Dave Nelson" <lake_muskoka@att.net>
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Yahoo Groups Links

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