Date   

Re: Shorpy image with railroads in the front.

Denny Anspach <danspachmd@...>
 

Hey, you guys- Please do not post photos like this. The information overload has delayed my breakfast, not to mention the breakfasts for all others waiting on me.

One could write a book listing all the stories that this photo tells.

Denny.

Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento CA


Re: Intro Dates for C&BT, IMWX, and InterMountain 1937 Modified Kits

SUVCWORR@...
 

Bill,

Directly from the source C&BT announced 1988 NMRA convention

Rich Orr


-----Original Message-----
From: fgexbill@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Sat, Sep 2, 2017 6:41 am
Subject: [STMFC] Intro Dates for C&BT, IMWX, and InterMountain 1937 Modified Kits



Can someone here recall please the precise years that the following styrene kits were introduced to the market for sale:

The C&BT 40-foot steel car with a range of doors, roof, and ends to model the AAR boxcars built beginning in 1944.

The Innovative Model Works kit to model the Standard 1937 AAR 40-foot steel boxcar.

The InterMountain Modified 1937 AAR kit.

I will use this information in the 2018 clinic I am planning. Thank you.

Bill Welch



Re: Intro Dates for C&BT, IMWX, and InterMountain 1937 Modified Kits

destorzek@...
 

All between 1986 and about 1992 or so. I was in Dick's shop when they were working on tooling for the AAR car, looking for a source of toolmaking services for what was to become the Accurail line.

The IMWX kit came out a couple years after Intermountain, tooled by Intermountain for one of the original partners.

Not sure about Intermountain's own car, likely shortly after Front Range failed. 

Sorry I can't ger any closer on the dates.

Dennis Storzek


---In STMFC@..., <fgexbill@...> wrote :

Can someone here recall please the precise years that the following styrene kits were introduced to the market for sale:

The C&BT 40-foot steel car with a range of doors, roof, and ends to model the AAR boxcars built beginning in 1944.

The Innovative Model Works kit to model the Standard 1937 AAR 40-foot steel boxcar.

The InterMountain Modified 1937 AAR kit.

I will use this information in the 2018 clinic I am planning. Thank you.

Bill Welch


Masking Tape Overview

Bill Welch
 

Here is a Youtube video from a fine modeler on his favorite Masking Tape: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wbq9fOa4Jwk


Bill Welch



Re: Intro Dates for C&BT, IMWX, and InterMountain 1937 Modified Kits

Bill Welch
 

I am not covering those kits in my presentation.

Bill Welch


Re: Intro Dates for C&BT, IMWX, and InterMountain 1937 Modified Kits

O Fenton Wells
 

Don't forget about McKeen and Front Range also

On Sat, Sep 2, 2017 at 9:27 AM, O Fenton Wells <srrfan1401@...> wrote:
Bill, there were a whole series of articles on those manufacturers in Railmodel Journal and Model Railroading in the '80's and early 90's. I have some of them.  I believe Thompson and Hendrickson did many of them.  I can help but I'm sure others can provide the ones I don't have.
Fenton

On Sat, Sep 2, 2017 at 6:41 AM, fgexbill@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Can someone here recall please the precise years that the following styrene kits were introduced to the market for sale:


The C&BT 40-foot steel car with a range of doors, roof, and ends to model the AAR boxcars built beginning in 1944.

The Innovative Model Works kit to model the Standard 1937 AAR 40-foot steel boxcar.

The InterMountain Modified 1937 AAR kit.

I will use this information in the 2018 clinic I am planning. Thank you.

Bill Welch




--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...



--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...


Re: Intro Dates for C&BT, IMWX, and InterMountain 1937 Modified Kits

O Fenton Wells
 

Bill, there were a whole series of articles on those manufacturers in Railmodel Journal and Model Railroading in the '80's and early 90's. I have some of them.  I believe Thompson and Hendrickson did many of them.  I can help but I'm sure others can provide the ones I don't have.
Fenton

On Sat, Sep 2, 2017 at 6:41 AM, fgexbill@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Can someone here recall please the precise years that the following styrene kits were introduced to the market for sale:


The C&BT 40-foot steel car with a range of doors, roof, and ends to model the AAR boxcars built beginning in 1944.

The Innovative Model Works kit to model the Standard 1937 AAR 40-foot steel boxcar.

The InterMountain Modified 1937 AAR kit.

I will use this information in the 2018 clinic I am planning. Thank you.

Bill Welch




--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...


Re: URTX and MILW, M&StL, SOO, CGW leased reefers: A Pool Arrangement?

anthony wagner
 

When I worked at CNW's 40th Street yard in Chicago in the early 1970s empty PFE reefers were sent to W F Hall Printing Company to load magazines and catalogs going to the west coast. Some of the the names I recall were Playboy, Sears catalog, and Montgomery Ward catalog. I was told by the chief clerk that not only did they get a better rate by using reefers that would have otherwise moved empty but also that the printed material was insulated from changes in humidity during its trip west. I don't remember how many cars were usually loaded but Halls was switched every night. We got a stack of the new issue of Playboy every month from Halls as a bonus for good service. Tony Wagner


On Friday, September 1, 2017 9:12 PM, "jcdworkingonthenp@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
      To build on what Ted stated, I had presented both at Chicagoland and Cocoa on national reefer movements with info taken from 1956 and 1957 AAR monthly reports. These are the only reports in a series I have found to date, and I model as I have stated prior Sept/Oct 1953, so these are applicable to only some degree.
……….
Quotes taken directly from AAR monthly reports (again found only for 1956-1957)
January 1956 First week of January was heavy for potatoes this season with 4000 loads shipped. No surplus of reefers noted in any loading districts.  Most in protected service.
Feb 20, 1956 “Northern-Belt states (1) heavy and strong use of reefers in protected service continues.”
March 20, 1956 “Northern belt states use of reefers remains strong and because of that, there are car shortages and delayed car placement being reported in the southwest.”
April 20, 1956 “No surplus of cars however all demands are being met.” 1,216 or 5.2% of national fleet out for repair
May 21, 1956 “The heaviest demands for refrigerator cars normally shifts from the Northern-Belt States to the Southeastern, Gulf, and Southwestern states during April and May.”
June 20, 1956 “There has been practically no letup in the demand for refrigerator cars since the first week in January.  Market demand for potatoes became strong during movements of the old potato crops from Maine and Idaho, and continues strong for new potatoes loading from California and Arizona.” (2)
July 20, 1956 Use of refrigerator cars was moderately heavy during June averaging 31,688 cars loaded each week and while heavy, it was below the weekly average of 32,046 car loads for Jan 1 to June 30. Included in the reports were 53,786 carloads of Bananas originating at US ports in the 1st half of this year.
August 21, 1956 Local home-grown produce is reducing the need for shipping from distant areas.  Middle-West, Allegheny, and North Atlantic states have excellent growing conditions and local supplies are plentiful. Normal summer low loading began in July”…. (And this was interesting, as I mentioned in the presentation, if you are modeling late July/August, perhaps some reefers should be sidelined, unless they are in protected service, protecting their commodity against high heat.)
Sept 20, 1956, Heaviest car loading period of the year - except for reefers.
October 25, 1956 Idaho loading of potatoes, apples, and onions greater than 1200 carloads per week, Red River Valley (MN/ND border) potatoes are at 1000 carloads a week and will be steady at that rate for some time. Most of Maine potatoes are being stored, some movement in Sept., however takes off in December lasting to April.
December 20, 1956 Potato loading greater than 1500 per week in Maine, peaked at 1200 per week in Idaho and the Red River Valley. Northern states put demands on protected service and perishables other than fresh fruit and vegetables.
February 20, 1957 Frozen food loading, including fruits and berries, vegetables, dressed poultry, etc. amounted to 25,116 carloads the first three quarters of 1956, an increase of 8.2% over same time of 1955.  A 13.4% increase is forecast for 1957. Since middle of January, loading requirements show increasing need in fresh fruit and vegetable shipping areas. Florida, Red River Valley, Maine, California, and Idaho needs will rise for the next eight weeks.
March 20, 1957, Protected service demands continue with moderately heavy carloading estimated for Florida and Arizona during late March. Loading in Florida est. to be 3,500/week by April. California and Arizona will rise to 3,900.  Stored potatoes estimated to move from Maine, Idaho, and Red River valley in March and April, same time FL, TX, and AZ will see heaviest loading.
    Therefore, all refrigerators will be in service at that time. (No reefers out for servicing)
*Northern Belt states defined as states north of Mason-Dixie Line.
    Other reefer uses were use of reefers Ted listed.  Magazines, plants, flowers, cigarettes, and even tires, and matches used reefers for shipment. Freight forwarders took advantage of the return empty rates on refrigerators and used these cars. Freight moved in refrigerator cars via protected service fall to spring in the northern US and Canada and must filtered south. 
I thought I had uploaded a list of commodities that use protected service (for protection against both heat and cold) however found it empty and so reloaded it. Here:
Such a list also exists in the PFE book.
My conclusion stated at the end of the presentation were: There are many, many possibilities to use refrigerator cars beyond use only in perishable commodity use. Doing such limits your realistic application of your rolling stock
………………
(1) Northern Belt states defined as north of the Mason-Dixie line.
(2) Of potatoes, and their seemingly year round movement. From research there seems to be early,(also called new), mid and late season potatoes. Early and new like the Kern Valley, CA potatoes seem to be shipped directly to market with mid-season stored somewhat and late season OK to be stored for many months, then shipped. If we have a horticulturalist or potato grower on this list, I would be happy to hear more, and if it could be stated with respect to this list’s time frame, all the better.  
Reason for the interest in potatoes is that this seems to be the one perishable commodity that moves year round. Most of us on this list have eaten potatoes several times this week already and so I would petition that it makes that the one possible most likely reefer load we all could use on our railroad.
                                                                                                              Jim Dick – St. Paul
To those that would ask about us that present if we could upload our PowerPoint presentations, I would be happy to except like most presenters, have copyrighted images use granted for educational display at said conventions only - in our presentations. I do and to cut those out I feel leaves jumps in the rhythm of the presentation.     



Intro Dates for C&BT, IMWX, and InterMountain 1937 Modified Kits

Bill Welch
 

Can someone here recall please the precise years that the following styrene kits were introduced to the market for sale:

The C&BT 40-foot steel car with a range of doors, roof, and ends to model the AAR boxcars built beginning in 1944.

The Innovative Model Works kit to model the Standard 1937 AAR 40-foot steel boxcar.

The InterMountain Modified 1937 AAR kit.

I will use this information in the 2018 clinic I am planning. Thank you.

Bill Welch


Re: Announcement from Yarmouth Model Works

Pierre Oliver
 

We have plans for at least 4 more ACF built cars after the ones shown.
They point is to showoff the ACF proprietary roof and end we had created.
The Wabash 12 panel car is still in production, so you haven't "missed" anything yet

Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com
On 9/01/17 8:15 PM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] wrote:

�


Will you be doing any more ACF "dimple end" box cars? I missed
the Wabash car you did ... Also any plans on doing any cars with
the ACF "carbuilder roof"?

Tim O'Connor

>Please see the blog;
>
>http://elgincarshops.blogspot.ca/2017/09/well-heres-plan.html
>
>Pierre Oliver



Re: Improving 40-foot Steel Boxcars: circa 1985 and 2018

Bill Welch
 

I have what I need now. FYI the article was in the April 1982 issue of RMC, three years earlier than I remembered. Thank you to the several people who offered or provided help with this request.

Bill Welch


Re: URTX and MILW, M&StL, SOO, CGW leased reefers: A Pool Arrangement?

D. Scott Chatfield
 

Dennis Storzek wrote:

>I don't think any of the granger roads originated enough reefer loads to really worry about it....

Hmmm, there's this liquid stuff called "beer" that was and still is made in large quantities in those parts, and was shipped in ice reefers in those days.


Scott Chatfield


Re: Announcement from Yarmouth Model Works

Bill Welch
 

Both of Yarmouth's Wabash kits are still available Tim.

BTW the West India Fruit car can be done in two schemes—traditional boxcar red/brown w/white stenciling and Green with yellow lettering.

Bill Welch


Re: URTX and MILW, M&StL, SOO, CGW leased reefers: A Pool Arrangement?

np328
 

      To build on what Ted stated, I had presented both at Chicagoland and Cocoa on national reefer movements with info taken from 1956 and 1957 AAR monthly reports. These are the only reports in a series I have found to date, and I model as I have stated prior Sept/Oct 1953, so these are applicable to only some degree.

……….

Quotes taken directly from AAR monthly reports (again found only for 1956-1957)

January 1956 First week of January was heavy for potatoes this season with 4000 loads shipped. No surplus of reefers noted in any loading districts.  Most in protected service.

Feb 20, 1956 “Northern-Belt states (1) heavy and strong use of reefers in protected service continues.”

March 20, 1956 “Northern belt states use of reefers remains strong and because of that, there are car shortages and delayed car placement being reported in the southwest.”

April 20, 1956 “No surplus of cars however all demands are being met.” 1,216 or 5.2% of national fleet out for repair

May 21, 1956 “The heaviest demands for refrigerator cars normally shifts from the Northern-Belt States to the Southeastern, Gulf, and Southwestern states during April and May.”

June 20, 1956 “There has been practically no letup in the demand for refrigerator cars since the first week in January.  Market demand for potatoes became strong during movements of the old potato crops from Maine and Idaho, and continues strong for new potatoes loading from California and Arizona.” (2)

July 20, 1956 Use of refrigerator cars was moderately heavy during June averaging 31,688 cars loaded each week and while heavy, it was below the weekly average of 32,046 car loads for Jan 1 to June 30. Included in the reports were 53,786 carloads of Bananas originating at US ports in the 1st half of this year.

August 21, 1956 Local home-grown produce is reducing the need for shipping from distant areas.  Middle-West, Allegheny, and North Atlantic states have excellent growing conditions and local supplies are plentiful. Normal summer low loading began in July”…. (And this was interesting, as I mentioned in the presentation, if you are modeling late July/August, perhaps some reefers should be sidelined, unless they are in protected service, protecting their commodity against high heat.)

Sept 20, 1956, Heaviest car loading period of the year - except for reefers.

October 25, 1956 Idaho loading of potatoes, apples, and onions greater than 1200 carloads per week, Red River Valley (MN/ND border) potatoes are at 1000 carloads a week and will be steady at that rate for some time. Most of Maine potatoes are being stored, some movement in Sept., however takes off in December lasting to April.

December 20, 1956 Potato loading greater than 1500 per week in Maine, peaked at 1200 per week in Idaho and the Red River Valley. Northern states put demands on protected service and perishables other than fresh fruit and vegetables.

February 20, 1957 Frozen food loading, including fruits and berries, vegetables, dressed poultry, etc. amounted to 25,116 carloads the first three quarters of 1956, an increase of 8.2% over same time of 1955.  A 13.4% increase is forecast for 1957. Since middle of January, loading requirements show increasing need in fresh fruit and vegetable shipping areas. Florida, Red River Valley, Maine, California, and Idaho needs will rise for the next eight weeks.

March 20, 1957, Protected service demands continue with moderately heavy carloading estimated for Florida and Arizona during late March. Loading in Florida est. to be 3,500/week by April. California and Arizona will rise to 3,900.  Stored potatoes estimated to move from Maine, Idaho, and Red River valley in March and April, same time FL, TX, and AZ will see heaviest loading.

    Therefore, all refrigerators will be in service at that time. (No reefers out for servicing)

*Northern Belt states defined as states north of Mason-Dixie Line.

    Other reefer uses were use of reefers Ted listed.  Magazines, plants, flowers, cigarettes, and even tires, and matches used reefers for shipment. Freight forwarders took advantage of the return empty rates on refrigerators and used these cars. Freight moved in refrigerator cars via protected service fall to spring in the northern US and Canada and must filtered south. 

I thought I had uploaded a list of commodities that use protected service (for protection against both heat and cold) however found it empty and so reloaded it. Here:

https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/STMFC/files/Perishable%20Commodities%2C%20definition%20and%20list%20of%20/

Such a list also exists in the PFE book.

My conclusion stated at the end of the presentation were: There are many, many possibilities to use refrigerator cars beyond use only in perishable commodity use. Doing such limits your realistic application of your rolling stock

………………

(1) Northern Belt states defined as north of the Mason-Dixie line.

(2) Of potatoes, and their seemingly year round movement. From research there seems to be early,(also called new), mid and late season potatoes. Early and new like the Kern Valley, CA potatoes seem to be shipped directly to market with mid-season stored somewhat and late season OK to be stored for many months, then shipped. If we have a horticulturalist or potato grower on this list, I would be happy to hear more, and if it could be stated with respect to this list’s time frame, all the better.  

Reason for the interest in potatoes is that this seems to be the one perishable commodity that moves year round. Most of us on this list have eaten potatoes several times this week already and so I would petition that it makes that the one possible most likely reefer load we all could use on our railroad.

                                                                                                              Jim Dick – St. Paul

To those that would ask about us that present if we could upload our PowerPoint presentations, I would be happy to except like most presenters, have copyrighted images use granted for educational display at said conventions only - in our presentations. I do and to cut those out I feel leaves jumps in the rhythm of the presentation.     


Re: Shorpy image with railroads in the front.

Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)
 

Hi List Members,

An enjoyable image indeed.

Are those milk cans on the platform in the lower right of the image?

Claus Schlund

----- Original Message -----
From: "destorzek@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Friday, September 01, 2017 2:08 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Shorpy image with railroads in the front.


---In STMFC@..., <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote :
http://www.shorpy.com/node/22446?size=_original#caption http://www.shorpy.com/node/22446?size=_original#caption
======================
I like the folding stacks on Pacific No.2... And the high speed switching operation in the foreground... The cars are a blur :-)
Dennis Storzek


Re: URTX and MILW, M&StL, SOO, CGW leased reefers: A Pool Arrangement?

rwitt_2000
 

A good discussion.

Dennis I would suggest for one the canning industry there was a rush. When the crops were ready to harvest it went quickly. For Wisconsin I recall peas and sweet corn as major crops. I believe the crops were harvested, went to the cannery, were canned and shipped to warehouses of the major grocery stores and independent labels. Canned goods were not stored by the canneries. The pea and corn seasons would a few weeks each. This would require extra reefers to meet these seasonal spikes.

Regards,

Bob Witt


Re: Shorpy image with railroads in the front.

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Somewhere it says 1912.



Schuyler




What is the date of the image? I can't even make
out if any of the
tall buildings is the Carnegie building, the
city's first "skyscraper"
(1893) and now there are dozens of them! But I see
only a handful of
early autos, and a bunch of horses and carts.
Maybe around 1910?
What a photo!



http://www.shorpy.com/node/22446?size=_original#ca
ption

Schuyler


Re: Announcement from Yarmouth Model Works

Tim O'Connor
 

Will you be doing any more ACF "dimple end" box cars? I missed
the Wabash car you did ... Also any plans on doing any cars with
the ACF "carbuilder roof"?

Tim O'Connor


Re: Shorpy image with railroads in the front.

Tim O'Connor
 


What is the date of the image? I can't even make out if any of the
tall buildings is the Carnegie building, the city's first "skyscraper"
(1893) and now there are dozens of them! But I see only a handful of
early autos, and a bunch of horses and carts. Maybe around 1910?
What a photo!



Re: Shorpy image with railroads in the front.

Larry Smith
 

The American Queen, a passenger cruise riverboat has folding stacks and is operating today.  They lower the stacks for not only bridges but for power lines.


Larry Smith

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