Date   

New HO scale SP flat car kits

Eric Hansmann
 

Owl Mountain Models has a couple nice Southern Pacific flat car kits coming very soon in HO scale. Check out the details on the Resin Car Works blog.

http://blog.resincarworks.com/new-southern-pacific-flat-car-models/



Eric Hansmann
RCW web guy


Re: Bulkhead Flats & Wallboard

William Dale
 

The Reading started in 1953 converting four of their FMe class of flats, 9204, 9212, 9230, and 9233.  There was an article done on building these in HO, years back.

Bill


Re: NYC Boxcars: The Star Stencil

Jack Mullen
 

Bob,
Terry Link's Canada Southern website is a handy and reliable  resource for NYC data and photos. His page discussing freight car painting  http://www.canadasouthern.com/caso/NYC-MODELS-FREIGHT-PAINT.htm  has this, with citation of prototype source: "A STAR under the oval herald indicates car used in grain service as per note #2 in drawing book J-56487 - section 2 - page 15."

FWIW, looking at somewhere between 30 and 40 NYC boxcar photos, I found only two with a star marking. One of these, NYC 168729 with a 4-52 reweigh, was lettered with the "Pacemaker Freight Service" slogan, but was in ordinary BCR with full dimensional data as required for interchange. The other is 175000, a plain AAR boxcar NEW 2-45, with a WHEN EMPTY RETURN TO BUFFALO stencil.  None of the photos of the red/gray Pacemaker cars had the star mark.  

Jack Mullen


Re: PRR X23, X25 and B&O M-26 photo

devansprr
 

Bruce,

Interesting point - might also be indicative of the condition of much of the rest of the RR's equipment and property.

But then you also wonder how much of the soot in Tony's photo might be washed away by a strong rain? Looks like the tank cars have avoided the massive soot accumulation. Different train, different location in the consist, or different weather? Or would rain soak the soot into the wood, and tarp, rather than wash it off?
 
Dave Evans


Re: PRR X23, X25 and B&O M-26 photo

devansprr
 

Jeff,

Wow - thank-you for the link. Tony - thank you for the picture/blog post. That could explain a lot....

Soot on the tarped load suggests the cars were traveling right to left. Tarp is leeward end.

Dave Evans


Re: PRR X23, X25 and B&O M-26 photo

Steve Haas
 

 

Tim O’ comments:


>>A single trip through all of the tunnels on the SP's mountain grades in Oregon
and California could definitely deposit a good load of soot onto a freight car.
It doesn't require weeks. :-) Cool photo, and definitely a good modeling idea!<<

 

I’m with Tim on this – doesn’t take much in the right environment to dirty up a Steam Era Freight Car pretty quickly.

 

I am reminded of Richard Hendrickson’s article on “Vintage Dating of Freight Cars” or a title to that effect in RMJ or ‘Ding..  That issue is usually nearby, but due to current household projects I have no idea where it is at the moment – I believe it was in the mid to late nineties, but I reserve the right to be wrong, and would welcome a correction on that topic.

 

In that article, Richard discussed several things, and provided photographic examples of many of them, including (but not limited to) the following:

 

1)      The only pristine car in your fleet is the one that _just_ rolled out of _your_ paint shop.  In the steam era, it will have some degree of dirt and grime within hours.

2)      New cars built by a builder will be dirty to some degree before they make it to your railroad.

3)      Any given lot of cars will have various degrees of weathering – each of those cars has had a unique journey through the elements.

4)      The older the lot of cars, the more dirtier the lot will be – again with variations.

5)      Reweigh dates also serve as a dating tool.

6)      Pay attention to a given railroad’s repainting schedule – some railroads had a ten year cycle, others had different cycles.  

7)      And even when a given series of cars is scheduled to be repainted, there is no guarantee that any given car will make it home to be repainted.

 

Bottom line is that just about any given series of cars in the STMFC era will have a wide variety of weathering.

 

Having said all that, there are untold degrees and variations of weathering.  One that comes to mind is ore cars on the iron ranges of Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Northern Michigan.  While exposed to the steam and diesel exhaust of their respective periods, these cars, due to captive service, will exhibit a lot of iron ore dust as their primary weathering as compared to equipment operating in other environments.  I submit for discussion that only equipment in localized, captive service would have any consistency in weathering across the consist of a given train.

 

Best regards,

 

Steve

 

Steve Haas

Snoqualmie, WA

 


Re: PRR X23, X25 and B&O M-26 photo

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Jeff, the car behind it looks like it’s been “sooted” pretty well, too!

 

Schuyler

 

Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: PRR X23, X25 and B&O M-26 photo

 

  Dave,

 

               In one of Tony Thompson’s recent blog postings, I was struck by the appearance of a flat car load of lumber.  There was a significant coating of soot on the top of the load.

               If I assume that this car was a “roller” and roamed the rails for a three or four weeks, that would indicate that any car over a month old should have a pretty grimy roof.

 The photo may be seen here:

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-oXGAZ80oqjg/VW46BFgipSI/AAAAAAAAJHQ/8040YOtxqPI/s1600/Celanese%2Bcolor.jpg

 Regards,

 -Jeff

 


Re: access to readingmodeler.com ???

James E Kubanick
 

Bill,

Thank you for your help.

Jim


On Saturday, September 9, 2017 9:11 PM, "williamdale75@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Johannes, Jim, I will send Mr. Jacobs a message about the signing up issue.  I know he is quite busily building an impressive layout.

Bill



Re: PRR X23, X25 and B&O M-26 photo

Bruce Smith
 

​Dave,


I think it is more about year than anything else.  So for 1944-46, I think that abused heavily weathered cars are pretty common.  Delano's photos were taken earlier in the war and reflect a less hard worked fleet that still shows the results of pre-war, depression era, maintenance... and by that I mean that many railroads kept the shop folks busy painting and repairing idle cars, in part financed by the government so immediately pre-war the freight car fleet was probably in better than average condition with respect to paint and weathering.


Regards

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL


From: STMFC@... on behalf of devans1@... [STMFC]
Sent: Saturday, September 9, 2017 9:01 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: PRR X23, X25 and B&O M-26 photo
 


Bruce,

I agree, and perhaps a obvious observation to this group - but when you look at some of Delano's Proviso yard photos there are at least some freshly painted cars, or at least they appear to be recently painted (or perhaps washed by a heavy rain?) I have been wondering just how many (or few) cars to leave un-weathered, or lightly weathered for a WWII layout. Delano's photos had convinced me that at least 5, and maybe 10 percent should have minimal weathering.

But in this collection - I am not sure I have spotted a single clean car, and a bunch where the reporting marks are pretty hard to make out - even when they are big enough to be legible. I have wondered how much of the "Weathering" was actually just soot from the last few days run, easily washed off in a strong rain... Soft coal ash is often sticky (constituents not fully burned), so the airflow may not knock it off the sides.

I think in some of Delano's Proviso yard pictures there was evidence of snow on the roofs of some cars (recent arrivals from? - likely moving through a damp or wet environment) and I do not recall so many reporting marks being so hard to read - so I am wondering if recent, but temporary, soot accumulation was a significant component of WWII "weathering."

Dave Evans


NYC Boxcars: The Star Stencil

thecitrusbelt@...
 

I've read two conflicting accounts about the meaning of a star appearing below the NYC oval on boxcars.

 

One account says this designates a boxcar that is to remain on NYC rails, such as a Pacemaker boxcar. Another account says the star indicates a car used in grain service.

 

Which one is right, or is there another meaning for the star?

 

Thanks.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: PRR X23, X25 and B&O M-26 photo

Paul Koehler
 

Greg:

 

Picture was taken at Taylor Yard; car in question is spotted at the RIP track.  As mentioned by Tim in all probability its diesel soot deposited while traveling through the many tunnels from Oregon to Los Angeles.

 

Paul C. Koehler

 


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Sunday, September 10, 2017 10:31 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: PRR X23, X25 and B&O M-26 photo

 

 

Hey Yuze Gize,

 

In my opinion it doesn't have to take a badly fired steam engine to have the amount of crud, be it steam soot or spent diesel smoke to accumulate on the top of a load of lumber like this. The scene posted ~appears~ to be Eugene and the origin of the load might likely be one of SP's coastal lines like Tillamook, and with the amount of precipitation and tunnels that the train would have to traverse this could be a two day occurrence. The precipitation embeds the crud into the top layers of lumber on it way to Brooklyn then Eugene and then points eat over the tunnels on the Willamette past or over Mount Ashland... Next Roseville and choose your poison boys the Sierra Nevada's, the Great Salt Lake or the Tehachapi's.  It get cruddy, it stays cruddy and if you are a young man of  twenty something and you have to strip these cars and prep for the lumber lines in the yard flipping the top boards and re-banding the units make you a pretty grungy guy when you head home. SO believe it this is weathering 101.

 

I will agree with Armand, weathering is a matter of choice but realism is realism and as they say model from photos...

 

Greg Martin  

 

Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean

 

Tony Thompson writes:

"It would only take a few miles near a steam engine being badly fired to do that. I don't think it typical.

Tony Thompson"


Re: PRR X23, X25 and B&O M-26 photo

Greg Martin
 

Hey Yuze Gize,
 
In my opinion it doesn't have to take a badly fired steam engine to have the amount of crud, be it steam soot or spent diesel smoke to accumulate on the top of a load of lumber like this. The scene posted ~appears~ to be Eugene and the origin of the load might likely be one of SP's coastal lines like Tillamook, and with the amount of precipitation and tunnels that the train would have to traverse this could be a two day occurrence. The precipitation embeds the crud into the top layers of lumber on it way to Brooklyn then Eugene and then points eat over the tunnels on the Willamette past or over Mount Ashland... Next Roseville and choose your poison boys the Sierra Nevada's, the Great Salt Lake or the Tehachapi's.  It get cruddy, it stays cruddy and if you are a young man of  twenty something and you have to strip these cars and prep for the lumber lines in the yard flipping the top boards and re-banding the units make you a pretty grungy guy when you head home. SO believe it this is weathering 101.
 
I will agree with Armand, weathering is a matter of choice but realism is realism and as they say model from photos...
 
Greg Martin  
 
Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean
 
Tony Thompson writes:

"It would only take a few miles near a steam engine being badly fired to do that. I don't think it typical.
Tony Thompson"


Re: PRR X23, X25 and B&O M-26 photo

Tim O'Connor
 

Jeff

A single trip through all of the tunnels on the SP's mountain grades in Oregon
and California could definitely deposit a good load of soot onto a freight car.
It doesn't require weeks. :-) Cool photo, and definitely a good modeling idea!

Tim O'


In one of Tony Thompson’s recent blog postings, I was struck by the appearance of a flat car load of lumber. There was a significant coating of soot on the top of the load. If I assume that this car was a “roller� and roamed the rails for a three or four weeks, that would indicate that any car over a month old should have a pretty grimy roof.
 
The photo may be seen here:
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-oXGAZ80oqjg/VW46BFgipSI/AAAAAAAAJHQ/8040YOtxqPI/s1600/Celanese%2Bcolor.jpg
 
Regards,
 
-Jeff


Re: Bulkhead Flats & Wallboard

Jeffrey White
 

The IC converted 27 53 foot flats from the 60500-60999 series for wallboard loading in 1946. The car diagram says numbers were at random. They had 6'6" bulkheads added to the ends.

In 1958 they did 50 more cars from the 60000-60099 series. Again it says random numbers.

Later in 1958 they took 13 cars from that series and put 8 '6 1/2"  bulkheads on them.

100 more cars 60100-60199 were built in 1959.

Jeff White

Alma, IL



On 9/10/2017 12:47 AM, thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] wrote:
 

This is a link to a June 17, 1950, Railway Age article comparing the cost of shipping wallboard by bulkhead flat versus a boxcar:

 

https://books.google.com/books?id=rOslAAAAMAAJ&pg=RA10-PA51&lpg=RA10-PA51&dq=sheetrock+%22flat+car%22&source=bl&ots=RRl6996fVA&sig=-XzDRAu_NVzVlaDg75hCaSxKBbg&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi2zsqc8JnWAhVH3mMKHVy5BwcQ6AEIQjAH#v=onepage&q=sheetrock%20%22flat%20car%22&f=false

 

or

 

http://tinyurl.com/ycefqhm5

 

Note that what I am calling wallboard the article calls gypsum board. The article is about a U.S. Gypsum Company product that the company brand name has been Sheetrock since 1917.

 

Does anyone know when bulkhead flatcars (such as noted in the article rather than pulpwood cars) first emerged in quantity on U.S. railroads? It appears that this would be sometime after 1950, when 200 such cars were in service.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA



Re: PRR X23, X25 and B&O M-26 photo

Armand Premo
 

Again it's pretty much of individual taste . Overly weathered cars tend to stand out  much like brightly colored cars. Moderately weathered cars  are  my preference Too each it's own. Armand Premo

On Sun, Sep 10, 2017 at 9:17 AM, 'Charles Morrill' badlands@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Judging from the diesel age lettering on the cabooses in the background there would have not been many steam engines around to provide the “soot”.
Charlie
From: Tony Thompson tony@... [STMFC]
Sent: Sunday, September 10, 2017 12:57 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: PRR X23, X25 and B&O M-26 photo
 


It would only take a few miles near a steam engine being badly fired to do that. I don't think it typical.
Tony Thompson


On Sep 9, 2017, at 10:04 PM, 'Aley, Jeff A' Jeff.A.Aley@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Dave,

               In one of Tony Thompson’s recent blog postings, I was struck by the appearance of a flat car load of lumber.  There was a significant coating of soot on the top of the load.

               If I assume that this car was a “roller” and roamed the rails for a three or four weeks, that would indicate that any car over a month old should have a pretty grimy roof.

The photo may be seen here:

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-oXGAZ80oqjg/VW46BFgipSI/AAAAAAAAJHQ/8040YOtxqPI/s1600/Celanese%2Bcolor.jpg

Regards,

-Jeff

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Saturday, September 09, 2017 7:02 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: PRR X23, X25 and B&O M-26 photo

 

Bruce,

I agree, and perhaps a obvious observation to this group - but when you look at some of Delano's Proviso yard photos there are at least some freshly painted cars, or at least they appear to be recently painted (or perhaps washed by a heavy rain?) I have been wondering just how many (or few) cars to leave un-weathered, or lightly weathered for a WWII layout. Delano's photos had convinced me that at least 5, and maybe 10 percent should have minimal weathering.

But in this collection - I am not sure I have spotted a single clean car, and a bunch where the reporting marks are pretty hard to make out - even when they are big enough to be legible. I have wondered how much of the "Weathering" was actually just soot from the last few days run, easily washed off in a strong rain... Soft coal ash is often sticky (constituents not fully burned), so the airflow may not knock it off the sides.

I think in some of Delano's Proviso yard pictures there was evidence of snow on the roofs of some cars (recent arrivals from? - likely moving through a damp or wet environment) and I do not recall so many reporting marks being so hard to read - so I am wondering if recent, but temporary, soot accumulation was a significant component of WWII "weathering."

Dave Evans



Re: PRR X23, X25 and B&O M-26 photo

Charles Morrill
 

Judging from the diesel age lettering on the cabooses in the background there would have not been many steam engines around to provide the “soot”.
Charlie

From: Tony Thompson tony@... [STMFC]
Sent: Sunday, September 10, 2017 12:57 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: PRR X23, X25 and B&O M-26 photo
 


It would only take a few miles near a steam engine being badly fired to do that. I don't think it typical.
Tony Thompson


On Sep 9, 2017, at 10:04 PM, 'Aley, Jeff A' Jeff.A.Aley@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Dave,

               In one of Tony Thompson’s recent blog postings, I was struck by the appearance of a flat car load of lumber.  There was a significant coating of soot on the top of the load.

               If I assume that this car was a “roller” and roamed the rails for a three or four weeks, that would indicate that any car over a month old should have a pretty grimy roof.

The photo may be seen here:

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-oXGAZ80oqjg/VW46BFgipSI/AAAAAAAAJHQ/8040YOtxqPI/s1600/Celanese%2Bcolor.jpg

Regards,

-Jeff

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Saturday, September 09, 2017 7:02 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: PRR X23, X25 and B&O M-26 photo

 

Bruce,

I agree, and perhaps a obvious observation to this group - but when you look at some of Delano's Proviso yard photos there are at least some freshly painted cars, or at least they appear to be recently painted (or perhaps washed by a heavy rain?) I have been wondering just how many (or few) cars to leave un-weathered, or lightly weathered for a WWII layout. Delano's photos had convinced me that at least 5, and maybe 10 percent should have minimal weathering.

But in this collection - I am not sure I have spotted a single clean car, and a bunch where the reporting marks are pretty hard to make out - even when they are big enough to be legible. I have wondered how much of the "Weathering" was actually just soot from the last few days run, easily washed off in a strong rain... Soft coal ash is often sticky (constituents not fully burned), so the airflow may not knock it off the sides.

I think in some of Delano's Proviso yard pictures there was evidence of snow on the roofs of some cars (recent arrivals from? - likely moving through a damp or wet environment) and I do not recall so many reporting marks being so hard to read - so I am wondering if recent, but temporary, soot accumulation was a significant component of WWII "weathering."

Dave Evans


Re: access to readingmodeler.com ???

vapeurchapelon
 

Many thanks Bill! Would be just great when this problem can be solved!
 
Johannes
 
Gesendet: Sonntag, 10. September 2017 um 03:11 Uhr
Von: "williamdale75@... [STMFC]"
An: STMFC@...
Betreff: [STMFC] Re: access to readingmodeler.com ???
 

Johannes, Jim, I will send Mr. Jacobs a message about the signing up issue.  I know he is quite busily building an impressive layout.

Bill


Re: Bulkhead Flats & Wallboard

Douglas Harding
 

From notes made by Gene Green regarding MSTL flat cars converted to “plasterboard” service:

 

23501-23799 - Some of these cars were later converted to piggyback flats or bulkhead flats for plasterboard loading. (these are all AAR 53’ 3”, or similar, cars built by the railroad or by Hyman-Michaels. Use the Proto2000 flatcar for an HO model)

 

23501-23799 - On September 7, 1954 J.W. Devins wrote as follows to W.W. Landmesser, "...You may now proceed and select fifteen of our flat cars and improve them as contemplated, subject to the following:

 

(A) At the outset, it is unnecessary to furnish a joint material locker at one end, as this facility does not seem to be standard insofar as concerns the other railroads.

 

(B) Dunnage strap anchors may be provided in accordance with your judgement as to the best practice to follow.

 

(C) It is our understanding, to bring about the necessary changes and alterations in the fifteen cars above referred to, there will be an outlay of approximately $8,500.00.

 

It will be unnecessary to make any changes in respect of the fifteen flat cars we now use and operate in the transportation of Gypsum board.

 

We will accordingly approve an appropriate AFE.

 

Enclosed herewith are all of the prints which have been given us, and which bear on the subject herein under consideration."

 

The cars so converted but not renumbered (renumbering would come later) were 23533, 23537, 23675, 23677, 23687, 23689, 23719, 23737, 23741, 23751, 23771, 23773, 23781, 23789 and 23795. The work was done at Marshalltown between November 12 and December 8, 1954 and, as soon as each car was converted, it was dispatched immediately to Fort Dodge, Iowa for loading. The bulkheads were constructed of structural steel and assembly was by welding. The only commercial part was 54 MacLean-Fogg lading strap anchors per car.

Tracing the bulkhead flat cars is difficult because apparently some were converted but not renumbered and then later renumbered and given a separate entry in The Official Railway Equipment Register. Still later the inside length listing in The Official Railway Equipment Register was changed from 53'-6" to 48'-6" and, finally, some were converted back to FM flat cars with a 53'-6" inside length. With that in mind, let's take a look at what information can be gleaned from M&StL equipment diagrams, annual reports, Railway Age, The Official Railway Equipment Register and the M&StL's employee magazine.

 

The 16001 series were converted from 23501 series flat cars by the M&StL. The first thirty bulkhead flats originally had inside lengths (between bulkheads) as follows: Seven cars - 44'-8", eight cars - 46'-0" and 15 cars - 48'-8". It would be interesting to know if these variations were simply the whim of the shop forces at the time or addressed the needs of a specific type of lading. It is my understanding that these cars were converted especially for hauling plasterboard (drywall or sheet rock) from Fort Dodge in a pool arrangement with the CGW and IC.

 

1 - 45 cars from the series 23501 to 23799, had bulkheads added in late 1954 and early 1955.

 

2 - These cars were renumbered around January 1956 and were thereafter listed separately in The Official Railway Equipment Register.

 

3 - The inside length varied among cars and the listing in The Official Railway Equipment Register was changed after January 1958.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Sunday, September 10, 2017 2:05 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Bulkhead Flats & Wallboard

 

 

 



---In STMFC@..., <thecitrusbelt@...> wrote :

 

 

Does anyone know when bulkhead flatcars (such as noted in the article rather than pulpwood cars) first emerged in quantity on U.S. railroads? It appears that this would be sometime after 1950, when 200 such cars were in service.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

====================

 

My late father worked in Chicago area lumber yards while he was in high school during the late thirties, and again after he was discharged from the Army in 1946, until 1952 when he went to work as a construction carpenter. We discussed wallboard shipping once some years ago. He said he unloaded a lot of wallboard from boxcars; never saw a bulkhead flat. Most of the wallboard service bulkhead cars I've seen photos of have built dates in the mid fifties.

 

Dennis Storzek


Re: Bulkhead Flats & Wallboard

Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <thecitrusbelt@...> wrote :

 

Does anyone know when bulkhead flatcars (such as noted in the article rather than pulpwood cars) first emerged in quantity on U.S. railroads? It appears that this would be sometime after 1950, when 200 such cars were in service.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

====================


My late father worked in Chicago area lumber yards while he was in high school during the late thirties, and again after he was discharged from the Army in 1946, until 1952 when he went to work as a construction carpenter. We discussed wallboard shipping once some years ago. He said he unloaded a lot of wallboard from boxcars; never saw a bulkhead flat. Most of the wallboard service bulkhead cars I've seen photos of have built dates in the mid fifties.


Dennis Storzek


Re: PRR X23, X25 and B&O M-26 photo

Tony Thompson
 

It would only take a few miles near a steam engine being badly fired to do that. I don't think it typical.
Tony Thompson 


On Sep 9, 2017, at 10:04 PM, 'Aley, Jeff A' Jeff.A.Aley@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Dave,

 

               In one of Tony Thompson’s recent blog postings, I was struck by the appearance of a flat car load of lumber.  There was a significant coating of soot on the top of the load.

               If I assume that this car was a “roller” and roamed the rails for a three or four weeks, that would indicate that any car over a month old should have a pretty grimy roof.

 

The photo may be seen here:

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-oXGAZ80oqjg/VW46BFgipSI/AAAAAAAAJHQ/8040YOtxqPI/s1600/Celanese%2Bcolor.jpg

 

Regards,

 

-Jeff

 

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Saturday, September 09, 2017 7:02 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: PRR X23, X25 and B&O M-26 photo

 

 

Bruce,

I agree, and perhaps a obvious observation to this group - but when you look at some of Delano's Proviso yard photos there are at least some freshly painted cars, or at least they appear to be recently painted (or perhaps washed by a heavy rain?) I have been wondering just how many (or few) cars to leave un-weathered, or lightly weathered for a WWII layout. Delano's photos had convinced me that at least 5, and maybe 10 percent should have minimal weathering.

But in this collection - I am not sure I have spotted a single clean car, and a bunch where the reporting marks are pretty hard to make out - even when they are big enough to be legible. I have wondered how much of the "Weathering" was actually just soot from the last few days run, easily washed off in a strong rain... Soft coal ash is often sticky (constituents not fully burned), so the airflow may not knock it off the sides.

I think in some of Delano's Proviso yard pictures there was evidence of snow on the roofs of some cars (recent arrivals from? - likely moving through a damp or wet environment) and I do not recall so many reporting marks being so hard to read - so I am wondering if recent, but temporary, soot accumulation was a significant component of WWII "weathering."

Dave Evans

41081 - 41100 of 193642