Date   

Building the new Owl Mountain flat car

Tony Thompson
 

I have posted to my blog a description of building this very fine new kit from Owl Mountain, for an SP "Harriman" flat car. I really like how well the parts go together, and the final product is, to my eye, very handsome. If you're interested in the build, here is a link:

http://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/2017/09/building-owl-mountain-flat-car.html

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Modeling Monon #37 PS1 Underframe

Bill Welch
 

One of the highlights of Ed Hawkins' very fine presentation about the 40-foot Pullman PS1 at the 2017 Collinsville RPM was learning that despite their Rectangular panel roofs and improved Dreadnaught ends, the Monon's 1-500 series were actually PS1's. This interested me because I have building a model of Monon #37. Since C'ville a photo surfaced of the underframe and I decided to build a new underframe for my model. After getting a spare InterMountain PS1 underframe from a friend I decided to use a piece Evergreen styrene for the floor. The CB&T body was too narrow for the underframe part so the first step was to cut the bolsters, cross ties and cross bears from the center sill. I then cut the Evergreen to fit the C&BT body. This required more than the typical fitting as the body had several reinforcements to strength the brittle plastic of the body. Once the centersill was glued to the Evergreen floor, I trimmed the bolsters and cross bearers to fit the new structure. Before gluing the bolsters in place I created the elongated holes in the bolsters to match the prototype photo. I also used the cross bearers that came with the IM u/f. The IM cross ties did not match in the prototype photo so I used Evergreen channel. Mine are not the exact shape in the photo but capture the feel—good enough for me. From this point it was just a matter of placing the three main components in place, then the piping, levers and rods. The cylinder, reservoir, and AB valve are from a recently purchased IM 70-ton flat car that I was not going to use because it cannot be seen. The dirt collector is Tichy, as are clevices made from their turnbuckles. The fact that the brake cylinder had a big dimple did not bother me since it will be in shadow. The jewel of the underframe is the brass slack adjuster made for me by a very good friend especially for this u/f. A few drops of epoxy from its attachment can be seen on the floor. I filled in the truck holes with "Two-Ton" epoxy since there was not a boss to screw into. My plan is to simply drill into the epoxy and run the screws in.

For those interested here is the link to five photos of the new u/f in primer: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/a6estz54pg64hmy/AABbQDFlnYVENME2uTSP01Bqa?dl=0

Bill Welch
 


SOLD:Out of the box thinking--a rewarding trait in our hobby

Andy Carlson
 

It has a new home. Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA



----- Forwarded Message -----
From: Andy Carlson
To: STMFC YahooGroup
Sent: Thursday, September 14, 2017 11:00 AM
Subject: Out of the box thinking--a rewarding trait in our hobby

I have a great deal of respect to the clever folks who make our hobby much more interesting. Numerous examples abound, and I have met several of them.  I would place our own Tom Madden, Byron Rose, Robert Zenk, Wayne Madison and Terry Wegmann as a few of the many.

A little story which dovetails with this. Years ago, the noted NP HO modeler, Jack Parker, proprietor of CENTRAL VALLEY MODEL WORKS, had a good friend and frequent visitor, David Coster. Both gentlemen were ardent Northern Pacific modelers, and David had one of those "out of the box' moments. Wanting several NP wood sided ice bunker reefers, the choices were sunshine resin, and W&R brass. David felt that the Red Caboose factory painted NP wood cabooses, though foobies due to the roof and underframe differences, were actually very close to the prototype. David made a kit bashed NP reefer using the RC decorated kit, plus he used a narrowed longitudinally CV NP stock car radial roof. For the underframe, Dave used an Accurail fish belly from their 40' SS box car series. The ends were OK after the gaps along the top were covered by a thin fascia trim strip.

Jack told his other good friend, Terry Wegman, about this simple kit bash. Terry shared this with his TUES evening modelers group. Member Jerry Glow (Who later became better known with his decal line) made one of these conversions which he made into a construction article, which was published (Maybe in the NP Mainstreeter publication?).

Terry, being an individual intrigued by anything shiny or cool, came back with a CV roof which he milled the one scale foot out of the length of the roof while still on the sprue. Someone cut the fascia strip with a cricket type of cutter onto a peel-n-stick sheet.

Comparing the finished HO models with prototype pictures shows the height of the area between the door top and the roof eaves to be a little short, about 2-3 scale inches. Otherwise, things look good.

Terry did a few roofs for his friends, and never publicized the parts he did beyond the group. I am fortunate to have acquired one of these "Wegmannized" NP reefer kits. It has the machined CV roof, and the die-cut end fascia board pairs. This kit does not have the Accurail fishbelly underframe. The RC car is NP 90513, with a stencil date of 2-42. RC kit #RC-4435-09.

If any one reading this post would like to purchase this kit for $29, 1st class shipping included, contact me off-list.
Thanks,
-Andy Carlson, Ojai CA



Out of the box thinking--a rewarding trait in our hobby

Andy Carlson
 

I have a great deal of respect to the clever folks who make our hobby much more interesting. Numerous examples abound, and I have met several of them.  I would place our own Tom Madden, Byron Rose, Robert Zenk, Wayne Madison and Terry Wegmann as a few of the many.

A little story which dovetails with this. Years ago, the noted NP HO modeler, Jack Parker, proprietor of CENTRAL VALLEY MODEL WORKS, had a good friend and frequent visitor, David Coster. Both gentlemen were ardent Northern Pacific modelers, and David had one of those "out of the box' moments. Wanting several NP wood sided ice bunker reefers, the choices were sunshine resin, and W&R brass. David felt that the Red Caboose factory painted NP wood cabooses, though foobies due to the roof and underframe differences, were actually very close to the prototype. David made a kit bashed NP reefer using the RC decorated kit, plus he used a narrowed longitudinally CV NP stock car radial roof. For the underframe, Dave used an Accurail fish belly from their 40' SS box car series. The ends were OK after the gaps along the top were covered by a thin fascia trim strip.

Jack told his other good friend, Terry Wegman, about this simple kit bash. Terry shared this with his TUES evening modelers group. Member Jerry Glow (Who later became better known with his decal line) made one of these conversions which he made into a construction article, which was published (Maybe in the NP Mainstreeter publication?).

Terry, being an individual intrigued by anything shiny or cool, came back with a CV roof which he milled the one scale foot out of the length of the roof while still on the sprue. Someone cut the fascia strip with a cricket type of cutter onto a peel-n-stick sheet.

Comparing the finished HO models with prototype pictures shows the height of the area between the door top and the roof eaves to be a little short, about 2-3 scale inches. Otherwise, things look good.

Terry did a few roofs for his friends, and never publicized the parts he did beyond the group. I am fortunate to have acquired one of these "Wegmannized" NP reefer kits. It has the machined CV roof, and the die-cut end fascia board pairs. This kit does not have the Accurail fishbelly underframe. The RC car is NP 90513, with a stencil date of 2-42. RC kit #RC-4435-09.

If any one reading this post would like to purchase this kit for $29, 1st class shipping included, contact me off-list.
Thanks,
-Andy Carlson, Ojai CA


Hurricane and Mike Brock

Aley, Jeff A
 

Mike Brock, our esteemed listowner, was planning to evacuate early to a hotel in Orlando.  He did not expect significant damage at his home, but said that being without power (Air Conditioning!) for long periods of time is no fun.  I have not heard from him lately; I don’t expect to hear from him until after power & clean-water service is restored in his area.

 

One hopes that he took a tool box and some steam-era freight car kits to work on during his exile.

 

Regards,

 

-Jeff Aley

Deputy Moderator, STMFC

 

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, September 14, 2017 9:55 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Pivoted Machinery

 

 

Dennis wrote :
>

> I know it's nice to have the last word, but this is ridiculous.

> I thought my message killed the forum :-)

 

The group has been awfully quiet since our Florida members got taken off line by the hurricane. Bill Welch in Clearwater has resurfaced, but the east coast contingent hasn't. Any word from or about Mike Brock? A Merritt Island resident posted to another list yesterday that they were still without power, water, land line phones and internet. The Cocoa Beach Hilton's web site says they're closed until further notice due to a mandatory evacuation order. Nasty.....

 

Tom Madden


Re: Pivoted Machinery

Tom Madden
 

Dennis wrote :
>
> I know it's nice to have the last word, but this is ridiculous.
> I thought my message killed the forum :-)

The group has been awfully quiet since our Florida members got taken off line by the hurricane. Bill Welch in Clearwater has resurfaced, but the east coast contingent hasn't. Any word from or about Mike Brock? A Merritt Island resident posted to another list yesterday that they were still without power, water, land line phones and internet. The Cocoa Beach Hilton's web site says they're closed until further notice due to a mandatory evacuation order. Nasty.....

Tom Madden


Re: Pivoted Machinery

destorzek@...
 

I know it's nice to have the last word, but this is ridiculous. I thought my message killed the forum :-)

Dennis Storzek


Re: Pivoted Machinery

John Barry
 

Clear and Legible!
 
John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 
Lovettsville, VA

707-490-9696 

PO Box 44736 
Washington, DC 20026-4736



From: "destorzek@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, September 14, 2017 10:05 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Pivoted Machinery

 
Test
?



Re: Pivoted Machinery

destorzek@...
 

Test
?


Re: Pivoted Machinery

destorzek@...
 

Precisely. When loading things like power shovels (steam or otherwise) not only does the machine need to be secured to the car, but also the cab and boom secured to the car so it can't swing outside the clearance diagram.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Pivoted Machinery

mark_landgraf
 

A pivoted machinery is usually considered to a rail mounted crane, or a pile driver, etc. The operating rules almost always call for the booms to be secured in the trailing position, so as to avoid creating a catapult situation while going down the track. 

Theoretically this could also apply to ‎equipment loaded on rr cars.  Think stuff like tracked excavators, either revenue or M of W. 

Mark Landgraf
Albany NY

From: thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]
Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 9:18 PM
To: STMFC@...
Reply To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Pivoted Machinery

 

Pivoted Machinery

 

This looks like a placard:

 

http://prr.railfan.net/images/PivotedMachineryLadingCard_CT310.gif

 

But what best describes "pivoted machinery"?

 

Thanks.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


.


Re: Pivoted Machinery

Michael Mang
 

"Derricks, steam shovels, and other pivoted machinery..." from the "Report of the Proceedings of the Executive Committee of the Master Car Builders Association, June 14, 1917". 

How do you keep those moving things from not moving during shipping, I suppose.

Michael Mang

On Tue, Sep 12, 2017 at 9:18 PM thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Pivoted Machinery

 

This looks like a placard:

 

http://prr.railfan.net/images/PivotedMachineryLadingCard_CT310.gif

 

But what best describes "pivoted machinery"?

 

Thanks.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Pivoted Machinery

thecitrusbelt@...
 

Pivoted Machinery

 

This looks like a placard:

 

http://prr.railfan.net/images/PivotedMachineryLadingCard_CT310.gif

 

But what best describes "pivoted machinery"?

 

Thanks.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Placard Boards, Route Card Boards & ?

Tony Thompson
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:

 

Time began for me on October 31, 1953. For all I know everything prior to that date is #fakenews.

:-) >:-}


      This list must be a great trial for you .

Tony Thompson




Re: Placard Boards, Route Card Boards & ?

Tim O'Connor
 

Tony

Time began for me on October 31, 1953. For all I know everything prior to that date is #fakenews.

:-) >:-}


Huh. Wadda ya know? Sounds like I wasn't so confused after all. :-)

Yep, as long as you stick to 1954 and later. Innumerable prototype photos in the late 1940s will amply illustrate your confusion for those years

Tony Thompson


Re: NYC Boxcars: The Star Stencil

destorzek@...
 

Yeah, poor choice of words. What I really meant was there was some reason, other than axle/bearing capacity, why the owner wanted a lower load limit. The star just told everybody not to change it.

Dennis Storzek


Re: NYC Boxcars: The Star Stencil

D. Scott Chatfield
 

Soo Line Storzek wrote:

> The star usually means there is some other structural deficiency other than the bearing size that dictates the max. allowable load. 

I would like to take a friendly exception to the choice of words "structural deficiency" when talking about the use of star next to the CAPY.  "Limitations" is a better word.  In the case of pig flats with hitches, use of which began right of the end of this list's era, the limitation is the capacity of the cushioned hitches, which was and still is 65,000 pounds each, for a limit of 130,000 pounds.  There was no structural deficiency in the pig flat itself.

Scott Chatfield


Re: Placard Boards, Route Card Boards & ?

Tony Thompson
 

Huh. Wadda ya know? Sounds like I wasn't so confused after all. :-)


     Yep, as long as you stick to 1954 and later. Innumerable prototype photos in the late 1940s will amply illustrate your confusion for those years.


Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: Placard Boards, Route Card Boards & ?

Tim O'Connor
 


Huh. Wadda ya know? Sounds like I wasn't so confused after all. :-)

Tim O'Connor




Tim wrote:

"If someone has a copy of the AAR Recommended Practice Manual, C-42,
then we can get the official word on the subject. :-)"

From the 1954 AAR Manual of Standard and Recommended Practice.  This revision includes the modifications made
with regard to the position of placards (circa 1954).

Further information is contained within Interchange Rules 36 and 49 as to the requirements (from owners) for cars offered
in interchange.  I will try to post that information within the next couple of days.      

HOUSE CAR, PLACARD AND ROUTING CARD BOARDS FOR

Recommended Practice

Adopted, 1914; Revised, 1948, 1952, 1953

The space available for placards should not be less than 16 by 24 in. on each end and each side of car.  Steel house cars should be provided
with placard boards made of soft wood not less than 16 by 24 in. and not less than 23/32 in. thick.  The vertical edges should be reinforced with
metal protection pieces fastened to the board with not less than six bolts, three through each, and at least four of these bolts should be used to
fasten the placard board to the door, car end, or placard board brackets when used.  The boards may be made of more than one piece, and
should then be tongued and grooved, ship lap or notched edge.  The distance from the floor line of car to bottom of board should not exceed 2 ft. 6 in.
for end board and 22 in. for side boards.  These will be located on each end and on one door on each side.

On steel house cars routing boards with space of not less than 5 1/2 by 9 in. available for tacking cards will be placed on one door on each side
to left of placard board with lower edge in line with lower edge of placard board and so as to not interfere with lifting handle of door.  On steel
refrigerator cars, routing card boards shall be located on each side directly under placard boards.

On other than house cars, card board must be located on each side of car near bottom at left hand end, facing side of car, or on outer end of end sill.
On cars equipped with center sills only, cardboards must be located near center of car attached to outer end of running board support, or attached to
outer end of body bolster.  

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada


Re: Placard Boards, Route Card Boards & ?

Tony Thompson
 

Guy Wilber wrote:

 
From the 1954 AAR Manual of Standard and Recommended Practice.  This revision includes the modifications made with regard to the position of placards (circa 1954).

      Thanks, Guy. The original queries about placard boards concerned the two "placard" boards on reefers after 1946, along with a route card board at the bolster end. The 1954 version unfortunately post-dates these arrangements, as is evident, for example, on PFE cars built in or after 1954. Might you have any earlier AAR Manual copies?

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





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