Date   

Re: Weight Of A Freight Car Wheel?

Rhbale@...
 

It is my understanding that modern 33-inch freight car wheels weigh 900 to 1,000 each. An axle is in the same neighborhood so a wheelset of two wheels and one axle would be in the range of 2,700 to 3,000 lbs. 
RHB
 
 

In a message dated 10/2/2017 10:23:43 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, STMFC@... writes:
 

How much would a 33-inch freight car wheel weigh, both new and worn, on average? I appreciate allowances need to be made for wheel style, manufacturer and era, but let's say an "average" wheel in the steam-diesel transition era.

 

I recall seeing a figure of 800 pounds in the distant past, but I have no idea if that is accurate.

 

The reason I ask is to settle a debate about how many wheels could be carried in a freight car with a fifty ton capacity.

 

Thanks.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Weight Of A Freight Car Wheel?

Tony Thompson
 

How much would a 33-inch freight car wheel weigh, both new and worn, on average? I appreciate allowances need to be made for wheel style, manufacturer and era, but let's say an "average" wheel in the steam-diesel transition er

I recall seeing a figure of 800 pounds in the distant past, but I have no idea if that is accurate.

       A couple of published documents refer to weights between 800 and 900 pounds.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Weight Of A Freight Car Wheel?

thecitrusbelt@...
 

How much would a 33-inch freight car wheel weigh, both new and worn, on average? I appreciate allowances need to be made for wheel style, manufacturer and era, but let's say an "average" wheel in the steam-diesel transition era.

 

I recall seeing a figure of 800 pounds in the distant past, but I have no idea if that is accurate.

 

The reason I ask is to settle a debate about how many wheels could be carried in a freight car with a fifty ton capacity.

 

Thanks.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Side reporting marks

Jack Mullen
 

Tony said
 First, anyone with a little typography knowledge will see that few (I know of none) railroads actually adopted it. Second, it is most certainly NOT what Champ and others termed "Railroad Roman."

Presumably the railroads, as well as Champ, found they needed more than three letters. ;>)



Jack Mullen


Interesting Flat Car Load

Matt Goodman
 

A steam era freight car list member sent me an email off list that the “interesting load” photo didn’t show up on my post from last week.

I inserted the photo inline in my original email, so perhaps it was stripped. For the curious among you, I’ve attached it in a more conventional manner this time, which YahooGroups should (based on the behavior I’ve seen for the group policies) post to the group’s site.

Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio US. 





Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio

Sent from my mobile

On Oct 1, 2017, at 2:07 AM, Jim Pickett <jimpick2001@...> wrote:

I didn't see any picture of a flat car load or of any address showing how to find one. I'm assuming you sent one. of course you know what assume means - it makes an ass out of u and me.


Re: Side reporting marks

Tony Thompson
 

The suggested MCB letters must be regarded in two lights. First, anyone with a little typography knowledge will see that few (I know of none) railroads actually adopted it. Second, it is most certainly NOT what Champ and others termed "Railroad Roman."
Tony Thompson 


On Oct 2, 2017, at 6:43 PM, curtfortenberry@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 


Guy,

Thanks for that.  A google search found a MCB standard drawings book scanned here:


It contains the plate you mention, but only a few letters and numbers, not a complete alphabet.

Curt Fortenberry

---In STMFC@..., wrote :

On Sep 27, Curt Fortenberry wrote:

"Also, I thought I read that about this time, MCB issued the granddaddy version of the stencil lettering typeface? I've never seen it, could be urban legend."

The Master Car Builders Association issued MCB 26B; "Standard Letters And Figures For Freight Car Markings" in 1911. The original was revised in 1913, '16 and '17. The plate included examples of 9", 7", 4", 3", 2" and 1" letters as well as numerals.

The intent (at the time) was to standardize figures in order to lessen expenses for cutting stencils to match existing markings used on interchanged cars for painting, repairs and service (brake and journal repacks) conditions.

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada
 


Re: NP LETTERING ??

frograbbit602
 

As Brian and Tim could not find photos of a NP car with the letters "A" and "B" next to the side of the door I asked about, I sent sent them each a photo of a 1937 box car with the letter "A" next to the door in the series I asked about. (photo proof).
Lester Breuer
.


Re: Side reporting marks

Guy Wilber
 

Curt wrote:

"It contains the plate you mention, but only a few letters and numbers, not a complete alphabet."

There never was a complete alphabet or set of numerals. Only The examples you cite. But, it was definitely not a myth!

Regards,

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada


Re: Side reporting marks

Curt Fortenberry
 


Guy,

Thanks for that.  A google search found a MCB standard drawings book scanned here:


It contains the plate you mention, but only a few letters and numbers, not a complete alphabet.

Curt Fortenberry

---In STMFC@..., <guycwilber@...> wrote :

On Sep 27, Curt Fortenberry wrote:

"Also, I thought I read that about this time, MCB issued the granddaddy version of the stencil lettering typeface? I've never seen it, could be urban legend."

The Master Car Builders Association issued MCB 26B; "Standard Letters And Figures For Freight Car Markings" in 1911. The original was revised in 1913, '16 and '17. The plate included examples of 9", 7", 4", 3", 2" and 1" letters as well as numerals.

The intent (at the time) was to standardize figures in order to lessen expenses for cutting stencils to match existing markings used on interchanged cars for painting, repairs and service (brake and journal repacks) conditions.

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada
 


Re: NP LETTERING ??

 

I can send you at least one of each. 

Thanks!
Brian Ehni 
(Sent from my iPhone)

On Oct 2, 2017, at 7:25 PM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 


I can find no examples from 380 NP box car photos of an A or B on the side of the
car. On the ENDS of the cars I see consistently both A and B symbols (letter inside
a circle) on box cars from the 1920's through the 1960's, and many examples of L and
R on wood side cars, as well as on steel cars. The style of the A and B stencils are
the same in all cases.

Tim O'Connor



Correction. Just found some with "A" next to door, but these all seem to be older cars
with Andrews trucks. Brian Ehni




 As I was reviewing photos of Northern Pacific box cars in the 15000 to 17899 series of 1937 built box cars I find an "A" or "B" rather than the more common "L" or " R" next to the door on the left side when facing the side of the car.  I am wondering if other railroads used the "A" or "B" next to the door?   And, am I correct when I guess these letters mean the "A" or "B" end of the car?
 Lester Breuer


Box Car Crack Filler For Grain Transport

Michael Gross
 

Thought members would enjoy this interesting excerpt from the Fort Madison, Iowa Evening Democrat - December 18, 1919

USE OF PATENT CRACK FILLER FOR CARS SUCCESSFUL

The test of the Baco combination which was recently introduced on the railroads for use in freight cars to stop small grain leakage has been carried on for some time by the Santa Fe and is said by the local employees of the company to be a success in every way. In composition it contains a very large percentage of tar mixed with a small percentage of other and unknown ingredients

The method of procedure in the case of mending car floors and sides is to place a considerable quantity of “Baco” over a fire to reduce it from a lumpy stiff mass to a simmering ebony liquid in which state it is poured along the seams and tiny openings in the car floor to make the car grain proof.  The loss in grain leakage in freight cars is said to be considerable, several bushels dropping out of a loaded car while in transportation."

Michael Gross

Pasadena, CA



Re: NP LETTERING ??

Tim O'Connor
 


I can find no examples from 380 NP box car photos of an A or B on the side of the
car. On the ENDS of the cars I see consistently both A and B symbols (letter inside
a circle) on box cars from the 1920's through the 1960's, and many examples of L and
R on wood side cars, as well as on steel cars. The style of the A and B stencils are
the same in all cases.

Tim O'Connor



Correction. Just found some with "A" next to door, but these all seem to be older cars
with Andrews trucks. Brian Ehni




 As I was reviewing photos of Northern Pacific box cars in the 15000 to 17899 series of 1937 built box cars I find an "A" or "B" rather than the more common "L" or " R" next to the door on the left side when facing the side of the car.  I am wondering if other railroads used the "A" or "B" next to the door?   And, am I correct when I guess these letters mean the "A" or "B" end of the car?
 Lester Breuer


Re: Superior doors

Fred Jansz
 

Thanks Steve
Fred


Re: Superior doors

Steve Haas
 

Fred,

 

The SSW 10’ 0” seven panel door _does_ exist (I’ve got 7 pair I’ve acquired through Andy over time), but it is not on the web site.

 

Perhaps contacting SSW directly through the web site might yield some success.

 

Best regards,

 

Steve

 

Steve Haas

Snoqualmie, WA

 


Re: NP LETTERING ??

 

Correction. Just found some with “A” next to door, but these all seem to be older cars with Andrews trucks….





Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni



From: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com> on behalf of STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Reply-To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Monday, October 2, 2017 at 12:40 PM
To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] NP LETTERING ??





As I was reviewing photos of Northern Pacific box cars in the 15000 to 17899 series of 1937 built box cars I find an "A" or "B" rather than the more common "L" or " R" next to the door on the left side when facing the side of the car. I am wondering if other railroads used the "A" or "B" next to the door? And, am I correct when I guess these letters mean the "A" or "B" end of the car?

Lester Breuer


Re: NP LETTERING ??

 

Just spot checked a few of my NP box car photos, and all of the ones I looked at had either “L” or “R” next to the door. End views all had a “B” or “A”, depending on which end it was.





Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni



From: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com> on behalf of STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Reply-To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Monday, October 2, 2017 at 12:40 PM
To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] NP LETTERING ??





As I was reviewing photos of Northern Pacific box cars in the 15000 to 17899 series of 1937 built box cars I find an "A" or "B" rather than the more common "L" or " R" next to the door on the left side when facing the side of the car. I am wondering if other railroads used the "A" or "B" next to the door? And, am I correct when I guess these letters mean the "A" or "B" end of the car?

Lester Breuer









[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


NP LETTERING ??

frograbbit602
 

As I was reviewing photos of Northern Pacific box cars in the 15000 to 17899 series of 1937 built box cars I find an "A" or "B" rather than the more common "L" or " R" next to the door on the left side when facing the side of the car.  I am wondering if other railroads used the "A" or "B" next to the door?   And, am I correct when I guess these letters mean the "A" or "B" end of the car?

Lester Breuer




Re: Improving Atlas 1932 kits to model Erie & I-GN boxcars

Bill Welch
 


Re: Superior doors

Fred Jansz
 

Andy,
Northern Pacific 17000-17899, blt 5/1941, has cars with Superior doors.
NP 17672 - illustrated in the Yarmouth kit #107 manual- with 10'0" IH is a fine example.
Kit has Youngstown door, I prefer the rarer Superior one.
Could you please supply a link to the SSW 10' IH Superior door?
I can only find 10'6" Superior doors on the site.
best regards,
Fred Jansz


Re: Side reporting marks

Guy Wilber
 

Charlie Vlk wrote;

"Does the term “reporting marks” encompass all the dimensional, weight. load and other information stenciled on the car or just refer to the owner initials?"

Owners initials and car number only.

"When was the registry of owner initials established and under what authority was it established?"

Private cars in 1910 followed by Railroad owned cars. The subject involved The ARA, The MCBA and the Association Of Transportation And Car Accounting Officers. There are further discussions on this subject in the archives...April of 2013.

"Did the Official Railway Equipment Registry have any official or quasi-official role in the assignment of initials to prevent confusion?"

Absolutely not.

"I’ve been skimming old railroad journals and don’t recall the subject coming up in the minutes of the Master Car Builders association or in articles."

Again, search Reporting Marks in the archives along with my name and you'll find most of your questions answered.

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada

30661 - 30680 of 183656