Date   

Re: And the weight of the cast truck is? Bolster? (was Weight Of A Freight Car Wheel?)

John Barry
 

Although the Terminated Truck may have been manufactured during our time frame.  Note the journal covers on the truck, normally on plain bearing devices for supporting STMFCs on rails.
 
John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 
Lovettsville, VA

707-490-9696 

PO Box 44736 
Washington, DC 20026-4736



From: "Benjamin Hom b.hom@... [STMFC]" To: "STMFC@..."
Sent: Thursday, October 5, 2017 5:08 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] And the weight of the cast truck is? Bolster? (was Weight Of A Freight Car Wheel?)

 
James Matthews wrote:
"Are you sure about those weights? Not quite apples to apples but a built up three piece 70-ton roller bearing truck with truck mounted cylinders and 34" wheels weighs 8,500-9,000 pounds (I have the exact weight somewhere). 50-ton trucks are 750-1,000 pounds less while 100-ton trucks on 1,000-1,500 pounds more."

Heavy enough to squash a Terminator, though this takes place well after the era of this list. ;)


Ben Hom




Re: And the weight of the cast truck is? Bolster? (was Weight Of A Freight Car Wheel?)

Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <b.hom@...> wrote :

Heavy enough to squash a Terminator, though this takes place well after the era of this list. ;)


Ben Hom
==================

Yeah, but the Terminator is chintzy post 2000 construction.

When I looked at Tony's numbers, I decided they work... for a PAIR of trucks with wheel sets.

Dennis Storzek


Re: And the weight of the cast truck is? Bolster? (was Weight Of A Freight Car Wheel?)

Benjamin Hom
 

James Matthews wrote:
"Are you sure about those weights? Not quite apples to apples but a built up three piece 70-ton roller bearing truck with truck mounted cylinders and 34" wheels weighs 8,500-9,000 pounds (I have the exact weight somewhere). 50-ton trucks are 750-1,000 pounds less while 100-ton trucks on 1,000-1,500 pounds more."

Heavy enough to squash a Terminator, though this takes place well after the era of this list. ;)


Ben Hom


Re: And the weight of the cast truck is? Bolster? (was Weight Of A Freight Car Wheel?)

jace6315
 

Tony,

Are you sure about those weights? Not quite apples to apples but a built up three piece 70-ton roller bearing truck with truck mounted cylinders and 34" wheels weighs 8,500-9,000 pounds (I have the exact weight somewhere). 50-ton trucks are 750-1,000 pounds less while 100-ton trucks on 1,000-1,500 pounds more.

Jim Matthews


--------------------------------------------

On Thu, 10/5/17, Tony Thompson tony@signaturepress.com [STMFC] <STMFC@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Subject: Re: [STMFC] And the weight of the cast truck is? Bolster? (was Weight Of A Freight Car Wheel?)
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Thursday, October 5, 2017, 2:39 AM

  Dave, you might enjoy my article in
_Model Railroad Hobbyist_ in the issue for September 2016
(download or read on line, for free, any time, at their
website, www.mrhmag.com ). You will
find all this discussed there. Bolsters weighed 1000 pounds
or more, as did side frames, and then add the spring planks
(if any), spring packages, and brake linkage. Most freight
trucks in the transition era weighed between 12,000 and
14,000 pounds.

Tony Thompson          
  Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA
94705         www.signaturepress.com(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@signaturepress.comPublishers of books on railroad
history
















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Re: Box Car Crack Filler For Grain Transport

np328
 

   I had mentioned the following before, perhaps not on this list.
Seafood shipping is where refrigerators went to die, not unlike hide cars in the same manner.

    I have a copy of a letter (somewhere in the pile of research data spread about the house) that an officer of the (my studied) railroad stated "refrigerator cars, once used for the shipment of fish, are unsuitable for any other commodity". Not unlike the fish impregnated Styrofoam coolers that people state innocently "Oh, I've got a cooler you can have, for free". 
   How did my railroad keep this usage in check? A number series sufficient to handle said fish trade was transferred out of general (reefer) usage and into the fish/seafood trade.

..........

I need to find my file on a product with brochure not unlike what Michael posted that was sprayed in boxcars/other railroad car interiors to bring this string back on track (no pun intended) as it seems to be veering a bit off the subject line.  Not that I as a person of German heritage, I dislike the discussion of beer.                                                                                                                                        Jim Dick                                      


Chicago RPM operating session

Ted Schnepf
 

Hi Everyone,

Attendees to the Chicago RPM can participate in an operating session on Sunday morning, on a O scale 2 rail layout, no experience is necessary.

As at past meets, an operating session will be on Sunday morning, 10/29, from 9 AM to 1 PM and is open to anyone. Just contact me off list or at the meet to reserve a spot.

See you in Chicago area in a couple weeks.

Ted

Rails Unlimited
Ted Schnepf
railsunl@sbcglobal.net
847-697-5353
126 Will Scarlet
Elgin, Ill. 60120
http://RailsUnlimited.ribbonrail.com/

Model Railroad Sales and Service with
a personal touch.
Books new and used. HO and O scales.
DCC supplies. O scale urethane cars.
Photos and darkroom services.
Checks, cash (0%) or credit (secure server at web site 5% added).


Re: Box Car Crack Filler For Grain Transport

Jeff Shultz <jeff@...>
 

So is part of Oregon, such as the deep water port of Coos Bay, the railroad line to which was part of the Southern Pacific system in the Steam Era. I imagine most of the freight cars on it then were flat cars or boxcars with lumber doors in their ends. Perhaps some refrigerator cars for seafood shipping. 

On Oct 4, 2017 21:15, "Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:
 


Alaska and parts of Washington are further west than the furthest west extent
of California. What any of this has to do with freight cars, only the Sheriff can say.
I think beer may have travelled in steam era freight cars to Alaska.

Tim O'


When you say "west of California", do you mean Hawaii, Guam, PI, Japan or maybe China? Or further west?

Take Care,
 
Brian R. Termunde
Midvale, Utah

2a. Re: Box Car Crack Filler For Grain Transport
Posted by: "Dave Parker" spottab@... spottab
Date: Wed Oct 4, 2017 7:56 am ((PDT))

Tony wrote:There is a big company that uses rice to make a thin beverage, but many of us do not consider it beer.
Well said, but there are many companies that use what are called adjuncts in the brewing of "beer".  An adjunct is any source of fermentables that is not malted barley (or wheat or rye).  Rice is particularly prevalent in beers brewed to the west of California, but my sense is that corn is just as (perhaps more) common in U.S. lagers from the large macrobreweries.
The Germans have traditionally been rather stuffy about the use of adjuncts, with various iterations of their Reinheitsgebot (purity regulations) dating back to the 16th century.  Traditionally, to be called beer in Germany, the only ingredients allowed are malt, hops, water, and yeast.
Actually, many very good beers contain adjuncts, often some form of table sugar (sucrose).  FBOFW, these additions increase the alcohol content without making the bee



Re: Box Car Crack Filler For Grain Transport

Nelson Moyer
 

Actually, it went by boat in the 1950s and earlier, but I was too young to imbibe when I lived in Alaska.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, October 04, 2017 11:16 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Box Car Crack Filler For Grain Transport

 

 


Alaska and parts of Washington are further west than the furthest west extent
of California. What any of this has to do with freight cars, only the Sheriff can say.
I think beer may have travelled in steam era freight cars to Alaska.

Tim O'


Re: And the weight of the cast truck is? Bolster? (was Weight Of A Freight Car Wheel?)

Tony Thompson
 

Dave Nelson] wrote:

 
Thank you all for the thoughts on the weight of a cast wheel. 

 What is the weight of a truck side frame?

 A truck bolster?


  Dave, you might enjoy my article in _Model Railroad Hobbyist_ in the issue for September 2016 (download or read on line, for free, any time, at their website, www.mrhmag.com ). You will find all this discussed there. Bolsters weighed 1000 pounds or more, as did side frames, and then add the spring planks (if any), spring packages, and brake linkage. Most freight trucks in the transition era weighed between 12,000 and 14,000 pounds.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






And the weight of the cast truck is? Bolster? (was Weight Of A Freight Car Wheel?)

Dave Nelson
 

Thank you all for the thoughts on the weight of a cast wheel. 

 

What is the weight of a truck side frame?

 

A truck bolster?

 

I ask because I’d like to estimate where the center of gravity lies in various empty cars.

 

Thanks in advance for any answers,

 

Dave Nelson


Re: Box Car Crack Filler For Grain Transport

Tim O'Connor
 


Alaska and parts of Washington are further west than the furthest west extent
of California. What any of this has to do with freight cars, only the Sheriff can say.
I think beer may have travelled in steam era freight cars to Alaska.

Tim O'


When you say "west of California", do you mean Hawaii, Guam, PI, Japan or maybe China? Or further west?

Take Care,
 
Brian R. Termunde
Midvale, Utah

2a. Re: Box Car Crack Filler For Grain Transport
Posted by: "Dave Parker" spottab@... spottab
Date: Wed Oct 4, 2017 7:56 am ((PDT))

Tony wrote:There is a big company that uses rice to make a thin beverage, but many of us do not consider it beer.
Well said, but there are many companies that use what are called adjuncts in the brewing of "beer".  An adjunct is any source of fermentables that is not malted barley (or wheat or rye).  Rice is particularly prevalent in beers brewed to the west of California, but my sense is that corn is just as (perhaps more) common in U.S. lagers from the large macrobreweries.
The Germans have traditionally been rather stuffy about the use of adjuncts, with various iterations of their Reinheitsgebot (purity regulations) dating back to the 16th century.  Traditionally, to be called beer in Germany, the only ingredients allowed are malt, hops, water, and yeast.
Actually, many very good beers contain adjuncts, often some form of table sugar (sucrose).  FBOFW, these additions increase the alcohol content without making the bee


Re: Low side gons

Tim O'Connor
 


from the ORER's, N&W 41 foot IL gondolas:

               1940    1950   1955    1959
 ---------------------------------------------------
 90000-90499   500     499       0       0 (3'0" IH)
 91000-91999** 1000    -         -       - (4'4" IH)
      -92599** -       1578    228       - (4'4" IH)
 93600-97599   2481    1233    205       0 (4'4" IH)
 98000-98631   0       622     112       0 (4'4" IH)

Tim O'Connor

  ** The series 91000-91999 expanded to 92599 by 1950
      and then 91000+ were replaced with 46 foot cars by 1959



Longer answer, discounting composite and side-dump cars and mill gondolas:

N&W cut down 800 class GJa gondolas to 3' sides in 1934-5, #s 98000-98799 class GJc.
N&W cut down 500 class GU gondolas to 3' sides in 1938, #s 90000-90499 class G-2.
Virginian cut down 75 class G-2 gondolas to 3'6" sides in 1941, #s 3850-3924 class G-2A.

N&W class G-6 and G-9 were longer than 40'.

David Thompson


Re: Box Car Crack Filler For Grain Transport

Dave Parker
 

Brian:

I was thinking specifically about the Land of the Rising Sun, and its ubiquitous and insipid Sapporo.  But there are many similar "rice lagers" from that part of the world, none of them measurably better (IMO).

BTW, I don't share your disdain for all Utah beer.  Uinta makes a couple of IPAs that I am rather fond of, although the double Detour is something of a head-kicker.

An of course, back in the day, beer was commonly transported in colorful refrigerator cars (obligatory stay-out-of-jail sentence).

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA



On Wednesday, October 4, 2017 6:40 PM, "Brian Termunde GCRDS@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Dave,
When you say "west of California", do you mean Hawaii, Guam, PI, Japan or maybe China? Or further west?

Take Care,
 
Brian R. Termunde
Midvale, Utah


-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC
To: STMFC
Sent: Wed, Oct 4, 2017 6:39 pm
Subject: [STMFC] Digest Number 11176



Messages
________________________________________________________________________


2a. Re: Box Car Crack Filler For Grain Transport
Posted by: "Dave Parker" spottab@... spottab
Date: Wed Oct 4, 2017 7:56 am ((PDT))

Tony wrote:There is a big company that uses rice to make a thin beverage, but many of us do not consider it beer.
Well said, but there are many companies that use what are called adjuncts in the brewing of "beer".  An adjunct is any source of fermentables that is not malted barley (or wheat or rye).  Rice is particularly prevalent in beers brewed to the west of California, but my sense is that corn is just as (perhaps more) common in U.S. lagers from the large macrobreweries.
The Germans have traditionally been rather stuffy about the use of adjuncts, with various iterations of their Reinheitsgebot (purity regulations) dating back to the 16th century.  Traditionally, to be called beer in Germany, the only ingredients allowed are malt, hops, water, and yeast.
Actually, many very good beers contain adjuncts, often some form of table sugar (sucrose).  FBOFW, these additions increase the alcohol content without making the beer too heavy.  Examples include many Belgian ales and even some "big" American IPAs.
And, as a rule, these adjuncts were and often still are transported in FREIGHT CARS.
Dave ParkerRiverside, CA(who used to brew beer before model railroading took over his entire life)



Re: CMTX 465 (Tank Car)

Tim O'Connor
 


I thought it was STC at first as well. But sure enough an STC 1915 frame is very
different than the 1918 frame, while the later PTC frames look more like the earlier
STC frame. Weird!

As for the date, can those spot/flood lights on the scale house help pin down the
decade at least?

Tim O'Connor


That's one of the very early (circa 1912-1916 or so) Pennsylvania Tank Car tanks. The frame design was taken up by Standard Tank Car when its predecessor started in 1916 and PTC changed frames.
David Thompson


http://i.pinimg.com/1200x/1d/e5/18/1de51863456974b82a4b9bf3146c35e7.jpg


Re: Low side gons

Tim O'Connor
 


Yes, but I don't know when they appeared on the roster. I have a photo of
N&W 247728, a 41 foot IL gondola, class G-14. It has a REBUILD stencil but
the date is obscured. Another class, G-55 had more typical interior height
and also is 41 foot IL. These may both be post-STMFC era.

Tim O'Connor




None I can find. The 1937 G1 class was the first lowside gons but they were 46'.
You could double check nwhs.org but I didn't see any.
Jeff Coleman



 Did the N&W or Virginian have 40 foot low side gondolas?�  I'm aware of 46 foot gons,
 but unsure on 40 foot. Thanks, George Courtney


Re: The circle continues to become smaller

Tony Thompson
 

       I can second what many have been saying -- it was always pleasant to run into Dave at a meeting. He invariably had well-informed questions to ask, and I always tried to answer as best I could. His store of knowledge of both prototype and model railroading was considerable, so he was an interesting person to chat with. I will miss him too.

Tony Thompson




Re: Box Car Crack Filler For Grain Transport

Brian Termunde
 

Dave,
When you say "west of California", do you mean Hawaii, Guam, PI, Japan or maybe China? Or further west?

Take Care,
 
Brian R. Termunde
Midvale, Utah


-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC
To: STMFC
Sent: Wed, Oct 4, 2017 6:39 pm
Subject: [STMFC] Digest Number 11176



Messages
________________________________________________________________________


2a. Re: Box Car Crack Filler For Grain Transport
Posted by: "Dave Parker" spottab@... spottab
Date: Wed Oct 4, 2017 7:56 am ((PDT))

Tony wrote:There is a big company that uses rice to make a thin beverage, but many of us do not consider it beer.
Well said, but there are many companies that use what are called adjuncts in the brewing of "beer".  An adjunct is any source of fermentables that is not malted barley (or wheat or rye).  Rice is particularly prevalent in beers brewed to the west of California, but my sense is that corn is just as (perhaps more) common in U.S. lagers from the large macrobreweries.
The Germans have traditionally been rather stuffy about the use of adjuncts, with various iterations of their Reinheitsgebot (purity regulations) dating back to the 16th century.  Traditionally, to be called beer in Germany, the only ingredients allowed are malt, hops, water, and yeast.
Actually, many very good beers contain adjuncts, often some form of table sugar (sucrose).  FBOFW, these additions increase the alcohol content without making the beer too heavy.  Examples include many Belgian ales and even some "big" American IPAs.
And, as a rule, these adjuncts were and often still are transported in FREIGHT CARS.
Dave ParkerRiverside, CA(who used to brew beer before model railroading took over his entire life)


Re: Howard Ameling

Jim King
 

Brian,

 

Thank you for correcting me re: where Howard’s collection went.  I’m glad it all stayed together with y’all rather than going to a dusty college archives who may never make them available.  He had a VERY large collection and it will take many volunteer hours to document all he amassed over at least 60 years of shooting and collecting.

 

Jim King

(828) 777-5619

www.smokymountainmodelworks.com

 


Re: Low side gons

David
 

Longer answer, discounting composite and side-dump cars and mill gondolas:

N&W cut down 800 class GJa gondolas to 3' sides in 1934-5, #s 98000-98799 class GJc.
N&W cut down 500 class GU gondolas to 3' sides in 1938, #s 90000-90499 class G-2.
Virginian cut down 75 class G-2 gondolas to 3'6" sides in 1941, #s 3850-3924 class G-2A.

N&W class G-6 and G-9 were longer than 40'.

David Thompson


Re: Low side gons

Jeff Coleman
 

None I can find. The 1937 G1 class was the first lowside gons but they were 46'. 
You could double check nwhs.org but I didn't see any. 

Jeff Coleman

On Oct 4, 2017 6:27 PM, "gsc3@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Did the N&W or Virginian have 40 foot low side gondolas?  I'm aware of 46 foot gons, but unsure on 40 foot.


Thanks,

George Courtney

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