Date   

Re: Gould/Tichy 40' flat

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Eric,



Just to expand on this listing. . .



DL&W 16350-16399 - 50 cars

Built 1926 with KC brake system

Mineral Red paint

USRA Andrews trucks



Were home-built by the DL&W at Keyser Valley Shops
in February 1926. Pretty much the DL&Ws entire
flat car fleet until piggyback came into
existence. Many were converted into piggyback
flats.



43 of these were still in service in April 1950.
I assume by then they'd been converted to AB
brakes.



Does the Tichy flat kit come with KC or AB brakes
(or both)?



Schuyler



From: STMFC@...
[mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Saturday, December 30, 2017 10:42 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Gould/Tichy 40' flat





I compiled prototype data for these models a
couple of years ago. The info is pasted below
along with an updated link to the Train Life site
for the RMJ magazine access.





Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN









Tichy Flat Car prototypes

Here are some prototype notes for the Tichy Flat
car model. This info was distilled form Richard
Hendrickson's article in the June 1993 Railmodel
Journal. The article begins on page 5.

<http://magazine.trainlife.com/rmj_1993_6/>
http://magazine.trainlife.com/rmj_1993_6/



NC&StL 70100-70199 - 100 cars

Built 1923 with KD brake system

Mineral Red paint

ARA cast steel side frame trucks



NC&StL 70200-70299 - 100 cars

Built 1926 with KC brake system

Mineral Red paint

Dalman Two-Level trucks



SP&S 32005-32054 - 50 cars

Built 1924 with KC brake system

Mineral Red paint

USRA Andrews trucks



DL&W 16350-16399 - 50 cars

Built 1926 with KC brake system

Mineral Red paint

USRA Andrews trucks



T&P 5000-5299 - 300 cars

Built 1928 with KD brake system

Mineral Red paint, black paint for underframe

ARA cast steel side frame trucks



Canadian National 651460-623768 - 2300 cars

Built 1912 with KC brake system

Black paint

Arch Bar trucks



Canadian Pacific 306500-307499 - 1000 cars

Built 1912 with KC brake system

Black paint

Arch Bar trucks



St-SW (Cotton Belt) 81000-81547 - 548 cars

Built 1914 with KC brake system

Black paint

Arch Bar trucks





And these are close....

A few New York Central Lines had very similar flat
cars with fishbelly center sills and straight side
sills. Lot 208-F includes these 40-ton capacity
cars built in 1907.



CCC&StL 50000- 50249 - 250 cars

CI&S 74557-74856 - 300 cars

MCRR 33000-33499 - 500 cars

NYC&HR 32500-33499 - 1000 cars



Builder images of cars lettered for all four Lines
are among the Westerfield AC&F Collection.

All NYCL cars were built with KC brake systems,
eleven stake pockets, and end sill mounted
vertical hand brake staffs that swing down if
needed for clearances. The Tichy model has twelve
side stake pockets and an end sill mounted
vertical hand brake staff that does not swing away
for clearance.

I don't think decals have been produced for these
NYC flat cars in as-built or later versions.







_____

From: STMFC@...
[mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Friday, December 29, 2017 10:34 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Gould/Tichy 40' flat









Jon,

These cars on the SP&S were numbered 32005-32054,
painted black with white lettering.

Best regards,

David Turner

Keeping the S. P. & S. Ry. alive in Santa Rosa,
California


Re: Cheesy Reefers

Tim O'Connor
 


I sent Al 1960's photos of the WRX version of the ACF reefers, but the
cars were slightly modified from the originals. Definitely could be bashed
if you have the decals.

Tim



I always have wondered why Westerfield never offered their kits for WRX?
Bill Welch


Re: Gould/Tichy 40' flat

Jon Miller <atsfus@...>
 

On 12/30/2017 7:42 AM, 'Eric Hansmann' eric@... [STMFC] wrote:

SP&S 32005-32054 - 50 cars

Built 1924 with KC brake system

Mineral Red paint

USRA Andrews trucks

    I'm getting confused real quick on color.  David Turner just said these were black.  

    Also on the one I finished some time ago was also black (NC&StL 70200-70299).

??????????????????????????? 

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, 
SPROG, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: Cheesy Reefers

Douglas Harding
 

Opps my error on the reporting marks. I got caught up in looking at the buildings.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Saturday, December 30, 2017 9:08 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Cheesy Reefers

 

 

 



---In STMFC@..., <doug.harding@...> wrote :

Another image of the same building & reefers http://www.newglaruspubliclibrary.org/sites/www.newglaruspubliclibrary.org/files/10-2014.JPG

 

Most likely the Marty Co began using the WRN reporting marks at the time of the expansion in 1932. The cars certainly look like ACF reefers

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

======================

Except, as was pointed out earlier, the mark is WRX, which is Western Refrigerator Co., a GB&W affiliate. The cars are undoubtedly on long term lease, to have received the custom paint job, but apparently the Marty Co. never filed for their own mark. Interestingly, Monroe is not on the GB&W, not that it really matters for leased cars.

 

There are photos of WRX cars in custom lettering for several other cheese companies during this period.

 

Dennis Storzek 

 


Re: Epoxy ?

Jim Betz
 

Schuyler,

  Actually that makes sense.  When working with epoxies what I use to
clean my hands is vinegar - it cuts uncured epoxy easily.  And it's
only a little bit smelly ... ;-)  What I do is to put some on my hands
and 'wash' it off with a throw away rag of some sort.  This is normally
only necessary when you have gotten far more epoxy on your hands
that normal and I don't remember ever having to do this when
working with epoxy on a model.

  I have not tried vinegar on cured epoxy.  But your experience
with alcohol sounds like cured epoxy bonds -can- be attacked" ...
if you are willing to wait.
  I suspect that what actually happened was that the alcohol
'dissolved' (broke the bonds) the epoxy 'one layer at a time'
until the weight let go.  I assume you also had to clean up and
repaint the car after those long months soaking in alcohol.
- Jim B.


Re: Cheesy Reefers

Bill Welch
 

I always have wondered why Westerfield never offered their kits for WRX?

Bill Welch


Re: Gould/Tichy 40' flat

Eric Hansmann
 

I compiled prototype data for these models a couple of years ago. The info is pasted below along with an updated link to the Train Life site for the RMJ magazine access.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

 

 

Tichy Flat Car prototypes

Here are some prototype notes for the Tichy Flat car model. This info was distilled form Richard Hendrickson's article in the June 1993 Railmodel Journal. The article begins on page 5.

http://magazine.trainlife.com/rmj_1993_6/

 

NC&StL 70100-70199 - 100 cars

Built 1923 with KD brake system

Mineral Red paint

ARA cast steel side frame trucks

 

NC&StL 70200-70299 - 100 cars

Built 1926 with KC brake system

Mineral Red paint

Dalman Two-Level trucks

 

SP&S 32005-32054 - 50 cars

Built 1924 with KC brake system

Mineral Red paint

USRA Andrews trucks

 

DL&W 16350-16399 - 50 cars

Built 1926 with KC brake system

Mineral Red paint

USRA Andrews trucks

 

T&P 5000-5299 - 300 cars

Built 1928 with KD brake system

Mineral Red paint, black paint for underframe

ARA cast steel side frame trucks

 

Canadian National 651460-623768 - 2300 cars

Built 1912 with KC brake system

Black paint

Arch Bar trucks

 

Canadian Pacific 306500-307499 - 1000 cars

Built 1912 with KC brake system

Black paint

Arch Bar trucks

 

St-SW (Cotton Belt) 81000-81547 - 548 cars

Built 1914 with KC brake system

Black paint

Arch Bar trucks

 

 

And these are close....

A few New York Central Lines had very similar flat cars with fishbelly center sills and straight side sills. Lot 208-F includes these 40-ton capacity cars built in 1907.

 

CCC&StL 50000- 50249 - 250 cars

CI&S 74557-74856 - 300 cars

MCRR 33000-33499 - 500 cars

NYC&HR 32500-33499 - 1000 cars

 

Builder images of cars lettered for all four Lines are among the Westerfield AC&F Collection.

All NYCL cars were built with KC brake systems, eleven stake pockets, and end sill mounted vertical hand brake staffs that swing down if needed for clearances. The Tichy model has twelve side stake pockets and an end sill mounted vertical hand brake staff that does not swing away for clearance.

I don't think decals have been produced for these NYC flat cars in as-built or later versions.

 

 

 


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Friday, December 29, 2017 10:34 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Gould/Tichy 40' flat

 




Jon,

These cars on the SP&S were numbered 32005-32054, painted black with white lettering.

Best regards,

David Turner

Keeping the S. P. & S. Ry. alive in  Santa Rosa, California

 


Re: Cheesy Reefers

destorzek@...
 




---In STMFC@..., <doug.harding@...> wrote :

Another image of the same building & reefers http://www.newglaruspubliclibrary.org/sites/www.newglaruspubliclibrary.org/files/10-2014.JPG


Most likely the Marty Co began using the WRN reporting marks at the time of the expansion in 1932. The cars certainly look like ACF reefers

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

======================

Except, as was pointed out earlier, the mark is WRX, which is Western Refrigerator Co., a GB&W affiliate. The cars are undoubtedly on long term lease, to have received the custom paint job, but apparently the Marty Co. never filed for their own mark. Interestingly, Monroe is not on the GB&W, not that it really matters for leased cars.


There are photos of WRX cars in custom lettering for several other cheese companies during this period.


Dennis Storzek 

 


Re: M3 stuarts on Soo Line flat car in Cincy photo

Bruce Smith
 

Bob,

I believe that you are correct (oops). ;)

Regards
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL
________________________________________
From: STMFC@... <STMFC@...> on behalf of gn2059@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
Sent: Saturday, December 30, 2017 8:41 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: Re: [STMFC] M3 stuarts on Soo Line flat car in Cincy photo

Bruce and Greg,

I believe that Pennsy gon is a G27. The rib arrangement doesn't match the G26. G27s were 52'6" IL. The car is also visibly shorter in length than the 65' NYC car in the background, and the G26 class was a 65' car.

You guys are Pennsy modelers, correct? ;-)

Regards,
Bob "GN fan" Heninger
Minot, ND

------------------------------------
Posted by: gn2059@...
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links


Re: M3 stuarts on Soo Line flat car in Cincy photo

Robert Heninger
 

Bruce and Greg,

I believe that Pennsy gon is a G27. The rib arrangement doesn't match the G26. G27s were 52'6" IL. The car is also visibly shorter in length than the 65' NYC car in the background, and the G26 class was a 65' car.

You guys are Pennsy modelers, correct? ;-)

Regards,
Bob "GN fan" Heninger
Minot, ND


Re: Cheesy Reefers

Douglas Harding
 

Another image of the same building & reefers http://www.newglaruspubliclibrary.org/sites/www.newglaruspubliclibrary.org/files/10-2014.JPG

 

Bob according to the below history, the Carl Marty Co moved into a new location in 1932. A new location indicates expansion, which in turn may have led to the need for reefers. The Carl Marty Co had headquarters in Chicago and several cheese manufacturing plants in Wisconsin.

 

Most likely the Marty Co began using the WRN reporting marks at the time of the expansion in 1932. The cars certainly look like ACF reefers

 

In the middle 30’s (1939 according to one source) the Borden Company purchased the Carl Marty Cheese Company of Monroe, Wisconsin and combined the two companies into the Lakeshire/Marty Company.  The Carl Marty Company was one of the largest manufacturers and assemblers of Swiss cheese in this country.

 

 

From:  https://www.wisconsinhistory.org/Records/Property/HI90127

In 1932, the Carl O. Marty Co. moved from its Cheese Row factory to this plant and until 1939 carried on its very successful butter and cheese manufacturing. This was a local firm founded in 1915 by Carl Marty, Sr., a native of Cnton Thurgau, Switzerland, and most beloved of all the early Swiss leaders of the "Swiss Colony of Wisconsin," as the Swiss region was called (Hamilton, p. 118). He retired in 1922 turning the firm over to his sons. This was one of the area's largest factories. More research may prove it to be the lagest.* *Odell, p. 44-5 notes: Carl Marty and Co., trade sloganed "The Cheese House of America," have the largest manufacturing and storage plant in a single propery in Monroe. "Dutch Maid" is their trade brand in the manufacture of cream, Swiss, limburger, brick and American cheese and creamery butter. Aside from the products of their own manufacture they are extensive buyers with representation by distributors in all of the largest markets. In July, 1929, the Marty company introduced cheese handling from factory to storage on shelves in portable racks by motor truck. These racks are rolled on skids into coolers without other handling. This does away with factory tubbing, untubbing at storage and retubbing for the trade. A cooperage department with Swiss cooper employed makes a distinctive tub bound with white oak bands, resembling in appearance the tubs used in Switzerland. CULTURAL SIGNIFICANCE: Taylor explains (p. 38): Borden purchased the Anglo-Swiss condensery plants in Morow and Dixon in 1903 and reopened the condesery here. The arrival of Borden had a saluatory influence in persuading farmers to cease their customary winter hiatus of milking as they let their cows dry up... New buildings were added as Borden succeeded in promoting more output by farmer suppliers, most of whom delivered their milk in daily wagonloads. The firm also insisted on increasingly higer quality mildk standards. Also see Rosa Waelti Gruenewald THE STORY OF A DAIRY BARN, describing how her father came to build this demonstration barn at the suggestion of Borden, which offered plans and construction supervision.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 


Re: M3 stuarts on Soo Line flat car in Cincy photo

Bruce Smith
 

​Greg,


I'll remind you that the G26 has an inside length of 65' 6" ;)  Thus the top level of the shifted load are likely 72-foot poles as well.


Regards

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL



From: STMFC@... on behalf of tgregmrtn@... [STMFC]
Sent: Saturday, December 30, 2017 1:24 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: Re: [STMFC] M3 stuarts on Soo Line flat car in Cincy photo
 


Bruce and Claus,

Focusing just on the PRR G26 (52' 6" inside) on the RIP track it has a pretty nasty load shift. It is now out of diagram and will have to have the load corrected and secured before moving. Note that the saplings on the near end of car are out of place and pulled inward the telltale sign of the shift.

These appear to be 52 foot poles of a lesser grade or utility pole grade that shifted making them appear to be of mixed length.  The poles in the car in the center of the yard appear to be 72-foot pole IIRC and it is in need of idler cars.

Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean



Sent from AOL Desktop
In a message dated 12/29/2017 8:21:51 PM Pacific Standard Time, STMFC@... writes:

 

 

​Claus,

 

Let's be clear, loading poles on gons to that height was common, as was loading them in that manner.  Note the gon load of long poles in the background, this time with the entire load beling long poles and the drop ends of the gon down.  The gon on the RIP track (PRR G26 class, BTW) looks to have shifter the load on the near end to the side, NOT end to end.  It will likely be jacked or winched until the load is within the boundaries of the car and new side stakes added to replace the once that appear to have broken or slipped.

 

Regards,

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL


From: STMFC@... <STMFC@...> on behalf of 'Claus Schlund' claus@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
Sent: Friday, December 29, 2017 11:38 AM
To: stmfc@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] M3 stuarts on Soo Line flat car in Cincy photo



Hi Mike,

I had noticed the poles extending over the ends of the gondola. I had assumed the gon was loaded where shorter poles were at the bottom, and longer poles were loaded above those, making for an extended load that overhung the end of the car. Of course a shifted load is a much more plausible explanation!

For a gon load situation such as this, would the load be properly repositioned before moving further, or would the gon perhaps simply complete its trip with an impromptu ‘extended load’, possibly with some reinforcing of the existing restraints along with a spacer flat as a companion? It would seem like repositioning the load would be a lot of work and a lot of expense...

Claus Schlund 





Re: Cheesy Reefers

destorzek@...
 

As Ted said, Western Refrigerator Co. Accurail also did this paint scheme, back in Huly of 1998:

Long out of stock, they occasionally show up on E-bay

Dennis Storzek


Re: M3 stuarts on Soo Line flat car in Cincy photo

Eric Hansmann
 

There's another load of those poles on an NYC gondola ear the center of the image. It seems like it has one idler flat car. I would assume there is another on the hidden right end. Note the load "stakes" are similar to those on the RIP track PRR gon.


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN



On December 30, 2017 at 12:24 AM "tgregmrtn@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

Bruce and Claus,

Focusing just on the PRR G26 (52' 6" inside) on the RIP track it has a pretty nasty load shift. It is now out of diagram and will have to have the load corrected and secured before moving. Note that the saplings on the near end of car are out of place and pulled inward the telltale sign of the shift.

These appear to be 52 foot poles of a lesser grade or utility pole grade that shifted making them appear to be of mixed length.  The poles in the car in the center of the yard appear to be 72-foot pole IIRC and it is in need of idler cars.

Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean



Sent from AOL Desktop
In a message dated 12/29/2017 8:21:51 PM Pacific Standard Time, STMFC@... writes:

 

 

​Claus,

 

Let's be clear, loading poles on gons to that height was common, as was loading them in that manner.  Note the gon load of long poles in the background, this time with the entire load beling long poles and the drop ends of the gon down.  The gon on the RIP track (PRR G26 class, BTW) looks to have shifter the load on the near end to the side, NOT end to end.  It will likely be jacked or winched until the load is within the boundaries of the car and new side stakes added to replace the once that appear to have broken or slipped.

 

Regards,

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL


From: STMFC@... <STMFC@...> on behalf of 'Claus Schlund' claus@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
Sent: Friday, December 29, 2017 11:38 AM
To: stmfc@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] M3 stuarts on Soo Line flat car in Cincy photo



Hi Mike,

I had noticed the poles extending over the ends of the gondola. I had assumed the gon was loaded where shorter poles were at the bottom, and longer poles were loaded above those, making for an extended load that overhung the end of the car. Of course a shifted load is a much more plausible explanation!

For a gon load situation such as this, would the load be properly repositioned before moving further, or would the gon perhaps simply complete its trip with an impromptu ‘extended load’, possibly with some reinforcing of the existing restraints along with a spacer flat as a companion? It would seem like repositioning the load would be a lot of work and a lot of expense...

Claus Schlund 


 




Re: Cheesy Reefers

Ted Culotta
 

Hello Bob,

They are WRX reporting marks. Western Refrigerator was the reefer operation of the GB&W, which makes sense give the location of the photo. WRX used AC&F-design reefers from the 1920s, similar to the associated NWX lines. Westerfield and Branchline made kits and there are photos and references in the RP Cyc Vol. 4 as well as in Focus on Freight Cars, Vol. 3 and Steam Freight Cars Reference Manual Vol. 3.

Cheers,
Ted Culotta


Re: M3 stuarts on Soo Line flat car in Cincy photo

Scott H. Haycock
 

It appears to me that every car in this image, that looks like it belongs on the rip track, or has a load issue, has a tag located right next to the reporting marks.

The two B&O box cars look like they have loose, or unsecured loads that have shifted, causing the sides to be pushed outwards, resulting in the carlines collapsing. The car on the left much more so. If you look carefully, or use an index card as a gauge, you can see that the door edges are not vertical, compared to the car ends. Also, the car on the right shows signs of an overloaded underframe (slightly bowed down under the door).

The B&O composite hopper looks overloaded to me. As the load would settle during transit, the load would spill over the top of the sides of the car.

The SOO line flatcar, besides the shifted chocking, appears to have some damage to the decking above the near end sill.

The pole load shifting has already been discussed by others.

The SS boxcar to the left of the B&O hopper, the N&W box car to the right of the tanks, both have similar tags, but I see no obvious damage. 

I'm wondering if it was common for railroads to put repair, or overload tags next to the reporting marks, instead of on the tagboards, possibly to be sure the car's owner would be billed? 

Scott Haycock





 


I agree it's likely a RIP track, but those "tags" are not the reason, as they look like paper that can be found on just about any steam era freight car to indicate lading, destination, etc. You can see such paper tags on many cars in the regular yard even in this photo. The separation of cars, the fact a flat with two tanks is isolated with one tank not chocked fully, and the track adjacent to parts storage while separate from other yard tracks are much stronger evidence. I'm not convinced the poles can fit in the gon, and it is more that there is inadequate bracing or tie downs to prevent shifting that puts in on the RIP track. The shipper tried to put too much in one gon for the railroad's taste to minimize shipping, but didn't put enough bracing to prevent longitudinal shifting. I wonder if the Railroad was desperate enough for the business as the war time shipments wound down in '45 to just fix and deliver, or felt this loading was unfair and decided to either break the load into two goons or put proper bracing and charge the shipper?

Fascinating photo.

Sent from Dave Bott's iPad




Cheesy Reefers

thecitrusbelt@...
 

Undated photo of four WRN (??) reefers used by cheese maker Carl Marty & Company:

 

http://www.nationalhistoriccheesemakingcenter.org/history-of-cheese/

 

If the reporting marks are in fact WRN that would be the Washington Run Railroad Company of Pennsylvania, which had these reporting marks from July 1923 through July 1930.

 

Does anyone know more about these refrigerator cars?

 

Thanks.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: M3 stuarts on Soo Line flat car in Cincy photo

Greg Martin
 

Bruce and Claus,

Focusing just on the PRR G26 (52' 6" inside) on the RIP track it has a pretty nasty load shift. It is now out of diagram and will have to have the load corrected and secured before moving. Note that the saplings on the near end of car are out of place and pulled inward the telltale sign of the shift.

These appear to be 52 foot poles of a lesser grade or utility pole grade that shifted making them appear to be of mixed length.  The poles in the car in the center of the yard appear to be 72-foot pole IIRC and it is in need of idler cars.

Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean



Sent from AOL Desktop

In a message dated 12/29/2017 8:21:51 PM Pacific Standard Time, STMFC@... writes:

 

 

​Claus,

 

Let's be clear, loading poles on gons to that height was common, as was loading them in that manner.  Note the gon load of long poles in the background, this time with the entire load beling long poles and the drop ends of the gon down.  The gon on the RIP track (PRR G26 class, BTW) looks to have shifter the load on the near end to the side, NOT end to end.  It will likely be jacked or winched until the load is within the boundaries of the car and new side stakes added to replace the once that appear to have broken or slipped.

 

Regards,

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL


From: STMFC@... <STMFC@...> on behalf of 'Claus Schlund' claus@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
Sent: Friday, December 29, 2017 11:38 AM
To: stmfc@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] M3 stuarts on Soo Line flat car in Cincy photo



Hi Mike,

I had noticed the poles extending over the ends of the gondola. I had assumed the gon was loaded where shorter poles were at the bottom, and longer poles were loaded above those, making for an extended load that overhung the end of the car. Of course a shifted load is a much more plausible explanation!

For a gon load situation such as this, would the load be properly repositioned before moving further, or would the gon perhaps simply complete its trip with an impromptu ‘extended load’, possibly with some reinforcing of the existing restraints along with a spacer flat as a companion? It would seem like repositioning the load would be a lot of work and a lot of expense...

Claus Schlund 



Re: Epoxy ?

Schuyler Larrabee
 

One point not covered by anyone else (that I’ve read): your original post said once epoxied, never to be apart again.



Well, you have to be extremely patient . . . but my friend Ted Shasta observed that epoxy finishes on furniture carry a warning not to allow alcoholic drinks to sit on the surface for an extended time.



I had a brass model with some weights epoxied inside. Later on, I was kicking myself for doing that so permanently, and remembered what Ted had said. So I put the model in a jar and filled it with 91% alcohol and . . . literally . . . forgot about it. Months later, I came across the jar and was quite pleased indeed to find that the weights were now separated from the model and could be removed. Elapsed time to success: Unknown.



Obviously, limits are involved: objects impervious to alcohol are required. Laminated joints are much less likely to give up. And this isn’t going to work for something you glued together last week and want apart NOW.



But if you don’t mind waiting until IT decides to work, it IS possible.



Schuyler



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Friday, December 29, 2017 7:43 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Epoxy ?





Hi,
Thanks for the replies - they confirm that what I've been doing all along
is a good idea to just keep doing it ... which has been to wait until the
epoxy is fully cured. Typically I set 30 minute epoxy aside for 12 to 24
hours - I mix it on a small piece of hard surface cardboard ... and use
the left over on that piece to test if the cure is complete. The extra
time has always proven to help.
Yes, I did go to Wikipedia and other websites ... before I ever asked
the question ... they were all too sparse on the "practical side" of
epoxy - lots of stuff about how it works and such (without anything
I'd call the "details").

Soooo - no short cuts for epoxy. Sigh. I love the way it provides a
strong bond and is non-conductive. But I'm always careful to only
use it where I won't have to take it apart (ever).
- Jim B.





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Cocoa Beach

Schuyler Larrabee
 

I talked to Bob yesterday. The trailer’s packed and they’re leaving Tuesday for an all-night drive to Cocoa Beach. The good news is that since Prototype Rails attracts so many modelers with such diverse interests, he brings just about the entire stock.



Schuyler



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Friday, December 29, 2017 7:05 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Cocoa Beach





Is there a way to contact him prior to to ask if he could bring certain albums?



Kevin Sprayberry
On Dec 29, 2017, at 6:41 AM, fgexbill@... <mailto:fgexbill@...> [STMFC] <STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC@...> > wrote:



I cannot commit to help Steve but. . .



I think he is up to $8 per print for B&W

Most of his photos are 8x10

You may want to inquire with him if he will send you SFRD stock car photos on speculation meaning you return what you do not want. I know in the past he has done this.



Bill Welch

40961 - 40980 of 195459