Date   
Re: Loss Protection for our freight cars.

Donald B. Valentine
 

    Yes and no, fellows. Model railroad equipment can be scheduled the same way the jewelry, fine arts, cameras and firearms are often covered if you want the best insurance for them. I suspect that at least some 
of you have experience with jewelry floaters on your HO-3 or HO-4 Homeowners Insurance. Such coverage always requires an initial appraisal by someone qualified to provide it to establish the value at which items are covered.When it comes to hobby items one insurance provider might have a different idea of what qualifies a person to be such an appraiser than another but it is still not difficult. With things such as I have addressed here, like jewelry and cameras in particular, such coverage can be a godsend because the degree of coverage
is much more broad. The stone from my mother's wedding ring came out some years ago but I had added a scheduled jewelry floater to my folk's Homeowners coverage as their agent. By blind dumb luck mother found the stone on her bedroom rug. Thus the insurance carrier replaced the original stone with one of the same weight and quality, repairing her ring in the process, took the found stone to have it recut for salvage and everyone was happy. Similarly my father dropped a camera some years ago which was also covered under a special articles floater. The cost to repair the camera was roughly $120 which was fully covered by the extension of coverage that these floaters provide. Having retired in 2006 after nearly 40 years in the commercial casualty & property insurance business I have not kept up on all the changes. But in my active years the 
so-called Chubb deductible of $1000 on a Homeowners policy reduced the price an average of 20%. In those years the use of the special articles floater also eliminated the deductible for the items that were scheduled and the coverage was good any place in the world when traveling. Scheduling a couple hundred pieces of motive power and rolling stock, not to mention putting a value on a layout itself, is not all that difficult once it has been done initially and may be something for some of you to seriously consider. I would also recommend using an independent insurance agency who can choose the best company he or she represents to get you the best coverage at the best price rather than fooling around with direct writers like State Farm (sorry Tony) or Nationwide who can only offer you one company's product.

Happy New Year to all, Don Valentine

Prototype Rails and RR Historical Societies

devansprr
 

Begging the moderator's, and members, indulgence...

Mike Brock has agreed to let a group of us meet after 10 PM Friday night to discuss opportunities for collaboration among railroad historical societies. Any officer (e.g. web master, archivist) or director of a RR historical society that is attending Prototype Rails is welcome to join us.


The intent is to discuss some of the challenges RR historical societies are facing from the standpoint of operating the historical society, with the hope that there may be activities we can collaborate on to reduce costs, save volunteer manpower, and provide more and better services to our members and the public..


Mandatory STMFC content is how the various RR historical societies have preserved equipment drawings important to STMFC modelers. While equipment drawings will not be a topic of discussion, methods of inexpensively digitizing the archives of RR historical societies will be one of several topics discussed to determine if a joint effort can reduce costs and speed delivery of historical information to STMFC modelers.


We will post a notice on the message board late Friday afternoon on the room to be used.


If you are interested, please reply off-list to Dave Evans


We are now returning to your regularly scheduled content...



Re: Loss Protection for our freight cars.

Bob Chaparro
 

Good tips and information, Don.


Thanks for posting.


Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Re: Tichy trains

Paul Doggett <paul.doggett2472@...>
 

Cheers Tim 
Paul 


On 3 Jan 2018, at 02:39, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 


obviously misspelled - train not trains


Has anyone got an email address for Tichy trains as there contact email on the website is not accepting emails neither is info@... it says that they are illegal domains.

Thanks Paul Doggett

Re: Share a room at Cocoa

Jared Harper
 



On Mon, Jan 1, 2018 at 2:45 PM, Jared Harper <harperandbrown@...> wrote:
I will be attending Prototype Rails in Cocoa Beach.  Because of health issues I will be arriving Thursday afternoon and will be leaving saturday evening.  If you need a room for two days contact me.

Jared Harper
Athens, GA

Fowler box car prototype summary

Eric Hansmann
 

Ray Breyer returns to the DesignBuildOp blog with a file of prototype data covering the announced road names of the new Accurail 36-foot Fowler box car models. In addition to modeling tips, Ray included prototype details found while researching the early development of the car design. Here’s the blog post intro with a link to the access site.

 

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/2018/01/03/prototype-data-files-pt-5/

 

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

Prototype Rails and RR Historical Societies

Ken Soroos
 

Hi Dave -

I’d be happy to participate in your session. Dave Leider, our Soo Line Historical and Technical Society President, will also be at Cocoa Beach. I’m an Associate Editor for <the SOO> and Special Projects Chairman for the SLHTS.

Ken Soroos

That Middle Age Gondola Spread

Bob Chaparro
 

This photo is from the Confessions of a Train Geek blog (http://blog.traingeek.ca/) and illustrates what years of service does to a gondola:

 

https://tinyurl.com/ydcfolyh

 

My question is, what techniques can be used to simulate this condition on a model and would a particular brand/model of a gondola in HO scale be a good candidate for this?

 

Thanks.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Southwest Scale Productions

Steven Cerka
 

Good afternoon group.  Does any body know if Southwest Scale Productions is still in business.  Their web site has been down for quite a while and I can't find any mention of their status.  I'm looking for a quantity of their Youngstown doors and a listing of the available doors.  Any help would be appreciated.

Thank you
Steven E. Cerka


NP Lettering Diagrams

rwitt_2000
 

Currently on eBay are several NP lettering diagrams: tank car and express reefer for "fish loading only" ca. 1912.

Bob Witt

https://www.ebay.com/itm/302585464576?ul_noapp=true


Re: That Middle Age Gondola Spread

Jim Betz
 

Bob,

  I've seen 2 or 3 dozen attempts to simulate "load damage" on gondolas
(and even a few on box cars) - using heat from something like a soldering
iron.  I've never seen one that I considered to look 'prototypical'.

  The most common problem is that the effect is usually "too small"
and "too much deformation in too little linear distance".  So, instead
of the general bowing out of the entire length of the side (or any
long length) the modeler ended up with a bowing of only 3 or 4
scale feet (or some were poorly enough done that you could tell
what "brand/size" of soldering iron was used ... *G*).
  The next most was deformations that were simply too much - they
weren't "subtle but noticeable" (like your example showed).
  Some models had both problems.

  I think there -is- a way to do this right ... but I suspect you are
going to have to destroy several gons to "get it right".  Because
you can't expect to be able to learn the technique of how much
heat, for how long, and what size/shape of heat to use ... on the
first attempt.
  I would be tempted to try heat that is applied using a blower
(I have a "shrink wrap heater" from my R/C days that would
probably work) so that the heat could be applied along the
entire side.  The trick, of course, will be to not get heat where
you don't want it (mask it off with some aluminum foil?).

  Another similar kind of damage (just hard use?) is when some
yahoo or other uses the forks of a fork lift to move a box car.
Yes, I've seen them doing this!  The result is either a long
gouge that terminates at the door or a vertical rib ... or even a
hole torn in the skin of the car.  "Hey, Foreman!  I discovered
a faster way to move the railroad cars that doesn't involve
having to get down off of my Yale and hook up the puller."
  I suspect this one is 'simply' a matter of using a heated piece
of metal that is the scale size of one of the tongues of a
fork lift ... and applying heat and force in the correct direction.
  But I've never seen a model that has these marks ... maybe
because nobody makes a soldering iron with the correct
shape tip?  ;-)

  Be careful about how much heat you apply and for how
long.  And don't assume that the plastic on all models will
react the same (yes, you will want to experiment on some
cheap Tyco crap - but when you change to that Red Caboose
the plastic is different and the thickness of the walls is less.
(Don't say you weren't warned.).
- Jim B.

Re: Fowler box car prototype summary

Jim Hayes
 

Kudos to Ray Brewer!  Your 26 page write up on the Fowler is something special. It made me dig out my Westerfield Fowler kit and get back to work on it.

Jim🚂😊

On Wed, Jan 3, 2018 at 9:33 AM, 'Eric Hansmann' eric@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Ray Breyer returns to the DesignBuildOp blog with a file of prototype data covering the announced road names of the new Accurail 36-foot Fowler box car models. In addition to modeling tips, Ray included prototype details found while researching the early development of the car design. Here’s the blog post intro with a link to the access site.

 

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/2018/01/03/prototype-data-files-pt-5/

 

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN


IMWX history

Pierre Oliver
 

Step into the "wayback" machine friends!

I need to confirm a detail about the original IMWX boxcar kits.
When first released the initial offering was a square corner Dreadnaught end?
And then sometime later they offered the "W" corner?

Have I got that in the right order?

Thanks

--
Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com

Re: IMWX history

Tom Vanwormer
 

Yep!
Tom VanWormer
Monument CO

Pierre Oliver pierre.oliver@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

Step into the "wayback" machine friends!

I need to confirm a detail about the original IMWX boxcar kits.
When first released the initial offering was a square corner Dreadnaught
end?
And then sometime later they offered the "W" corner?

Have I got that in the right order?

Thanks

--
Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com

Re: IMWX history

Guy Wilber
 

Pierre Oliver asked:

“I need to confirm a detail about the original IMWX boxcar kits.When first released the initial offering was a square corner Dreadnaught end?
And then sometime later they offered the "W" corner?

Have I got that in the right order?”

No, you have it in reverse order.

The 1937 AAR “Standard” 40’ Box Car with the revised (March 1, 1941) “Rounded” corner end was the first release from IMWX.

The original (1937 design) “Square” corner end was done later by Red Caboose.

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada

Re: IMWX history

Pierre Oliver
 

Guy,

That makes more sense. Which explains why CRMPG had a sq corner end on offer at fist.
But I do have an IMWX kit with sq corner. So IMWX did the molds for both styles

Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com
On 1/06/18 10:26 AM, Guy Wilber guycwilber@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

Pierre Oliver asked:

“I need to confirm a detail about the original IMWX boxcar kits.When first released the initial offering was a square corner Dreadnaught end?
And then sometime later they offered the "W" corner?

Have I got that in the right order?”

No, you have it in reverse order.

The 1937 AAR “Standard” 40’ Box Car with the revised (March 1, 1941) “Rounded” corner end was the first release from IMWX.

The original (1937 design) “Square” corner end was done later by Red Caboose.

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada


Re: IMWX history

Tim O'Connor
 


W-corner was the first.

The S-corner was later, and appeared to be something of a "quickie" piece
of work, as the row of rivets on the side facing corner is very poorly rendered.
But it's all we've got, since Intermountain has never done the S-corner ends
for their kit. I've thought about sanding it, and adding Archer rivets. Has
anyone tried that?

Tim O'Connor



I need to confirm a detail about the original IMWX boxcar kits.
When first released the initial offering was a square corner Dreadnaught
end?
And then sometime later they offered the "W" corner?

Have I got that in the right order?

Thanks

Pierre Oliver

Re: IMWX history

Tim O'Connor
 

Pierre

I've never seen the CRMPG version - does it look better? At the very least
it could be applied to the Intermountain 1937 body.

You know the end I crave? An S-corner 4-5 10'6" replacement for the Proto
2000 box car. This is the end applied to Southern Pacific A-50-12 box cars,
which were the predecessors to the later A-50-14 that the stock kit is good
for. Also the same end was applied to A-50-13 cars, which were basically a
40 foot version of the A-50-12. There may be other railroads who used the
end but I haven't researched it.

Tim O'Connor




That makes more sense. Which explains why CRMPG had a sq corner end on offer at fist.
But I do have an IMWX kit with sq corner. So IMWX did the molds for both styles
Pierre Oliver

Re: IMWX history

Pierre Oliver
 

I imagine that the original CRMPG sq corner 5/5 dreadnaught end would more than satisfy your needs, however that pattern has disappeared over the years since it was rendered superfluous by IMWX tooling up the square corner post car.

Now, if someone out there as an original, unused CRMPG #1137E, I'd be happy to copy it and get it into production

Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com
On 1/06/18 12:42 PM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] wrote:

�

Pierre

I've never seen the CRMPG version - does it look better? At the very least
it could be applied to the Intermountain 1937 body.

You know the end I crave? An S-corner 4-5 10'6" replacement for the Proto
2000 box car. This is the end applied to Southern Pacific A-50-12 box cars,
which were the predecessors to the later A-50-14 that the stock kit is good
for. Also the same end was applied to A-50-13 cars, which were basically a
40 foot version of the A-50-12. There may be other railroads who used the
end but I haven't researched it.

Tim O'Connor




That makes more sense. Which explains why CRMPG had a sq corner end on offer at fist.
But I do have an IMWX kit with sq corner. So IMWX did the molds for both styles
Pierre Oliver

Re: IMWX history

Tony Thompson
 

I think Tom Madden has made that 4-5 end, Tim.
Tony Thompson 


On Jan 6, 2018, at 12:42 PM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Pierre

I've never seen the CRMPG version - does it look better? At the very least
it could be applied to the Intermountain 1937 body.

You know the end I crave? An S-corner 4-5 10'6" replacement for the Proto
2000 box car. This is the end applied to Southern Pacific A-50-12 box cars,
which were the predecessors to the later A-50-14 that the stock kit is good
for. Also the same end was applied to A-50-13 cars, which were basically a
40 foot version of the A-50-12. There may be other railroads who used the
end but I haven't researched it.

Tim O'Connor




That makes more sense. Which explains why CRMPG had a sq corner end on offer at fist.
But I do have an IMWX kit with sq corner. So IMWX did the molds for both styles
Pierre Oliver