Date   

NP Boxcar 200453

thecitrusbelt@...
 

What does the white vertical stripe on this boxcar's door indicate:

 

https://digital.library.cornell.edu/catalog/ss:20434174

 

Thanks.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Train Watering Station

Douglas Harding
 

Ah yes there were stockcars built before 1906 that had water troughs as part of the structure. I have photos that show the water troughs. They were typically filled with a garden hose or a five gallon bucket. The pipes in the photo are a bit excessive for filling the troughs seen on a stockcar.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 8:47 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Train Watering Station

 

 

​Doug,

 

I was thinking of some early stock cars with overhead feed bins and water tanks that precede the livestock rest rules.

 

Regards

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL


From: STMFC@... <STMFC@...> on behalf of 'Doug Harding' doug.harding@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
Sent: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 8:31 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Train Watering Station

 

 

Bruce, not hardly. Livestock had to be unloaded every 28 hrs. that is when they were fed, watered and rested. There are no loading chutes or pens in the photo.

 

If you are thinking of drenching hogs, that was done in transit, ie while the train was slowly moving past the hog drencher as an attendance stood on the box and “hosed down” the stockcars containing hogs. The nozzles were horizontal, aimed at the sides of the cars. As seen in this photo http://ctr.trains.com/~/media/images/the-way-it-was/photo-of-the-day/large-images/photo-of-the-day/2017/03/20170314.jpg?mw=750

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 8:13 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Train Watering Station

 

 

Folks,

 

Any chance that this could be for watering livestock?  The standpipes look quite big for that... but ?

 

Regards

Bruce Smith

Auburn Al


From: STMFC@... <STMFC@...> on behalf of Al Kresse water.kresse@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
Sent: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 3:22 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Train Watering Station

 

 Very interesting.  Somebody understand how it worked?  Al

On January 17, 2018 at 4:00 PM "thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

 This is a link to a photo from the Louisiana Digital Library

http://louisianadigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/hnoc-clf%3A3045​

The title says the subject is a train watering station. Is this correct or did this item have some other use, such as wetting down loads in open top cars?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

 


Re: Train Watering Station

Bruce Smith
 

​Doug,


I was thinking of some early stock cars with overhead feed bins and water tanks that precede the livestock rest rules.


Regards

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL


From: STMFC@...
Sent: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 8:31 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Train Watering Station
 


Bruce, not hardly. Livestock had to be unloaded every 28 hrs. that is when they were fed, watered and rested. There are no loading chutes or pens in the photo.

 

If you are thinking of drenching hogs, that was done in transit, ie while the train was slowly moving past the hog drencher as an attendance stood on the box and “hosed down” the stockcars containing hogs. The nozzles were horizontal, aimed at the sides of the cars. As seen in this photo http://ctr.trains.com/~/media/images/the-way-it-was/photo-of-the-day/large-images/photo-of-the-day/2017/03/20170314.jpg?mw=750

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 8:13 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Train Watering Station

 

 

Folks,

 

Any chance that this could be for watering livestock?  The standpipes look quite big for that... but ?

 

Regards

Bruce Smith

Auburn Al


From: STMFC@... <STMFC@...> on behalf of Al Kresse water.kresse@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
Sent: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 3:22 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Train Watering Station

 

 Very interesting.  Somebody understand how it worked?  Al

On January 17, 2018 at 4:00 PM "thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

 This is a link to a photo from the Louisiana Digital Library

http://louisianadigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/hnoc-clf%3A3045​

The title says the subject is a train watering station. Is this correct or did this item have some other use, such as wetting down loads in open top cars?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA




Re: Train Watering Station

Douglas Harding
 

Bruce, not hardly. Livestock had to be unloaded every 28 hrs. that is when they were fed, watered and rested. There are no loading chutes or pens in the photo.

 

If you are thinking of drenching hogs, that was done in transit, ie while the train was slowly moving past the hog drencher as an attendance stood on the box and “hosed down” the stockcars containing hogs. The nozzles were horizontal, aimed at the sides of the cars. As seen in this photo http://ctr.trains.com/~/media/images/the-way-it-was/photo-of-the-day/large-images/photo-of-the-day/2017/03/20170314.jpg?mw=750

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 8:13 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Train Watering Station

 

 

Folks,

 

Any chance that this could be for watering livestock?  The standpipes look quite big for that... but ?

 

Regards

Bruce Smith

Auburn Al


From: STMFC@... <STMFC@...> on behalf of Al Kresse water.kresse@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
Sent: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 3:22 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Train Watering Station

 

 Very interesting.  Somebody understand how it worked?  Al

On January 17, 2018 at 4:00 PM "thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

 This is a link to a photo from the Louisiana Digital Library

http://louisianadigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/hnoc-clf%3A3045​

The title says the subject is a train watering station. Is this correct or did this item have some other use, such as wetting down loads in open top cars?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Train Watering Station

Bruce Smith
 

Folks,


Any chance that this could be for watering livestock?  The standpipes look quite big for that... but ?


Regards

Bruce Smith

Auburn Al


From: STMFC@... on behalf of Al Kresse water.kresse@... [STMFC]
Sent: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 3:22 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Train Watering Station

 Very interesting.  Somebody understand how it worked?  Al
On January 17, 2018 at 4:00 PM "thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]" wrote:

 This is a link to a photo from the Louisiana Digital Library

http://louisianadigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/hnoc-clf%3A3045​

The title says the subject is a train watering station. Is this correct or did this item have some other use, such as wetting down loads in open top cars?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


B&O P-11 Flat Car Photos Needed

Chris Adams
 

I'm working on an F&C P-11 flatcar kit and Ted Culotta was kind enough to send me some great decals. The decal instruction sheet includes 2 decent reference photos of this car, but it'd be great to have more photo references to aid in proper lettering.


Actual photos, links to photos, or - and perhaps especially - references to where to find photos, would be super helpful. I'm starting the fun (and I mean that sincerely) but time-consuming (also true) process of leafing through all my reference materials looking for needles in the haystacks.


My chosen era is October, 1948 - though of course any photos from around that time would be awesome.


Thanks for any help/direction you can offer!

Best regards,

Chris

http://www.thevalleylocal.net

Modeling the New Haven Railroad's Connecticut Valley Line in October 1948.


Re: Train Watering Station

benjamin
 

The ship in the background is on the Mississippi river at or near New Orleans.  The Mississippi river water level is above ground level in the New Orleans area.   The deposits at the loading station nearest the camera look like sand or silt. 
1) This could be a place where spoils from dredging were loaded on cars to be dumped away from populated areas, although dredges would have and still do put out more volume than just ten car loads at a time.
2) Some granulated mineral that could be unloaded in a slurry mixed with river water?

Ben Heinley.  Denver, Co.


Re: Train Watering Station

Nelson Moyer
 

Having lived in Baton Rouge for four years, freezing is the last thing I would think of ; )

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 5:37 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Train Watering Station

 

 

I thought that the stack was a flare that would take care of vapors off crude oil loads. The headers along the ground might be various petroleum products that might be loaded.

But a flare is not going to come out of a structure, but it could be a heating boiler stack. Keeping water from freezing before loaded into cars?

Tom Birkett, Bartlesville, OK

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 4:48 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Train Watering Station

I can’t believe this complex was intended for filling tenders. Perhaps this is a ‘filling station’ for tank cars carrying water.

Nelson Moyer

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 3:22 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Train Watering Station

Very interesting. Somebody understand how it worked? Al

On January 17, 2018 at 4:00 PM "thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] <mailto:thecitrusbelt@...%20[STMFC]> " <STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC@...> > wrote:

This is a link to a photo from the Louisiana Digital Library

<http://louisianadigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/hnoc-clf%3A3045> http://louisianadigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/hnoc-clf%3A3045

The title says the subject is a train watering station. Is this correct or did this item have some other use, such as wetting down loads in open top cars?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Train Watering Station

Tom Birkett <tnbirke@...>
 

I thought that the stack was a flare that would take care of vapors off crude oil loads. The headers along the ground might be various petroleum products that might be loaded.

But a flare is not going to come out of a structure, but it could be a heating boiler stack. Keeping water from freezing before loaded into cars?

Tom Birkett, Bartlesville, OK



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 4:48 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Train Watering Station





I can’t believe this complex was intended for filling tenders. Perhaps this is a ‘filling station’ for tank cars carrying water.



Nelson Moyer



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 3:22 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Train Watering Station





Very interesting. Somebody understand how it worked? Al



On January 17, 2018 at 4:00 PM "thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] <mailto:thecitrusbelt@...%20[STMFC]> " <STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC@...> > wrote:













This is a link to a photo from the Louisiana Digital Library







<http://louisianadigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/hnoc-clf%3A3045> http://louisianadigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/hnoc-clf%3A3045







The title says the subject is a train watering station. Is this correct or did this item have some other use, such as wetting down loads in open top cars?







Bob Chaparro



Hemet, CA












[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Train Watering Station

Richard Townsend
 

My guess it that it was used for filling tank cars with water. As has been noted, there is no oil on the ground or on the spouts. I recall reading about trains of tank cars bringing potable water to the Florida Keys, and maybe this was for some similar purpose in Louisiana.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Nelson Moyer npmoyer@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Wed, Jan 17, 2018 2:50 pm
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Train Watering Station

 
I can’t believe this complex was intended for filling tenders. Perhaps this is a ‘filling station’ for tank cars carrying water.
 
Nelson Moyer
 
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 3:22 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Train Watering Station
 
 
Very interesting.  Somebody understand how it worked?  Al
 
On January 17, 2018 at 4:00 PM "thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

 
 
 
 
 
 
This is a link to a photo from the Louisiana Digital Library
 
 
 
 
 
 
The title says the subject is a train watering station. Is this correct or did this item have some other use, such as wetting down loads in open top cars?
 
 
 
Bob Chaparro
 
Hemet, CA
 
 

 


Re: Train Watering Station

Nelson Moyer
 

I can’t believe this complex was intended for filling tenders. Perhaps this is a ‘filling station’ for tank cars carrying water.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 3:22 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Train Watering Station

 

 

Very interesting.  Somebody understand how it worked?  Al

 

On January 17, 2018 at 4:00 PM "thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is a link to a photo from the Louisiana Digital Library

 

 

 

http://louisianadigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/hnoc-clf%3A3045

 

 

 

The title says the subject is a train watering station. Is this correct or did this item have some other use, such as wetting down loads in open top cars?

 

 

 

Bob Chaparro

 

Hemet, CA

 

 


 


Re: Train Watering Station

Douglas Harding
 

Looks like a place to fill tank cars, ie top loading. As it says “watering station” possibly a location to fill cars with potable water? Note the wheel house of a ship in the background, behind what appears to be a levy. Maybe a towboat? And it appears another one showing just a large star on the stack. Location along a river or canal? The building to the right with the tall stack and vented windows could be a pump house. Everything looks to clean to be an oil or petroleum loading facility. No signs of spilled oil anywhere on the ground, and the pipes have no oily residue or accumulation.

 

Interesting photo.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 


Re: Train Watering Station

Charles Morrill
 

The facility is for loading or unloading oil tank cars.  Note the bridge of a ship in the background.
 
Charlie
 

From: Al Kresse water.kresse@... [STMFC]
Sent: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 3:22 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Train Watering Station
 


Very interesting.  Somebody understand how it worked?  Al

 

On January 17, 2018 at 4:00 PM "thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

 


 


 


 


 


 

This is a link to a photo from the Louisiana Digital Library


 

 


 

http://louisianadigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/hnoc-clf%3A3045


 

 


 

The title says the subject is a train watering station. Is this correct or did this item have some other use, such as wetting down loads in open top cars?


 

 


 

Bob Chaparro


 

Hemet, CA


 


 


 


Re: Train Watering Station

Al Kresse <water.kresse@...>
 

Very interesting.  Somebody understand how it worked?  Al


On January 17, 2018 at 4:00 PM "thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is a link to a photo from the Louisiana Digital Library

 

 

 

http://louisianadigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/hnoc-clf%3A3045

 

 

 

The title says the subject is a train watering station. Is this correct or did this item have some other use, such as wetting down loads in open top cars?

 

 

 

Bob Chaparro

 

Hemet, CA

 

 


 


Train Watering Station

thecitrusbelt@...
 

This is a link to a photo from the Louisiana Digital Library

 

http://louisianadigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/hnoc-clf%3A3045

 

The title says the subject is a train watering station. Is this correct or did this item have some other use, such as wetting down loads in open top cars?

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


IM 1958cuft LO with type 3 hatches

Eric Mumper
 

Group,


In the latest new product release, Intermountain is showing 1958 cuft covered hoppers with the Murphy standing seam roof and type 3 hatches and locking bars for several railroads.  All that is shown on the site at this time is artwork and I have seen some emails implying IM has tooled the new type 3 hatches and locking bars.


There are several shows coming up in the next few weeks and I was hoping someone on the list would be going to one that Intermountain happens to be at as well and could report back on these cars.  I would like to see pictures of test shots or something to see how well they have done.  The standing seam roof has been done a long time ago and it is ok, but not great since injection molding is not capable of creating the rivets on the seam caps properly.  The roof Pierre did is much better.


Here is the link to the IM coming soon page:

http://www.intermountain-railway.com/newshocomingsoon.html


And here is a link to the Q cars:

http://www.intermountain-railway.com/ho/html/48686.htm


Eric Mumper



Re: Westerfield composite gondola kit and scratchbuild of same

Anspach Denny <danspachmd@...>
 

Wow! Beautiful work. It puts my own Ambroid/Northeastern model of the same car to shame (and I though it was pretty good….).

Denny

Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento, CA 95864


Re: West India Fruit Boxcar In Southern Calif.

rwitt_2000
 

We had extensive discussions in 2009 about these cars in the Frost Collection in the City of Vancouver Archives.

West India Fruit & Steamship #106 and #321

https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/STMFC/search/messages?query=West%20India%20Fruit%20%26%20Steamship%20%23106%20and%20%23321


Bob Witt


Re: Bob's Photos at the Big E

Dave Owens
 

Here is the Bob's Photo information for the West Springfield show.

Bob will be at:
Regency Inn and Suites
21 Baldwin St.
West Springfield, Mass.

His hours are:
Friday, Jan. 26, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 27, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Sunday, Jan. 28, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Bob said he'll be in the "special event" room.

Baldwin Street is one of the streets that runs north off of Memorial
Boulevard, across from the fairgrounds.

Dave Owens
West Hartford, Conn.

On Tue, Jan 16, 2018 at 6:14 PM, 'Schuyler Larrabee'
schuyler.larrabee@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
"Across the street" is, in my experience, not
sufficiently clear. What's the hotel's name??



And BTW, Bob doesn't "do" email. You have to call
him. 606 845 3323



Schuyler



From: STMFC@...
[mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, January 16, 2018 11:18 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Bob's Photos at the Big E





Earl

He takes a room at the hotel across the street.

Tim O'Connor



Can anyone tell me if/where Bob Liljestrand will
be at the upcoming show in West Springfield, MA?
Can anyone share his current email address?
TIA,
Earl Tuson









------------------------------------
Posted by: "Schuyler Larrabee" <schuyler.larrabee@...>
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links



Re: Westerfield composite gondola kit and scratchbuild of same

 

Lester – Excellent job. – Al Westerfield

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: frograbbit602@... [STMFC]
Sent: Tuesday, January 16, 2018 2:33 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Westerfield composite gondola kit and scratchbuild of same

 
Hello,

I have finished a Westerfield composite gondola, kit number 2501, and scratch build of the same in 2006.  I have posted the photos and writeup to my blog I started to share photos and writeup on rolling stock, etc. of modeling projects on my Minneapolis & Northland Railroad Company.    It is only my second post to the blog which I continue to improve.  If you would like to take a look please do at the following:

http://mnrailroadcab100.blogspot.com/

Thanks,
Lester Breuer





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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