Date   

Re: Any Photos of circa 1960's Detroit Toledo Shore Line 50 ft Auto Box Cars?

Al Kresse <water.kresse@...>
 

Does anyone have photos of the DTSL 50-ft double auto box cars that would be Pooled with other railroad's auto box cars at the plants?  All I get searching are photos of models it seems.


Al Kresse


PFE Reefers In Mail Service

thecitrusbelt@...
 

Courtesy of Michael Bartolic, here is a link to a photo of PFE reefers being used to handle the Christmas mail rush:

 

http://ctr.trains.com/~/media/images/the-way-it-was/photo-of-the-day/large-images/photo-of-the-day/2017/05/20170508.jpg?mw=1000&mh=800

 

Caption: “A long string of Pacific Fruit Express reefers is being loaded with mail at right as workers sort mail bags at the Union Pacific Transfer in Council Bluffs, Iowa, during the 1951 Christmas rush. At busy times like this, all available equipment was pressed into mail service.”

 

Santa Fe reefers also saw similar use.

 

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railroad Citrus Industry Modeling Group

https://groups.io/g/RailroadCitrusIndustryModelingGroup


Re: NP Boxcar 200453

Rufus Cone
 

The car number implies it is assigned to maintenance of way / company service.

--
Rufus Cone
Bozeman, MT


Re: Tru-color paint

Nelson Moyer
 

I called Tru Color to ask the same question and was told that acetone was a relatively minor ingredient in the thinner and there are several others ingredients. They don’t recommend thinning paint with Acetone, but Acetone is fine for cleanup. Of course, they sell a pint of thinner for $43.95, so why wouldn’t they say that. Apparently, thinning with acetone alone changes the handling and drying characteristics of the paint, particularly the shiny finish.

 

Jon, your question raised other questions. Why do you want to thin the paint? Tru Color claims it’s ready to spray without thinning, and I’ve painted ten cars so far shooting straight paint at 20 psi with a gravity feed airbrush. I think thinning would require more coats than straight paint. I’m curious, how many modelers thin vs. not thin, and how many coats do you average for thinned vs not thinned?

 

One problem I’ve noticed with Tru Color is that the bottle caps aren’t always tight on the shelves, and I’ve had evaporative losses up to 3-4 ml. per bottle before I caught it. I don’t know if the caps weren’t tightened properly at the plant, or the worked loose due to temperature changes, but I suspect I’ve had some of both. I brought up the new bottles to full volume with Tru Color thinner, then really tightened the caps hard. So far, I haven’t had additional evaporative loss. Now I always check the volume, add thinner if necessary, and tighten the cap on all new bottles.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 18, 2018 12:11 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Tru-color paint

 

 

    Not having quick access to thinner is acetone* an acceptable thinner?  For the paint cup only or to be added to the jar?

 

* or would MEK be better?

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, 
SPROG, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: NP Boxcar 200453

earlyrail
 

In 1958 the entire 200xxx series was company service,

Howard Garner


Re: NP Boxcar 200453

Douglas Harding
 

Jim the photo is from the U.S. President's Railroad Commission Photographs collection. The Commission was formed in late 1960 to settle the issue of removing firemen from train crews. It asked for photos to document their workpaces. So most of the photos are from 1960 or just slightly earlier. https://digital.library.cornell.edu/collections/railroad

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 


Re: NP Boxcar 200453

np328
 

 Charlie, 
you are right about the renumbering.
      This series of numbers (200xxx) indicate company service at this point. 
I would agree with Bob as it being a patch (unpainted wood) and nothing more.
Once in company service, the car has been downgraded to the ranks of the walking dead. Any major repair and it is the end of the line for this car. 
     I wish the photo was in color as it would be interesting to see (in color) what looks to be corrosion on the radial roof. 
     And of roofs, look down in the foreground at the paint on the Great Northern boxcar roof. The boards on the roof look to be in good shape and unpainted. Note variation on the boards on the roof to the right. 
     Also, note the condition of the wooden caboose near the wedge plow. The wedge plow appears to be a former ore car, which is now supporting weeds growing from the ballast load it holds. 
     Behind the turntable and lone evergreen, is what I think to be a building that would have held the distillates used in the early part of the last century. The NP (and many other railroads) would mix to home brew specs, the lubricating oils, the lamp light oils, and other oils used in railroad service. Note how high the fire walls are. If you did this on a model it would be sure to bring questions of accuracy forward.  

     I am more of a steam era guy and not so good on diesel spotting. The diesel with the dynamic brake blister (if that is the correct term) might provide a date frame to this photo. That and the autos near the rotary plow tender. 

     As soon as I get to the archives, I will look up the life of this railroad car in question.
                                                                                                                        Jim Dick    NPRHA archivist.


Re: Tru-color paint

Tim O'Connor
 


For CLEANING the airbrush, yes.

On a model? You are taking a risk! Normal concentration of acetone is about 1/3,
and the normal concentration of MEK is a little more than 1/3. But there are two
other solvents as well. YMMV.

Tim O'Connor




Not having quick access to thinner is acetone* an acceptable thinner? For the paint cup only or to be added to the jar?

* or would MEK be better?

Jon Miller


Re: NP Boxcar 200453

Tim O'Connor
 


It's an NP company service number - this car is not in revenue service.

I concur the "stripe" is a door repair.

I think this is the same prototype as Rapido's model - 10000 to 13999.

Tim O'Connor


It looks like the 200453 might be a re-number.  Any idea what the original series might have been?
Charlie


Re: NP Boxcar 200453

John Monrad
 

On Jan 18, 2018 1:04 PM, "'Charles Morrill' badlands@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

It looks like the 200453 might be a re-number.  Any idea what the original series might have been?
 
Charlie


Re: Tru-color paint

Scott
 

On the label of thier thinner the only ingredient they list is acetone. I wouldnt mix it in the paint bottle for sure paint cup only.

Scott McDonald


Tru-color paint

Jon Miller <atsfus@...>
 

    Not having quick access to thinner is acetone* an acceptable thinner?  For the paint cup only or to be added to the jar?


* or would MEK be better?

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, 
SPROG, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: NP Boxcar 200453

Charles Morrill
 

It looks like the 200453 might be a re-number.  Any idea what the original series might have been?
 
Charlie
 

From: thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]
Sent: Thursday, January 18, 2018 11:00 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] NP Boxcar 200453
 


What does the white vertical stripe on this boxcar's door indicate:

 

https://digital.library.cornell.edu/catalog/ss:20434174

 

Thanks.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: NP Boxcar 200453

Robert Heninger
 

That is a patch of some kind, possibly thin metal, or perhaps wood. These types of patches show up all the time on double sheathed NP and GN boxcars in the later 1950s and 1960s. I think they are a simple RIP track expedient during an era when milled car siding might not always be available, especially on roads that might not have any DS boxcars on their rosters.

Some I have seen are thin sheet metal, others are plywood or boards simply nailed to the car side.

I believe the light color is a coincidence, and not in any way an indicator of special service.

Regards,
Bob Heninger
Minot, ND


Re: NP Boxcar 200453

Jon Miller <atsfus@...>
 

On 1/18/2018 9:00 AM, thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] wrote:

What does the white vertical stripe on this boxcar's door indicate:

    Don't know but I like how they note the plow to the left but totally neglect the rotary by the TT:-)

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, 
SPROG, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


NP Boxcar 200453

thecitrusbelt@...
 

What does the white vertical stripe on this boxcar's door indicate:

 

https://digital.library.cornell.edu/catalog/ss:20434174

 

Thanks.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Train Watering Station

Douglas Harding
 

Ah yes there were stockcars built before 1906 that had water troughs as part of the structure. I have photos that show the water troughs. They were typically filled with a garden hose or a five gallon bucket. The pipes in the photo are a bit excessive for filling the troughs seen on a stockcar.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 8:47 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Train Watering Station

 

 

​Doug,

 

I was thinking of some early stock cars with overhead feed bins and water tanks that precede the livestock rest rules.

 

Regards

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL


From: STMFC@... <STMFC@...> on behalf of 'Doug Harding' doug.harding@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
Sent: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 8:31 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Train Watering Station

 

 

Bruce, not hardly. Livestock had to be unloaded every 28 hrs. that is when they were fed, watered and rested. There are no loading chutes or pens in the photo.

 

If you are thinking of drenching hogs, that was done in transit, ie while the train was slowly moving past the hog drencher as an attendance stood on the box and “hosed down” the stockcars containing hogs. The nozzles were horizontal, aimed at the sides of the cars. As seen in this photo http://ctr.trains.com/~/media/images/the-way-it-was/photo-of-the-day/large-images/photo-of-the-day/2017/03/20170314.jpg?mw=750

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 8:13 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Train Watering Station

 

 

Folks,

 

Any chance that this could be for watering livestock?  The standpipes look quite big for that... but ?

 

Regards

Bruce Smith

Auburn Al


From: STMFC@... <STMFC@...> on behalf of Al Kresse water.kresse@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
Sent: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 3:22 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Train Watering Station

 

 Very interesting.  Somebody understand how it worked?  Al

On January 17, 2018 at 4:00 PM "thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

 This is a link to a photo from the Louisiana Digital Library

http://louisianadigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/hnoc-clf%3A3045​

The title says the subject is a train watering station. Is this correct or did this item have some other use, such as wetting down loads in open top cars?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

 


Re: Train Watering Station

Bruce Smith
 

​Doug,


I was thinking of some early stock cars with overhead feed bins and water tanks that precede the livestock rest rules.


Regards

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL


From: STMFC@...
Sent: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 8:31 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Train Watering Station
 


Bruce, not hardly. Livestock had to be unloaded every 28 hrs. that is when they were fed, watered and rested. There are no loading chutes or pens in the photo.

 

If you are thinking of drenching hogs, that was done in transit, ie while the train was slowly moving past the hog drencher as an attendance stood on the box and “hosed down” the stockcars containing hogs. The nozzles were horizontal, aimed at the sides of the cars. As seen in this photo http://ctr.trains.com/~/media/images/the-way-it-was/photo-of-the-day/large-images/photo-of-the-day/2017/03/20170314.jpg?mw=750

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 8:13 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Train Watering Station

 

 

Folks,

 

Any chance that this could be for watering livestock?  The standpipes look quite big for that... but ?

 

Regards

Bruce Smith

Auburn Al


From: STMFC@... <STMFC@...> on behalf of Al Kresse water.kresse@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
Sent: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 3:22 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Train Watering Station

 

 Very interesting.  Somebody understand how it worked?  Al

On January 17, 2018 at 4:00 PM "thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

 This is a link to a photo from the Louisiana Digital Library

http://louisianadigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/hnoc-clf%3A3045​

The title says the subject is a train watering station. Is this correct or did this item have some other use, such as wetting down loads in open top cars?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA




Re: Train Watering Station

Douglas Harding
 

Bruce, not hardly. Livestock had to be unloaded every 28 hrs. that is when they were fed, watered and rested. There are no loading chutes or pens in the photo.

 

If you are thinking of drenching hogs, that was done in transit, ie while the train was slowly moving past the hog drencher as an attendance stood on the box and “hosed down” the stockcars containing hogs. The nozzles were horizontal, aimed at the sides of the cars. As seen in this photo http://ctr.trains.com/~/media/images/the-way-it-was/photo-of-the-day/large-images/photo-of-the-day/2017/03/20170314.jpg?mw=750

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 8:13 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Train Watering Station

 

 

Folks,

 

Any chance that this could be for watering livestock?  The standpipes look quite big for that... but ?

 

Regards

Bruce Smith

Auburn Al


From: STMFC@... <STMFC@...> on behalf of Al Kresse water.kresse@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
Sent: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 3:22 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Train Watering Station

 

 Very interesting.  Somebody understand how it worked?  Al

On January 17, 2018 at 4:00 PM "thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

 This is a link to a photo from the Louisiana Digital Library

http://louisianadigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/hnoc-clf%3A3045​

The title says the subject is a train watering station. Is this correct or did this item have some other use, such as wetting down loads in open top cars?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Train Watering Station

Bruce Smith
 

Folks,


Any chance that this could be for watering livestock?  The standpipes look quite big for that... but ?


Regards

Bruce Smith

Auburn Al


From: STMFC@... on behalf of Al Kresse water.kresse@... [STMFC]
Sent: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 3:22 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Train Watering Station

 Very interesting.  Somebody understand how it worked?  Al
On January 17, 2018 at 4:00 PM "thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]" wrote:

 This is a link to a photo from the Louisiana Digital Library

http://louisianadigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/hnoc-clf%3A3045​

The title says the subject is a train watering station. Is this correct or did this item have some other use, such as wetting down loads in open top cars?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

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