Date   

Re: [resinfreightcars] Madden Insulated 8k-gal Tank Car Body FS

Brent Greer
 

Hi John, I'll take it if it's still available.

Brent
________________________________
Dr. J. Brent Greer


From: resinfreightcars@... on behalf of John Golden golden1014@... [resinfreightcars]
Sent: Sunday, January 28, 2018 6:03:12 AM
To: Yahoogroups; resinfreightcars@...
Subject: [resinfreightcars] Madden Insulated 8k-gal Tank Car Body FS
 
 

Gentlemen,
I have a Tom Madden tank car body FS--the "Insulated ICC-104 8,000-gal, ACF Type 27" model.  This is the resin tank car shell with dome only.  Asking $15 plus add $2 to help me with shipping.  If interested please contact me offline at Golden1014@....
 
John Golden
Albersbach, Germany

2018 St. Louis RPM: 20-21 July in Collinsville, Illinois http://icg.home.mindspring.com/rpm/stlrpm.htm
RPM Blog: https://railroadprototypemodeler.wordpress.com/


Re: Width over side sheets for CNW/CMO USRA DS rebuilds

Benjamin Scanlon
 

Gday Norman

The width over side sheets is the one i'm interested in because in TT scale I've got a 1932 ARA/AAR car and a 1937 AAR ... and its easy to measure width over side sheets on an existing model .. so I just want to know how wide a model of the CNW/RI rebuild ought to be relative to those.  

I'll have a look at finding the Shake N Take group. 

Cheers, Ben Scanlon



Madden Insulated 8k-gal Tank Car Body FS

golden1014
 

Gentlemen,
I have a Tom Madden tank car body FS--the "Insulated ICC-104 8,000-gal, ACF Type 27" model.  This is the resin tank car shell with dome only.  Asking $15 plus add $2 to help me with shipping.  If interested please contact me offline at Golden1014@....
 
John Golden
Albersbach, Germany

2018 St. Louis RPM: 20-21 July in Collinsville, Illinois http://icg.home.mindspring.com/rpm/stlrpm.htm
RPM Blog: https://railroadprototypemodeler.wordpress.com/


Re: How Do You Store Your ACC?

Garth Groff or Sally Sanford <sarahsan@...>
 

Friends,

Most cyanoacrylites will keep for years in the refrigerator. I have some Fletchtight archery adhesive that is over 11 years old and is still liquid. It has been stored in the basement refrigerator. Obviously I don't use this stuff often.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿

On 1/27/18 10:43 PM, 'Doug Harding' doug.harding@... [STMFC] wrote:
 

I’ll second the recommendation for Loctite brand. I’ve had a bottle on the workbench for over a year. It has not turned solid, nor has it clogged. The first bottle of ACC that I can remember not turning solid. It helps to keep humidity under control. In the summer I run a dehumidifier in the basement and central air, but I live in the Midwest where humidity can get well over 90% in the summer, and down to single digits in the winter. Which is why I am amazed at how long the bottle of Loctite ACC has lasted. Used it to repair a loose part on a steam era freight car just two weeks ago, which survived the latest op session with no further issues.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org


Re: Width over side sheets for CNW/CMO USRA DS rebuilds

Greg Martin
 

Ben and all,

I think I can answer many of Ben's questions after all the research for SHAKE-N-TAKE© in 2014 .

BTW Ben Homm has the second hand rebuilds pretty well covered. I will see what I can add.

In context

Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean



Ben Scalon comments:

"Believe from an earlier comment that I cannot find (Yahoo Groups search capacity not being what it was) that many USRA DS rebuilds were taken out to the width of a 1932 ARA/AAR boxcar, so that would be taking the inside width from 8'9" (??) to 9'4", IIRC."

The inside width of the CNW/RI design was 9' 2-1/16"

The width over the side sills was 8' 6-5/8" 

The width over the Upper and Lower Eves was (up) 10' 4-1/16" (lower) 10' 4-3/8"

 

I try not to make generalizations,  there were many commonalities but as much alike they all differed.  

It depends on the era they were rebuilt. There was variation and lots of roads rebuilt USRA DS and USRA SS freight cars. I find them all interesting.

 

Martin Lofton's article in RMC ids a good starting point , certainly only scratches the surface.

 

"However, I am unsure of the width over side sheets?"

 

I am not sure why this would be important? If you are scratch building you might need to know the thicknesses of the material overlapping the side sheathing. There are several 1937 AAR 10' IH  cars in good condition at he railway/ trolley museum that might help for those rebuilt later to '37 spec's like the Santa Fe cars.  

"Further, does anyone know what the width over side sheets (or at least inside width, if that is unknown) was for the C&NW/CMO cars? These were CNW 65000-67418 and CMO 36100-37098"

 

If you were to join the SHAKE-N-TAKE Yahoo Group most of this would be easily sovled as we did the car at Cocoa Beach in 2014 and followed along after the event. The data we accumulated was generously shared for free and with the Sunshine kit long go this is a great way to model several variations of the car. I still have ends and sills for the CNW/CMO/RI cars. We improved the side sheathing that was wrong on other offerings as well.   

 

"As the CNW rebuilds were done between 1937-40 and the last 200 for the Omaha Road were rebuilt in 1941, I'm wondering if they took the car out to the same width as the then current 1937 AAR boxcar?  

Regards

Ben Scanlon"

Yes Ben but not exactly. Sign on and Feed You Head.

 

 

 



Re: How Do You Store Your ACC?

Douglas Harding
 

I’ll second the recommendation for Loctite brand. I’ve had a bottle on the workbench for over a year. It has not turned solid, nor has it clogged. The first bottle of ACC that I can remember not turning solid. It helps to keep humidity under control. In the summer I run a dehumidifier in the basement and central air, but I live in the Midwest where humidity can get well over 90% in the summer, and down to single digits in the winter. Which is why I am amazed at how long the bottle of Loctite ACC has lasted. Used it to repair a loose part on a steam era freight car just two weeks ago, which survived the latest op session with no further issues.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Saturday, January 27, 2018 8:53 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: How Do You Store Your ACC?

 

 

Have you checked websites like Loctite for storage suggestions Bob?

 

Bill Welch


Re: How Do You Store Your ACC?

Schuyler Larrabee
 

My ACC is on the bench, no special precautions, and it lasts a long enough time – months – that I’m not distressed if I have to buy some more.



Schuyler



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Saturday, January 27, 2018 8:44 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] How Do You Store Your ACC?





As most of you know, ACC ("super glue") is very sensitive to moisture. If stored in the open, even with the cap on, enough moisture will be drawn in to activate the ACC and harden it in the container. I've had this happen more than a few times, especially with the larger containers of ACC in gel form.



I've heard of modelers storing ACC in a sealed bag in the freezer compartment of a refrigerator as one way to prevent spoilage. I assume this works.



And I know some modelers just buy the very small tubes and assume they will harden before they can be completely used.



What methods do you use to store and preserve ACC?



Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: How Do You Store Your ACC?

Bill Welch
 

Have you checked websites like Loctite for storage suggestions Bob?

Bill Welch


Re: How Do You Store Your ACC?

al_brown03
 

I store ACC in a Mason jar containing desiccant. 

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


How Do You Store Your ACC?

thecitrusbelt@...
 

As most of you know, ACC ("super glue") is very sensitive to moisture. If stored in the open, even with the cap on, enough moisture will be drawn in to activate the ACC and harden it in the container. I've had this happen more than a few times, especially with the larger containers of ACC in gel form.

 

I've heard of modelers storing ACC in a sealed bag in the freezer compartment of a refrigerator as one way to prevent spoilage. I assume this works.

 

And I know some modelers just buy the very small tubes and assume they will harden before they can be completely used.

 

What methods do you use to store and preserve ACC?

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: 6650 - GTW 583000 Series Autocar - appropriate trucks?

Tony Thompson
 

Brian Leppert wrote:

 

"Increased spring capacity trucks" were a 1920s' attempt to solve the harmonic oscillation problem.  At that time, 40/50 ton trucks had only four springs per side frame and these trucks added two more for a total of six springs per side frame.  Perhaps the best known was the Dalman 2-Level design where the springs were arranged in a 2-2-2 pattern with the middle row sitting farther out from the center line . . .


      As any Cyc back to the beginning of the 20the century will show, what look like single springs in trucks usually are in fact pairs of springs, one inside the other, and oppositely wound with a different spring rate. So what looks like a six-spring truck is really twice that. But as modelers we naturally just count the springs we can see.
        I discussed these aspects of truck design in my article in _Model Railroad Hobbyist_ in the issue of September 2016.


Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: 6650 - GTW 583000 Series Autocar - appropriate trucks?

Robert kirkham
 

Lots of good information here – thanks Brian and Marty.  It’s difficult to even find an image of the Eastern Car Works  9074s on line.   

 

I had been drifting toward the Tahoe Barber Lateral Motion 50 ton trucks, as the inner side of the triangular opening each side of the spring/bolster area seemed to resemble the truck I can almost see in a photo of GTW 441304 – a single door/end door boxcar.      But presumably that’s a different arrangement than for the door and a half cars.

 

Rob

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Saturday, January 27, 2018 2:05 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] 6650 - GTW 583000 Series Autocar - appropriate trucks?

 



I’ll add that When I was editing Ed Beaudette’s article on the CV 41000 series cars I got the recommendation for the ECW  trucks from Richard Hendrickson.

Since I don’t find the ECW trucks all that reliable on these cars I’ve used the Tahoe Dalman trucks - not correct but certainly more reliable. 

Marty McGuirk

 


On Jan 27, 2018, at 4:15 PM, brianleppert@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

GTW's 40' single-sheathed, door and a half auto cars, series 583200-584701, were built by the Pressed Steel Car Co. and rode on their "increased spring capacity trucks".

"Increased spring capacity trucks" were a 1920s' attempt to solve the harmonic oscillation problem.  At that time, 40/50 ton trucks had only four springs per side frame and these trucks added two more for a total of six springs per side frame.  Perhaps the best known was the Dalman 2-Level design where the springs were arranged in a 2-2-2 pattern with the middle row sitting farther out from the center line.

Symington offered a truck with six springs with a 2-1-1-2 pattern.

Pressed Steel Car Co. (who built these cars) also had an "increased spring capacity truck", again with six springs per side frame, set two rows of three springs each, all parallel the the rail.  Visible from track side were three springs at the front.

The Mainline Modeler article was in the December 1987 issue.  August 2001 Model Railroader had a four page article, with drawings, on Central Vermont's identical auto cars, also built by Pressed Steel Car Co.  Two quotes from that:

"The cars rode on cast steel ARA U-section trucks with spring planks and Barber lateral motion bolsters equipped with six springs per side frame--a style called "increased spring capacity trucks" by several manufacturers."

"The closest is the Eastern Car Works HO no. 9074 70-ton "Bettendorf" truck."

Brian Leppert
Tahoe Model Works
Carson City, NV

please visit  www.resincarworks.com/tahoe.htm  





Re: H0 brass W&R NP wood box car - good paint job?

Todd Sullivan
 

Hi Johannes,

According to my January 1952 Official Railway Equipment Register, the 16000-17499 and 17500-17899 series were both occupied by all steel AAR 1937 design boxcars, so the first model offered on eBay (NP 17397) is correct for an earlier era.  This same ORER shows the 14500-14999 series to have 490 cars, so the second model (40' outside braced car, NP 14902) is the correct design, but the lettering style is an earlier NP style appropriate for the 1930s and 1940s.  (The reweigh date on the model is "BD 10-32" for Brainerd ND in October 1932.)

As others have noted, Yarmouth Models offers a really nice kit for a similar NP double sheathed boxcar for less, and Sunshine Models did offer a model of the NP 14500-14999 series cars that turns up on eBay from time to time.  The Sunshine kit number is #65.1.  Also, Rapido has another NP double sheathed boxcar in development - NP series 10000-13999 - which were much more numerous and were widely used across the U.S.  See their website at https://rapidotrains.com/ho-np-boxcar/ for details.

Todd Sullivan


Re: FEC 17001 ventilated cars

Nelson Moyer
 

Rob,

I attached a scan of a print of the DVD file. MR disabled copy and save, so the only option is to print and scan. Unfortunately, the DVD scan is awful, so the print is also awful. I tried to darken the image using the scanner software, but that made the photo too dark and didn't help the drawing. Sorry, but this is the best I can do.

Nelson

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Friday, January 26, 2018 10:41 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] FEC 17001 ventilated cars


I'll look for a copy of that issue Bill - thanks!

Rob

From: STMFC@...<mailto:STMFC@...> [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 25, 2018 7:50 PM
To: STMFC@...<mailto:STMFC@...>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] FEC 17001 ventilated cars





Rob,

I had the same problem . . . Model Railroader of December, 1975, page 59. I checked the internet for a used magazine vendor to obtain my copy. Expensive but worth it for the wealth of data. (Bill Welch may be able to provide photos of his model.)

Regards



From: Robert kirkham rdkirkham@... [STMFC]<mailto:rdkirkham@...%20[STMFC]>
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 10:37 PM
To: STMFC@...<mailto:STMFC@...>
Subject: [STMFC] FEC 17001 ventilated cars

I'm working on a model of the car end for these cars for another modeller, but so far am working from a poor ¾ view photo and the basic dimensions of murphy ends. It would be useful to obtain dimensions for the height and width of the car bodies. As a CPR modeller, I don't have that sort of information in my resources.. If there are drawings or dimensions available, I'd sure appreciate it.

Thanks in advance

Rob Kirkham








[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: 6650 - GTW 583000 Series Autocar - appropriate trucks?

Marty McGuirk
 

I’ll add that When I was editing Ed Beaudette’s article on the CV 41000 series cars I got the recommendation for the ECW  trucks from Richard Hendrickson.
Since I don’t find the ECW trucks all that reliable on these cars I’ve used the Tahoe Dalman trucks - not correct but certainly more reliable. 
Marty McGuirk



On Jan 27, 2018, at 4:15 PM, brianleppert@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

GTW's 40' single-sheathed, door and a half auto cars, series 583200-584701, were built by the Pressed Steel Car Co. and rode on their "increased spring capacity trucks".

"Increased spring capacity trucks" were a 1920s' attempt to solve the harmonic oscillation problem.  At that time, 40/50 ton trucks had only four springs per side frame and these trucks added two more for a total of six springs per side frame.  Perhaps the best known was the Dalman 2-Level design where the springs were arranged in a 2-2-2 pattern with the middle row sitting farther out from the center line.

Symington offered a truck with six springs with a 2-1-1-2 pattern.

Pressed Steel Car Co. (who built these cars) also had an "increased spring capacity truck", again with six springs per side frame, set two rows of three springs each, all parallel the the rail.  Visible from track side were three springs at the front.

The Mainline Modeler article was in the December 1987 issue.  August 2001 Model Railroader had a four page article, with drawings, on Central Vermont's identical auto cars, also built by Pressed Steel Car Co.  Two quotes from that:

"The cars rode on cast steel ARA U-section trucks with spring planks and Barber lateral motion bolsters equipped with six springs per side frame--a style called "increased spring capacity trucks" by several manufacturers."

"The closest is the Eastern Car Works HO no. 9074 70-ton "Bettendorf" truck."

Brian Leppert
Tahoe Model Works
Carson City, NV

please visit  www.resincarworks.com/tahoe.htm  


Re: 6650 - GTW 583000 Series Autocar - appropriate trucks?

brianleppert@att.net
 

GTW's 40' single-sheathed, door and a half auto cars, series 583200-584701, were built by the Pressed Steel Car Co. and rode on their "increased spring capacity trucks".

"Increased spring capacity trucks" were a 1920s' attempt to solve the harmonic oscillation problem.  At that time, 40/50 ton trucks had only four springs per side frame and these trucks added two more for a total of six springs per side frame.  Perhaps the best known was the Dalman 2-Level design where the springs were arranged in a 2-2-2 pattern with the middle row sitting farther out from the center line.

Symington offered a truck with six springs with a 2-1-1-2 pattern.

Pressed Steel Car Co. (who built these cars) also had an "increased spring capacity truck", again with six springs per side frame, set two rows of three springs each, all parallel the the rail.  Visible from track side were three springs at the front.

The Mainline Modeler article was in the December 1987 issue.  August 2001 Model Railroader had a four page article, with drawings, on Central Vermont's identical auto cars, also built by Pressed Steel Car Co.  Two quotes from that:

"The cars rode on cast steel ARA U-section trucks with spring planks and Barber lateral motion bolsters equipped with six springs per side frame--a style called "increased spring capacity trucks" by several manufacturers."

"The closest is the Eastern Car Works HO no. 9074 70-ton "Bettendorf" truck."

Brian Leppert
Tahoe Model Works
Carson City, NV

please visit  www.resincarworks.com/tahoe.htm  


Re: H0 brass W&R NP wood box car - good paint job?

Scott
 

Honestly if you are are handy at resin building get the truss rod car from Yarmouth or have Pierre build you one. The Yarmouth car looks a lot nicer then that one.

http://www.yarmouthmodelworks.com/index.php/ResinModelKits/YMW-102

Scott McDonald


Re: New Model: Tangent GATC 1917-Design 10,000 Gallon Radial Course Tank Car

Dave Boss
 

Hi David 
               Thank you for another tank car. Just Great! I would like to know if you have any undec black 8000,or 10,000 Radial cars, and insulated cars with AB brakes before I order? Also do the kits come with AB brakes ?

                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Best Regards Dave Boss

On Friday, January 26, 2018, 11:34:35 PM EST, tangentscalemodels@... [STMFC] wrote:


 

Live from Springfield MA at the Railway Hobby Show:

 

Tangent Scale Models is proud to introduce our next ALL-NEW freight car replica, the General American 10,000 Gallon 1917-Design Radial Course Tank Car.  This is an ALL-NEW model that has never been offered before in HO scale plastic!  (Radial course means the tank’s steel panels overlap each other, looking like “stairsteps”).  This is our THIRD all-new 1917-Design radial course tank car design released – the previous two were 8,000 gallon designs, while this one is 10,000 gallons!

 

By the end of World War I, U.S. production of oil and oil-related products was sharply increasing thanks to the combination of war-related demands as well as demands from home.  In order to move oil and new consumer products, tank car producers introduced new car designs.  In 1917 General American Tank Car introduced a new general service 10,000 gallon non-insulated tank car.  Built in East Chicago, IN, these cars were easily identifiable by their circumferential rivets that surrounded the tank body, with notably different heights between the courses.  These “radial course” tank cars utilized steel bolster plates that rise up vertically to hold the tank in place, complete with a “web” section behind to minimize steel consumption.  At a time of fairly monochromatic box cars plying the rails, most consumable products and oil shippers proudly displayed their company markings on the tanks.  This car design was no exception, with Sinclair being a dominant purchaser of tank cars of this type.  Additionally, many smaller oil shippers had fleets of these cars during the oil boom years.  Finally, as many oil businesses failed, the cars ended up back with GATC and were restenciled with new owner markings and were placed back into service for a new owner.  Between Sinclair, Humble Oil, Hercules Powder Company, and other schemes to come in future releases, think of this as one of the first “crude oil” tank cars of consequence.  Forget boring present day tanks.  These cars were the most prolific tank cars built during the first tank car building boom, and were found everywhere from 1917 to 1970. 

 

The Tangent Scale Models GATC 1917-Design 10,000 Gallon Insulated Tank Car starts exactly where our “state of the art” 8,000 gallon tank car left off, which we released in 2016.  Our highly-detailed tank car model includes details accurate for each paint scheme, including KC- or AB-brake variations, with or without Cardwell draft sill springs, and different hand brakes.  Other visually-distinctive details for our models include the “see through” bolster section, circumferential rivets, and differing course heights.  Our RTR models include correct “true-to-life” colors and “hyper-accurate” lettering including exact fonts and lettering placement.  Finally, our scale replicas operate as well as they look, equipped with free-rolling all-metal wheels and Kadee® scale couplers, meaning our models are truly ready to run.  

                                                                                   

Our new ready to operate replicas are available for sale now at www.tangentscalemodels.com and we are selling these cars at the Amherst Railway Society show in Springfield MA on January 27-28, 2018!

 

These replicas will certainly be eye-catchers on your layout!  Check out the radial courses – they look like nothing else in HO!  Our first stunning release includes the following three paint schemes:

 

- HOX "Humble Petroleum Products" 1935+ has a silver-painted carbody with “Humble Petroleum Products” stenciling within red logos on the side of the car.  The remaining tank stenciling is black, while the frame stenciling is correctly rendered in white.  As always, this scheme comes directly from a prototype car that matches our model, which is displayed on our website.  Humble operated gas stations under the Humble name brand, as well as Esso, Enco, and Carter.  Humble was acquired by Standard Oil of New Jersey in 1959, but this car represents the period prior to that event.  These cars were used to ship refined oil products for Humble, which operated gas stations located across most of the United States, with emphasis away from both coasts, making them broadly applicable to many railroads in North America.  Our Humble Petroleum 1935+ replicas come with era-correct K-brakes and they are available in four different road numbers.

 

- SRDX "Sinclair" 1947+ with beautiful “SINCLAIR” graphics on the side of the black carbody, with the small “REF’D OIL” stenciling to indicate the commodity hauled in these tank cars.  Sinclair tank cars were nationwide roamers for sure, and our model has the accurate silver color stenciling for Sinclair’s GATC fleet of 1917-Design tank cars.  Based upon the small brake stencil and tank psi test lettering, this car is accurately stenciled for service in 1947 and onward.  The car’s other lettering shows a 1920 car build date.  The expansion dome has the typical Sinclair silver “dot” stencil on it.  These cars are complete with an era-appropriate AB-brake system, matching the photo on the Tangent site, which displays a well-worn car in 1957.  These stunning cars are available in six road numbers.  And don’t forget, Sinclair had the largest shipper-owned tank car fleet in North America in 1950, with virtually all of them having large billboard lettering, so don’t miss out!

 

- UTLX "Hercules Powder" 1949+ has a black-painted carbody with typical UTLX graphics from the post-war period.  This car is leased to Hercules for shipping of various chemicals.  While Hercules originally produced munitions powders, aka “gunpowder,” it eventually provided many chemicals from plants all over the USA, including but not limited to acetone, cotton cellulose, rosins (for paper stiffening), gums, and turpentine.  Our HO replica includes accurate yellow stenciling for “Hercules Power Company, Wilmington Delaware” on the side of the car.  This model is complete with the classic image of Roman god Hercules on the side.  Check out the detail on our Hercules stenciling!  Our Hercules Powder cars come with an era-correct AB-brake system, and these stunners are available in four road numbers.

 

- Undecorated RTR Black cars are fully assembled and painted black and are ready for decaling! 

 

- Undecorated Unpainted Kits are available as well.  When you gripe that “no one” makes kits anymore, well, here they are.  These are ready for building or kitbashing, and paint and decals.  These models have a K-brake system.  These are great for those who desire to build their own.  Don’t miss out on these!

 

Features for these awesome replicas include:

- Circumferential riveted tank body and riveted underframe (count ‘em, there are many!)

- Radial course tank body – note the “stairstep” appearance!

- All-new underframe for the GATC 1917-design

- “See-through” cast knee above the bolsters

- Accurate dome appliances

- Dimensionally-correct hazardous placards with accurate hole detail

- Separately applied tank handrail

- Separately applied tank strap detail

- KC- or AB- brake variations depending on the prototype car

- Inclusion of Cardwell draft sill springs depending on the prototype car, otherwise “oval” frame openings where the springs were removed

- Different hand brake appliance options depending on the prototype car

- Highly correct “true to life” colors

- “Hyper-Accurate” lettering including exact fonts and lettering placement, including lettering applied to the underframe and air reservoir

- Durable wire grab irons and coupler lift bars

- Separate air hoses

- “Near-scale” draft gear box with side detail

- Kadee® “scale-head” couplers

- CNC-machined 33” wheels in high-quality Tangent Scale Models ASF cast steel truck with spring plank and with separate brake beams

- Replacement semi-scale wheels available separately from Tangent

- Multiple road numbers for each scheme - these cars often traveled in "groups" of more than one

- Recommended age 14 years and older

 

Don’t miss out on the Tangent Scale Models General American 10,000 gallon 1917-design radial course tank car!  Just like its prototype, this car will stand out on any layout situated from 1917 to 1970, and they went everywhere!

 

Pricing for RTR models is $44.95.  High-resolution images showing these fine replicas are available at www.tangentscalemodels.com  and our site also includes prototype images for your reference as well.

 

That wraps up our update for today, and thank you for supporting the family-owned businesses in our industry! 

 

David Lehlbach

Tangent Scale Models - “Unparalleled scale replicas for discriminating railroad modelers”

www.tangentscalemodels.com


Re: New Model: Tangent GATC 1917-Design 10,000 Gallon Radial Course Tank Car

Garth Groff or Sally Sanford <sarahsan@...>
 

Friends,

The new Tangent General American 10K tank cars include Sinclair!
I only need one for my small layout, and I immediately ordered from Tangent this morning. Since my sweetheart is a Sinclair descendant (no, not from the oil line), having Sinclair tank cars on my layout is good policy.

Accurate Sinclair and subsidiary UNPX tanks have been hard to come by up to now with only a few types available, and those representing mostly smaller lots. AC&F Type 11 8K in both high and low running board configurations are available from F&C. Jacketed and unjacketed AC&F Type 21 10K cars have been offered by Proto 2000.

I'm still hoping Tangent will do Sinclair in the next release of their 8K tanks. This was among their most common types (according to Richard Hendrickson's 1998 article in UNION PACIFIC MODELER, the best Sinclair article available). A pair would complete my needs.

Yours Aye,

Garth Groff 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿


On Sat, Jan 27, 2018 at 4:34 AM, tangentscalemodels@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote (in part):

Tangent Scale Models is proud to introduce our next ALL-NEW freight car replica, the General American 10,000 Gallon 1917-Design Radial Course Tank Car.  This is an ALL-NEW model that has never been offered before in HO scale plastic!  (Radial course means the tank’s steel panels overlap each other, looking like “stairsteps”).  This is our THIRD all-new 1917-Design radial course tank car design released – the previous two were 8,000 gallon designs, while this one is 10,000 gallons!

By the end of World War I, U.S. production of oil and oil-related products was sharply increasing thanks to the combination of war-related demands as well as demands from home.  In order to move oil and new consumer products, tank car producers introduced new car designs.  In 1917 General American Tank Car introduced a new general service 10,000 gallon non-insulated tank car.  Built in East Chicago, IN, these cars were easily identifiable by their circumferential rivets that surrounded the tank body, with notably different heights between the courses.  These “radial course” tank cars utilized steel bolster plates that rise up vertically to hold the tank in place, complete with a “web” section behind to minimize steel consumption.  At a time of fairly monochromatic box cars plying the rails, most consumable products and oil shippers proudly displayed their company markings on the tanks.  This car design was no exception, with Sinclair being a dominant purchaser of tank cars of this type.  Additionally, many smaller oil shippers had fleets of these cars during the oil boom years.  Finally, as many oil businesses failed, the cars ended up back with GATC and were restenciled with new owner markings and were placed back into service for a new owner.  Between Sinclair, Humble Oil, Hercules Powder Company, and other schemes to come in future releases, think of this as one of the first “crude oil” tank cars of consequence.  Forget boring present day tanks.  These cars were the most prolific tank cars built during the first tank car building boom, and were found everywhere from 1917 to 1970. 

The Tangent Scale Models GATC 1917-Design 10,000 Gallon Insulated Tank Car starts exactly where our “state of the art” 8,000 gallon tank car left off, which we released in 2016.  Our highly-detailed tank car model includes details accurate for each paint scheme, including KC- or AB-brake variations, with or without Cardwell draft sill springs, and different hand brakes.  Other visually-distinctive details for our models include the “see through” bolster section, circumferential rivets, and differing course heights.  Our RTR models include correct “true-to-life” colors and “hyper-accurate” lettering including exact fonts and lettering placement.  Finally, our scale replicas operate as well as they look, equipped with free-rolling all-metal wheels and Kadee® scale couplers, meaning our models are truly ready to run.  

Our new ready to operate replicas are available for sale now at www.tangentscalemodels.com and we are selling these cars at the Amherst Railway Society show in Springfield MA on January 27-28, 2018!

These replicas will certainly be eye-catchers on your layout!  Check out the radial courses – they look like nothing else in HO!  Our first stunning release includes the following three paint schemes . . .

- SRDX "Sinclair" 1947+ with beautiful “SINCLAIR” graphics on the side of the black carbody, with the small “REF’D OIL” stenciling to indicate the commodity hauled in these tank cars.  Sinclair tank cars were nationwide roamers for sure, and our model has the accurate silver color stenciling for Sinclair’s GATC fleet of 1917-Design tank cars.  Based upon the small brake stencil and tank psi test lettering, this car is accurately stenciled for service in 1947 and onward.  The car’s other lettering shows a 1920 car build date.  The expansion dome has the typical Sinclair silver “dot” stencil on it.  These cars are complete with an era-appropriate AB-brake system, matching the photo on the Tangent site, which displays a well-worn car in 1957.  These stunning cars are available in six road numbers.  And don’t forget, Sinclair had the largest shipper-owned tank car fleet in North America in 1950, with virtually all of them having large billboard lettering, so don’t miss out!


Re: H0 brass W&R NP wood box car - good paint job?

Bruce Smith
 

​Johannes,


Well, for your dates you would definitely have to change the reweigh date (which is DMS 11-37) ;) 


Regards,

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL


From: STMFC@... <STMFC@...> on behalf of j.markwart@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
Sent: Saturday, January 27, 2018 7:13 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] H0 brass W&R NP wood box car - good paint job?