Date   

PFE/Western Pacific Reefer

thecitrusbelt@...
 

PFE Western Pacific reefer used for a wine shipment promotion. At first glance the banner appears to be a darkroom addition, however, notice the shadows under the ladder rungs at the right end of the car.

 

http://louisianadigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/hnoc-clf%3A7204

 

E. G. Lyons & Raas Company was based in San Francisco. Here is a sample wine label:

 

http://digitallibrary.californiahistoricalsociety.org/object/2313

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Ho Scale Atlas U.P. 1950's 70 ton Hart Ballast Hopper (Trucks)

brianleppert@att.net
 

The Union Pacific HK-70-1 hoppers rode on 70-ton Barber S-2a trucks.  Notice the wedge shapes inside the bolster ends.  The newest HO version of this prototype is offered by Rapido.  I feel it is well proportioned, but falls short of proper wheel base.

I tried answering your question on Saturday but my post still hasn't showed up.

Brian Leppert
Tahoe Model Works
Carson City, NV

please visit www.resincarworks.com/tahoe.htm


Santa Fe Potato Traffic ca. 1953

rwitt_2000
 

A company PR booklet ca. 1953 currently on eBay, but probably not to factual.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/362226318581?ul_noapp=true

Bob Witt



Re: Dry Flow Tank Cars ?

Richard Townsend
 

There was an article in the September 2013 RMC by Mike Evans about kitbashing the Barrett LTA cars from a Tichy tank car. The result was outstanding.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Garth Groff or Sally Sanford sarahsan@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Mon, Jan 29, 2018 3:24 am
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Dry Flow Tank Cars ?

 
Jim and Friends,

This type of car was classed as "LT" or "LTA". LT is defined in my 1958 ORER as "A permanently enclosed car having a cylindrical body for handling certain dry powdered or granular commodities . . . . Inside of body provided with mechanical means to expedite unloading. LTA uses the same definition, but lacks the unloading mechanism.

GATX (LT) 33000-33053 are listed in my ORER, but the "number of cars" column is empty, suggesting these had recently been retired or altered to some other classification. In addition, GATX (LTA) series 34000-34099 is also empty. One other GATX LTA series with mixed numbers in the 31XXX and 32XXX ranges shows eight cars in service.

GATX series 33000 is listed with outside length of 40'. GATX 34000 had an outside length of 31' 10". The mixed series had a length of 38' 2". No other dimensions are listed. From the photo of 33000, it appears that an Athearn 40' single-dome tank car might make a good start for a kitbash.

I also found Barret Division of Allied Chemical with 96 LTA cars listed as BMX 800-899 with an outside length of 36'; and four BMX 827, 838, 845 and 896 listed as exceptions with a different capacity.

Chicago Freight Car & Parts Company operated four LT cars under the CFRX reporting marks.

United States Railway Equipment Co. operated two LT cars as USEX 101-102.

A builder's photo of American Cyanamid Co.s CYX 102 is found in Gregg's TRAIN SHED CYCLOPEDIA No. 38. No cars of this type are among the CYX listings in 1958.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 1/28/18 11:29 PM, jcdworkingonthenp@... [STMFC] wrote:
 
  Sorry if this has been discussed here prior. I could not find anything in posts. 
While researching, this came up..from page 605 of a 1932 Railway Age is an article on General American Dry-Flo tank cars. Wondering if anyone has a sense of how many of these cars were built. Covered hoppers are still in the future a bit. 
   In the 50s, were these still running? 

 Has anyone ever produced a model (HO) of these? 

                             Thank you in advance.            Jim Dick  - St. Paul                                                                    



Re: Dry Flow Tank Cars ?

Douglas Harding
 

Thanks to Garth, I have the proper ARA designations, so I check my Jan 1941 ORER. No listing for the MSTL car, as I suspected. I doubt the contract was renewed after the original 10 month commitment. Among the information I received from Gene Green about the MSTL car, was a mechanical record for GATX 34000, dated 1-27-37. So this may have been the actual car leased to the MSTL. It indicates the car was built 2-17 by Warren, classed as LO and had a capacity of 10140 gallons. And was weighed on 10-36 at 46800.

 

In the 1941 ORER I found the following listed for General American in the tank car section, not under covered hoppers, with no indication of how many cars in each class.

LT 33000-33019

LT 33020

LT 33021-33030

LO 33031-33049

ARA EXP 33050

LO 33051-33054

LO 34000-34499

 

In the NMRA issued 1943 ORER was the number of cars in each class.

LT 33000-33019, six cars listed

LT 33020, one car

LT 33021-33030, six cars

LO 33031-33049, eighteen cars

ARA EXP 33050 reclassed as TL, one car

LO 33051-33053, three cars

LO 33054 reclassed as TM, one car

LO 34000-34099, two cars (note number series changed)

 

From the number series it would appear that General American anticipated building more cars than they actually did.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Monday, January 29, 2018 5:25 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Dry Flow Tank Cars ?

 

 

Jim and Friends,

This type of car was classed as "LT" or "LTA". LT is defined in my 1958 ORER as "A permanently enclosed car having a cylindrical body for handling certain dry powdered or granular commodities . . . . Inside of body provided with mechanical means to expedite unloading. LTA uses the same definition, but lacks the unloading mechanism.

GATX (LT) 33000-33053 are listed in my ORER, but the "number of cars" column is empty, suggesting these had recently been retired or altered to some other classification. In addition, GATX (LTA) series 34000-34099 is also empty. One other GATX LTA series with mixed numbers in the 31XXX and 32XXX ranges shows eight cars in service.

GATX series 33000 is listed with outside length of 40'. GATX 34000 had an outside length of 31' 10". The mixed series had a length of 38' 2". No other dimensions are listed. From the photo of 33000, it appears that an Athearn 40' single-dome tank car might make a good start for a kitbash.

I also found Barret Division of Allied Chemical with 96 LTA cars listed as BMX 800-899 with an outside length of 36'; and four BMX 827, 838, 845 and 896 listed as exceptions with a different capacity.

Chicago Freight Car & Parts Company operated four LT cars under the CFRX reporting marks.

United States Railway Equipment Co. operated two LT cars as USEX 101-102.

A builder's photo of American Cyanamid Co.s CYX 102 is found in Gregg's TRAIN SHED CYCLOPEDIA No. 38. No cars of this type are among the CYX listings in 1958.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 1/28/18 11:29 PM, jcdworkingonthenp@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

  Sorry if this has been discussed here prior. I could not find anything in posts. 

While researching, this came up..from page 605 of a 1932 Railway Age is an article on General American Dry-Flo tank cars. Wondering if anyone has a sense of how many of these cars were built. Covered hoppers are still in the future a bit. 

   In the 50s, were these still running? 

 

 Has anyone ever produced a model (HO) of these? 

 

                             Thank you in advance.            Jim Dick  - St. Paul                                                                    

 

 


Re: How Do You Store Your ACC?

Gary McMills
 

I keep mine in a ziplock bag on the work bench,works good.

Gary McMills 



----- Original Message -----
From:
STMFC@...

To:

Cc:

Sent:
28 Jan 2018 21:34:52 +0000
Subject:
[STMFC] Re: How Do You Store Your ACC?


 

Ditto here for Loctite.  I don't have to worry about storage, because I use it up too fast!


-- John


Re: Ho Scale Atlas U.P. 1950's 70 ton Hart Ballast Hopper (Trucks)

Bryian Sones
 

From "Union Pacific Freight Cars1936-51" by Terry Metcalfe photos it's a little difficult for me to tell for sure but I'm guessing these might be Barber Lateral Motion Trucks? Can anyone confirm for me please?
I'm modeling 1956-58, so I'm sure Bettendorf Trucks will do as well but I'm trying to model a few of these cars from the photos in the book.

Thanks,

Bryian Sones
Union Pacific Prototype Modeler
Murrieta, CA


On Friday, January 26, 2018 7:36 PM, Bryian Sones wrote:


Hi All,

I'm in the process of adding the missing bolster to 35 of the early Atlas release of this car.
Can anyone recommend a correct and good replacement truck for this project?

Thanks,

Bryian Sones
Union Pacific Prototype Modeler
Murrieta, CA 



Re: Dry Flow Tank Cars ?

Garth Groff or Sally Sanford <sarahsan@...>
 

Jim and Friends,

This type of car was classed as "LT" or "LTA". LT is defined in my 1958 ORER as "A permanently enclosed car having a cylindrical body for handling certain dry powdered or granular commodities . . . . Inside of body provided with mechanical means to expedite unloading. LTA uses the same definition, but lacks the unloading mechanism.

GATX (LT) 33000-33053 are listed in my ORER, but the "number of cars" column is empty, suggesting these had recently been retired or altered to some other classification. In addition, GATX (LTA) series 34000-34099 is also empty. One other GATX LTA series with mixed numbers in the 31XXX and 32XXX ranges shows eight cars in service.

GATX series 33000 is listed with outside length of 40'. GATX 34000 had an outside length of 31' 10". The mixed series had a length of 38' 2". No other dimensions are listed. From the photo of 33000, it appears that an Athearn 40' single-dome tank car might make a good start for a kitbash.

I also found Barret Division of Allied Chemical with 96 LTA cars listed as BMX 800-899 with an outside length of 36'; and four BMX 827, 838, 845 and 896 listed as exceptions with a different capacity.

Chicago Freight Car & Parts Company operated four LT cars under the CFRX reporting marks.

United States Railway Equipment Co. operated two LT cars as USEX 101-102.

A builder's photo of American Cyanamid Co.s CYX 102 is found in Gregg's TRAIN SHED CYCLOPEDIA No. 38. No cars of this type are among the CYX listings in 1958.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 1/28/18 11:29 PM, jcdworkingonthenp@... [STMFC] wrote:
 

  Sorry if this has been discussed here prior. I could not find anything in posts. 

While researching, this came up..from page 605 of a 1932 Railway Age is an article on General American Dry-Flo tank cars. Wondering if anyone has a sense of how many of these cars were built. Covered hoppers are still in the future a bit. 

   In the 50s, were these still running? 

 Has anyone ever produced a model (HO) of these? 

                             Thank you in advance.            Jim Dick  - St. Paul                                                                    




Re: More reefers

np328
 

  

In the later part of this string, Doug Harding ponders on post 155409, “For each reefer of beef do I also need a reefer hauling potatoes? Another hauling fresh vegetables, and yet another hauling fruit.” 

    I found this 1928 Railway Age on-line via Google digitized books and on page 153, which is the July 28, 1928 section, an article titled Fruits and Vegetables Shipped Long Distances.

    OK, it’s a 1928 article and changes will take place from then until the 1956/1957 AAR reports I gave numbers from earlier. Shipments from the West Coast to Chicago and onto the Eastern seaboard will be speeded up by days.

However I would think that eating habits would stay the same.

The following is transcribed directly from the article

     Some extracts from the bulletin are as follows: From a rail shipping standpoint, white potatoes stand first, apples second, grapes third, oranges forth, followed by lettuce, watermelons, peaches, cabbage, cantaloupes and onions.

     But from the standpoint of unloads in the 66 markets, the order is somewhat different. White potatoes take the lead, nearly one-fourth of the unloads in these markets being of this product. Next in line is grapes followed by oranges, apples, lettuce, cantaloupes, watermelons, onions, cabbage and tomatoes. These ten commodities represent over 80 percent of the combined unloads.

 

Here is the link: https://books.google.com/books?id=lZYlAAAAMAAJ&dq=American%20Bridge%20Company%20Turntable&pg=PA153#v=onepage&q&f=false

 

A very interesting chart is part of the article. Looking at the column of Citrus Fruits/Lemons stands one state alone in 1928, California. Whatever bar in whatever state in 1928, if the cocktail called for a lemon twist, that twist came from California. Other than prohibition was on.

Some carload numbers are given in the article.  All in all, an interesting read.


Some numbers from the AAR reports I found concerning potatoes:

First week of January 1956; 4000 carloads of potatoes are shipped.

January 20, 1956 - Potato shipments are strong.

February 20, 1956 - Potato shipments maintain a strong presence.

March 20, 1956 - Potato shipments steady. (Carload numbers?  Almost there.)

April 20, 1956 -   Late potato shipments in north central, PNW, states slowing, still strong from

     Maine and Idaho. Maine - 32,664 carloads for season and 40,139 from Idaho. Up to April 7th,

     175,856 carloads nationally.  Loading in Calif. will increase third week April when Kern and 

     Tulare County potatoes start shipping.

 

June 20, 1956 - Market demand for potatoes became strong during movements of the old potato 

      crops from Maine and Idaho, and continues strong for new potatoes loading from 

      California and Arizona.

 July 21, 1956 - Kern County, CA potato loading is drawing to a close. Phoenix, AZ potato loading

      district is quite heavy.         

 August 21, 1956 - Local home-grown produce is reducing the need for shipping from distant areas.

       Middle- West, Allegheny, and North Atlantic states have excellent growing conditions and

       local supplies are plentiful. (And so a good reason not to model this month I offer unless you

       like parked reefers.)

 September 20, 1956 - Summer potatoes are moving in some areas.

 October 25, 1956 Idaho loading of potatoes, apples, and onions are greater than 1200 carloads per

      week and increasing. Red River Valley potatoes (MN/ND) are at 1000 carloads a week and will

      be steady at that rate for some time. Most of Maine potatoes are being stored, there is some 

      movement in Sept., however that takes off in December lasting to April.

November 21, 1956 - Some Maine potatoes have been moving during Sept, Oct, and Nov, with   

     2,425 carloads moved by early November.

December 20, 1956 - Potato loading is now greater than 1500 carloads a week in Maine, has   

     peaked at 1200 carloads per week each in Idaho and the Red River Valley.

    (Or disregarding the originating states of Maine, Idaho, ND, MN, just short of 90 cars of spuds

     in each of the remaining 44 contiguous states, each week.) 

 

     OK, something to be aware of if you waybill model reefers – as mentioned in earlier posts by me, potatoes can also be classified as early, summer, and late potatoes. Late potatoes are the ones that store best. Maine, Red River Valley, and Idaho potatoes are all late season spuds, and are most likely to have been stored, then shipped by rail in this lists time frame.

     To circle back, Doug Harding pondered, “For each reefer of beef do I also need a reefer hauling potatoes? Another hauling fresh vegetables, and yet another hauling fruit.”

      As a start, I offer that comment cannot be dismissed when way billing cars.

      Or deciding a representative fleet of cars.

      By the way, these same AAR reports list Included in the reports were 53,786 carloads of Bananas originating at US ports in the 1st half of the 1956 year.   

                                    

                                                           Numbers to ponder -     Jim Dick        Roseville, MN

 


Re: FEC 17001 ventilated cars

Robert kirkham
 

Just wanted to say thanks to everyone who has forwarded drawings and photos of these cars.    Will remember to flag the parts once created.

 

If anyone has a close up of the end vent itself, that would make a difference, but at this point the rest of the part is coming along reasonably well.

 

Rob

 


Re: Dry Flow Tank Cars ?

Douglas Harding
 

Jim the M&StL leased two, but only one was actually placed in service, on 11-1-1936. Numbered 70001. I have a copy of the contract between GATC and M&StL. The contract was for 10 months. I don’t know if it was renewed. I do know Gene Green spent many years attempting to learn about this car. He never found a photo. A diagram of the inner workings of the car was published in the 1937 Car Builder’s Cyclopedia. I will send you a copy off list.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Sunday, January 28, 2018 10:29 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Dry Flow Tank Cars ?

 

 

  Sorry if this has been discussed here prior. I could not find anything in posts. 

While researching, this came up..from page 605 of a 1932 Railway Age is an article on General American Dry-Flo tank cars. Wondering if anyone has a sense of how many of these cars were built. Covered hoppers are still in the future a bit. 

   In the 50s, were these still running? 

 

 Has anyone ever produced a model (HO) of these? 

 

                             Thank you in advance.            Jim Dick  - St. Paul                                                                    

 


Dry Flow Tank Cars ?

np328
 

  Sorry if this has been discussed here prior. I could not find anything in posts. 

While researching, this came up..from page 605 of a 1932 Railway Age is an article on General American Dry-Flo tank cars. Wondering if anyone has a sense of how many of these cars were built. Covered hoppers are still in the future a bit. 

   In the 50s, were these still running? 

 Has anyone ever produced a model (HO) of these? 

                             Thank you in advance.            Jim Dick  - St. Paul                                                                    



Re: How Do You Store Your ACC?

A&Y Dave in MD
 

I store my bottles inside a large plastic pill bottle (90 day supply with non-childproof cap so it's easy to open). I put 1/2 inch of Drierite in bottom, then in goes the ACC bottle, then cap pill container. I carry that in my toolbox and store it on my workbench with no problems.

Sent from Dave Bott's iPad


Re: How Do You Store Your ACC?

frograbbit602
 

I use several ACC types: Zap thin (pink label) and gel (green label) which I keep in a large plastic pill bottle with cover. Inside the pill bottle drier packets fill the space around the two Zap bottles. Since I began using this method I have been able to use the entire bottle no matter what length of time to do so. I also use Loctite thin (red label) and thick (blue label) which just set on the work bench with no problem using the entire bottle from start to finish. Just as a side note: I find the Zap seems to set slower as it ages so to have it set as if a new bottle I place five drops of Zap in a water bottle cap and add a two or three drops of Loctite thin. The water bottle cap with this amount of ACC will last several hours on the workbench before setting up.
Lester Breuer


New mini-kit and another new part from Resin Car Works

Eric Hansmann
 

The Resin Car Works minions are keeping busy with two more new products. A mini-kit and another part are now available. Check out the latest blog post for more details@

http://blog.resincarworks.com/new-resin-car-works-products/

 

 

Eric Hansmann

RCW web guy

 

 


Re: Dates for Script and Brush Dixieland on NC&StL box cars

Bill Welch
 

NC&StL cars tended to be an Oxide version of BCR. Be aware the NC&StL cars all had Hutchins roofs.

Bill Welch


Re: How Do You Store Your ACC?

John Sykes III
 

Ditto here for Loctite.  I don't have to worry about storage, because I use it up too fast!

-- John


Re: How Do You Store Your ACC?

Lee Thwaits
 

Another vote for Loctite Super Glue!

Lee Thwaits


Dates for Script and Brush Dixieland on NC&StL box cars

John Barry
 





With the release of the the Accurail 36' Fowler Boxcars, including part 1159 decorated for NC&StL, I have a question as to correct paint & lettering for my modeled era of December 1944.  The data sheet produced by Ray Breyer found at http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/accurail_data_1150series.pdf shows photos of two versions of the car near my time frame:  XM27 NC&StL 15377 with AB brakes and a reweigh date of NE 4-45 with a Brush style? (slanted all cap san serif block letters) DIXIELAND and a Soapbar style NC&StL logo in rather worn paint next to XM28 NC&StL 16453 in much fresher paint with K brakes and a reweigh of NE 10-40 with a script Dixieland and octagonal Dixie Line logo.  

As there were 943 XM27 and 471 XM28 listed in the Jan 45 ORER, when did each of the schemes come into effect on the NC&StL?  The photos are B&W, but appear to be overall Box Car Red, including the roofs and trucks.  Can you confirm the colors?
 
John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 
Lovettsville, VA

707-490-9696 

PO Box 44736 
Washington, DC 20026-4736



Re: How Do You Store Your ACC?

Craig Zeni
 

On Jan 28, 2018, at 6:03 AM, STMFC@... wrote:

4a. How Do You Store Your ACC?
Posted by: thecitrusbelt@... thecitrusbelt
Date: Sat Jan 27, 2018 5:44 pm ((PST))




As most of you know, ACC ("super glue") is very sensitive to moisture. If stored in the open, even with the cap on, enough moisture will be drawn in to activate the ACC and harden it in the container. I've had this happen more than a few times, especially with the larger containers of ACC in gel form.



I've heard of modelers storing ACC in a sealed bag in the freezer compartment of a refrigerator as one way to prevent spoilage. I assume this works.



And I know some modelers just buy the very small tubes and assume they will harden before they can be completely used.



What methods do you use to store and preserve ACC?
I use the Cypox products and its bottle seems to seal extremely well. What I have I've been for over 18 months and it has not thickened or gone off at all. Not refrigerated or anything special....just sits in a plastic drawer that's translucent but out of direct hard light.


Craig Zeni
Cary NC

40341 - 40360 of 195395