Date   
Re: PRR X43B Trucks

Richard Townsend
 

According to the "typewritten list" at the site Ben teased us with, the X43B rode on 2D-F33 trucks, which were ASF Ride Control trucks.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Nelson Moyer npmoyer@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Sat, Mar 3, 2018 8:10 pm
Subject: RE: [STMFC] PRR X43B Trucks

 
Correction, the list went through X42, not X43b.
 
Nelson Moyer
 
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Saturday, March 03, 2018 9:47 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] PRR X43B Trucks
 
 
Nelson Moyer asked:
"I built a Branchline Blueprint kit lettered for a PRR X43B boxcar. The PRR Freight Car Truck Chart stops at X42. What trucks were used on X43B cars?"
 
Not sure which revision you are consulting - be advised this document is updated periodically, and there are multiple revisions posted at Rob Schoenberg's website.  I'm not going to spoonfeed you the answer - I leave it to you to do the homework.
 
 
Ben Hom
 
 
 

Re: PRR X43B Trucks

Nelson Moyer
 

Correction, the list went through X42, not X43b.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Saturday, March 03, 2018 9:47 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] PRR X43B Trucks

 

 

Nelson Moyer asked:

"I built a Branchline Blueprint kit lettered for a PRR X43B boxcar. The PRR Freight Car Truck Chart stops at X42. What trucks were used on X43B cars?"

 

Not sure which revision you are consulting - be advised this document is updated periodically, and there are multiple revisions posted at Rob Schoenberg's website.  I'm not going to spoonfeed you the answer - I leave it to you to do the homework.

 

 

Ben Hom

 

 

 

Re: PRR X43B Trucks

Nelson Moyer
 

Ben,

 

I clicked on every freight car truck link on the link below, and the newest class listed was X41b. The list I consulted went through X43b, so my list is the newest one I’ve seen yet. Any more ideas?

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Saturday, March 03, 2018 9:47 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] PRR X43B Trucks

 

 

Nelson Moyer asked:

"I built a Branchline Blueprint kit lettered for a PRR X43B boxcar. The PRR Freight Car Truck Chart stops at X42. What trucks were used on X43B cars?"

 

Not sure which revision you are consulting - be advised this document is updated periodically, and there are multiple revisions posted at Rob Schoenberg's website.  I'm not going to spoonfeed you the answer - I leave it to you to do the homework.

 

 

Ben Hom

 

 

 

Re: PRR X43B Trucks

Benjamin Hom
 

Nelson Moyer asked:
"I built a Branchline Blueprint kit lettered for a PRR X43B boxcar. The PRR Freight Car Truck Chart stops at X42. What trucks were used on X43B cars?"

Not sure which revision you are consulting - be advised this document is updated periodically, and there are multiple revisions posted at Rob Schoenberg's website.  I'm not going to spoonfeed you the answer - I leave it to you to do the homework.


Ben Hom



PRR X43B Trucks

Nelson Moyer
 

I built a Branchline Blueprint kit lettered for a PRR X43B boxcar. The PRR Freight Car Truck Chart stops at X42. What trucks were used on X43B cars?

 

Nelson Moyer

Duluth, South Shore And Atlantic Box Car

frograbbit602
 

I have completed a Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic Box Car, DSS&A 17077, a Resin Car Works kit.   I have posted photos and writeup including part details, paint, etc. on my blog I started to share photos and writeup on Freight Cars, etc. of modeling projects on my Minneapolis & Northland Railroad Company.   If you would like to take a look please do at the following:


Lester Breuer


Re: Unicel Freight Cars

Richard Townsend
 

Ambroid did. They're often seen on ebay.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Sat, Mar 3, 2018 4:52 pm
Subject: [STMFC] Unicel Freight Cars

 
Diagram:
 
 
Pressed Steel Car Company Photos, circa 1950:
 
 
 
This article indicates they were not a commercial success:
 
 
Did anyone ever produce a kit for these cars?
 
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA

Re: British American Tank Car Photos

Robert kirkham
 

Reading further I see the collection is linked to Ian’s site,  so they are probably the same photos.  It’s an invaluable collection.

 

Rob

 

On 3/3/18 1:25 PM, thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

This is a link to the BAOX tank car photos from the

T.A. Watson collection:

 

http://www.nakina.net/galleries/BAOX/

 

Use the slider to scroll down to see the photos.

 

The images are not very large, however.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

 



 



 




Re: British American Tank Car Photos

Robert kirkham
 

Black cat has decals for the earlier and later BA cars, with service lives  as follows:

http://www.blackcatdecals.com/product/baox358-h-british-american-tank-car-bow-tie-1927-1947/ Bow Tie 1927-1947

http://www.blackcatdecals.com/product/baox833-british-american-tank-car/ Roundel 1947 – 1967.  (which better fits my memory of when Gulf Oil bought them.)

 

Marc Smith is a photo vendor and has some nice large colour images, which sometimes come up on Ebay.

Rob  

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Saturday, March 3, 2018 4:51 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] British American Tank Car Photos

 




Sorry – Should have read Ian’s page first:– he says: In 4/1960 their cars were transferred to CGTX listings and quickly renumbered to CGTX numbers (most apparently in the CGTX 2100-2978 series), with both BAOX and FOKX reporting marks being eliminated in 4/1961.

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Saturday, March 3, 2018 11:54 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] British American Tank Car Photos

 



Bob and Friends,

That's an interesting collection of tank cars. It isn't clear to me when the BAOX cars were photographed. Is that large herald in our time period? That said, some of the cars have Andrews and even archbar trucks, so they appear to have been shot over some period of time.

According to my 1958 ORER, British American Oil Company, Limited or BAOX operated 422 cars at this time. Fidelity Oil Company was a subsidiary that had 28 cars operating under the FOKX marks. Nice to see a couple of the FOKX cars represented here. Also represented are cars from Toronto Pipe Line Company, which operated 152 cars under the TBAX reporting marks. From the herald on on TBAX 120, this company was acquired by British American, though perhaps not in our time frame. In my ORER there does not appear to be a connection. There is also one British American car shown with Canadian General Transit Company or CGTX marks.

Interestingly, BAOX 976-995 are listed as having their home point as Milton, PA., despite being operated by a Canadian company.

The selection also includes cars from John H. Grace Company marked GRYX. My ORER has a listing for GRYX, but the "No. of Cars" columns for all their cars are empty, suggesting they had been sold, or were just being acquired.

Lots of mysteries here.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff 
🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿

On 3/3/18 1:25 PM, thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

This is a link to the BAOX tank car photos from the

T.A. Watson collection:

 

http://www.nakina.net/galleries/BAOX/

 

Use the slider to scroll down to see the photos.

 

The images are not very large, however.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

 




 




Unicel Freight Cars

thecitrusbelt@...
 

Diagram:

 

http://explore.chicagocollections.org/image/artic/85/9883d2b/

 

Pressed Steel Car Company Photos, circa 1950:

 

http://explore.chicagocollections.org/image/artic/85/f18t606/

 

http://explore.chicagocollections.org/image/artic/85/kk95450/

 

This article indicates they were not a commercial success:

 

http://bertrandgoldberg.org/projects/unicel-prefab-freight-cars/

 

Did anyone ever produce a kit for these cars?

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Re: British American Tank Car Photos

Robert kirkham
 

Sorry – Should have read Ian’s page first:– he says: In 4/1960 their cars were transferred to CGTX listings and quickly renumbered to CGTX numbers (most apparently in the CGTX 2100-2978 series), with both BAOX and FOKX reporting marks being eliminated in 4/1961.

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Saturday, March 3, 2018 11:54 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] British American Tank Car Photos

 



Bob and Friends,

That's an interesting collection of tank cars. It isn't clear to me when the BAOX cars were photographed. Is that large herald in our time period? That said, some of the cars have Andrews and even archbar trucks, so they appear to have been shot over some period of time.

According to my 1958 ORER, British American Oil Company, Limited or BAOX operated 422 cars at this time. Fidelity Oil Company was a subsidiary that had 28 cars operating under the FOKX marks. Nice to see a couple of the FOKX cars represented here. Also represented are cars from Toronto Pipe Line Company, which operated 152 cars under the TBAX reporting marks. From the herald on on TBAX 120, this company was acquired by British American, though perhaps not in our time frame. In my ORER there does not appear to be a connection. There is also one British American car shown with Canadian General Transit Company or CGTX marks.

Interestingly, BAOX 976-995 are listed as having their home point as Milton, PA., despite being operated by a Canadian company.

The selection also includes cars from John H. Grace Company marked GRYX. My ORER has a listing for GRYX, but the "No. of Cars" columns for all their cars are empty, suggesting they had been sold, or were just being acquired.

Lots of mysteries here.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff 
🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿

On 3/3/18 1:25 PM, thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

This is a link to the BAOX tank car photos from the

T.A. Watson collection:

 

http://www.nakina.net/galleries/BAOX/

 

Use the slider to scroll down to see the photos.

 

The images are not very large, however.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

 





Re: British American Tank Car Photos

Robert kirkham
 

Ian Cranstone’s index http://www.nakina.net/private/baox.html  covers the history in detail, as he has built the reference on the basis of a lot of ORERs etc.  So it may be possible to answer more of those questions.  I’m going to spend a little time trying to determine if the links are to the same photos.  I recall B/A being bought out by Gulf in the 1960’s.  Ian’s site notes many series re-stenciled into CGTX around 1960-61.   So I’d think most BA logo paint is the lists era.

  

 

Rob

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Saturday, March 3, 2018 11:54 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] British American Tank Car Photos

 



Bob and Friends,

That's an interesting collection of tank cars. It isn't clear to me when the BAOX cars were photographed. Is that large herald in our time period? That said, some of the cars have Andrews and even archbar trucks, so they appear to have been shot over some period of time.

According to my 1958 ORER, British American Oil Company, Limited or BAOX operated 422 cars at this time. Fidelity Oil Company was a subsidiary that had 28 cars operating under the FOKX marks. Nice to see a couple of the FOKX cars represented here. Also represented are cars from Toronto Pipe Line Company, which operated 152 cars under the TBAX reporting marks. From the herald on on TBAX 120, this company was acquired by British American, though perhaps not in our time frame. In my ORER there does not appear to be a connection. There is also one British American car shown with Canadian General Transit Company or CGTX marks.

Interestingly, BAOX 976-995 are listed as having their home point as Milton, PA., despite being operated by a Canadian company.

The selection also includes cars from John H. Grace Company marked GRYX. My ORER has a listing for GRYX, but the "No. of Cars" columns for all their cars are empty, suggesting they had been sold, or were just being acquired.

Lots of mysteries here.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff 
🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿

On 3/3/18 1:25 PM, thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

This is a link to the BAOX tank car photos from the

T.A. Watson collection:

 

http://www.nakina.net/galleries/BAOX/

 

Use the slider to scroll down to see the photos.

 

The images are not very large, however.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

 





Re: Unusual Work Car

Charlie Vlk
 

All-
The car is actually an ex-CB&Q “cream car” (milk car) used to transfer wheel sets back and forth between the 14th Street coach yard and the shops at Aurora. Later a baggage car was modified the same way when the cream car wore out.
The wheel car would be tacked on to the rear of a dinky (commuter train) to and from Aurora. Wheels were turned and roller bearings renewed / replaced at the shops for the coach yard forces to swap out on Intercity and commuter stock.
Charlie Vlk

Unusual Work Car

thecitrusbelt@...
 

Photo on this link:

 

http://explore.chicagocollections.org/image/newberry/83/k35mk2d/

 

Caption: "Workers loading wheels onto railroad car, 14th Street passenger yards, Chicago, May 1948"

 

The car looks like a converted express reefer.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Re: British American Tank Car Photos

Garth Groff or Sally Sanford <sarahsan@...>
 

Bob and Friends,

That's an interesting collection of tank cars. It isn't clear to me when the BAOX cars were photographed. Is that large herald in our time period? That said, some of the cars have Andrews and even archbar trucks, so they appear to have been shot over some period of time.

According to my 1958 ORER, British American Oil Company, Limited or BAOX operated 422 cars at this time. Fidelity Oil Company was a subsidiary that had 28 cars operating under the FOKX marks. Nice to see a couple of the FOKX cars represented here.
Also represented are cars from Toronto Pipe Line Company, which operated 152 cars under the TBAX reporting marks. From the herald on on TBAX 120, this company was acquired by British American, though perhaps not in our time frame. In my ORER there does not appear to be a connection. There is also one British American car shown with Canadian General Transit Company or CGTX marks.

Interestingly, BAOX 976-995 are listed as having their home point as Milton, PA., despite being operated by a Canadian company.

The selection also includes cars from John H. Grace Company marked GRYX. My ORER has a listing for GRYX, but the "No. of Cars" columns for all their cars are empty, suggesting they had been sold, or were just being acquired.

Lots of mysteries here.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿


On 3/3/18 1:25 PM, thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] wrote:
 

This is a link to the BAOX tank car photos from the

T.A. Watson collection:


http://www.nakina.net/galleries/BAOX/

 

Use the slider to scroll down to see the photos.

 

The images are not very large, however.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA



British American Tank Car Photos

thecitrusbelt@...
 

This is a link to the BAOX tank car photos from the

T.A. Watson collection:


http://www.nakina.net/galleries/BAOX/

 

Use the slider to scroll down to see the photos.

 

The images are not very large, however.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Steel Strapping For Lumber Loads

Dennis Storzek
 

---In STMFC@..., <timboconnor@...> wrote :

Definitely used for pipe loads in the 1940's - although not wrapped around
the pipes as it would be later. Load photos show upright lumber (large, square)
on either side of the load and strapping connecting the timbers, over the
load. In the photos the pipes are all at different endpoints so clearly they
can shift longitudinally. I think steel wire was used at the time as well.

Tim
=============================

All the AAR loading diagrams from the WWII era and before call for steel wire to tie the tops of the stakes together to squeeze the load. The advantages of wire:

No tool is needed to make the splice, just twist the ends together.
No tool is needed to tighten it, just catch the end of a bar or stick between the wires and swing it around, the wires get shorter as they twist together.

As an aside, back in the fifties large nail boxes (50 pounds) came bound with wire, rather than strapping, and the wire had been tightened by twisting.

The disadvantages of strapping, that slowed it's adoption:

A special tool is needed to tighten the strap around the load.
A special tool is needed to crimp the splice, and there was some question how well the splice would hold, or if it wold slip over time.

As more experience was gained with strapping, it became accepted  as equal to or better than heavy wire.

Dennis Storzek

Re: CB&Q XM-25

jdcellarmod@...
 

Hi Jim,

Yes, the PDS and instructions will help. The Speedwitch kit was my first choice. I have looked at Ted's pictures along with his Essential Freight Cars article.

Thanks, Jeff Drennan

On March 1, 2018 at 8:53 PM "Jim Hayes jimhayes97225@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

I have the PDS and instructions for Sunshine's XM-25 kit. No measurements but they might be helpful. Just ask.
Speedwitch also sold an XM25. They're out of stock but have several nice pictures on their website.

Jim

On Thu, Mar 1, 2018 at 3:45 PM, jdcellarmod@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Hi all,


I am looking for a drawing of this boxcar. I have the BRHS freight car data sheet. This gives me some dimensions but not everything I need as I am scratchbuilding/bashing this car. Any help would be appreciated. 


Thanks, Jeff Drennan



 

 

Re: Steel Strapping For Lumber Loads

Tim O'Connor
 


Definitely used for pipe loads in the 1940's - although not wrapped around
the pipes as it would be later. Load photos show upright lumber (large, square)
on either side of the load and strapping connecting the timbers, over the
load. In the photos the pipes are all at different endpoints so clearly they
can shift longitudinally. I think steel wire was used at the time as well.
When wire is in contact with the load, there is often something like heavy
cardboard or some tough material between the wire and the load. I've seen that
often on wallboard loads.

Chart Pak used to be available in 1/64" size - that is the size I use.

Tim


In the range of 1945 to 1950, where would steel strapping have been used?
Gondola loads perhaps? Machinery loads?
Chuck Peck

Up until the late 1950s or early 1960s lumber was primarily loaded and unloaded into boxcars by hand.�  Many boxcars had a small door high up on the "A" end of the car specifically for this reason.

Just a note.�  If you are interested in simulating steel banded loads, ChartPak Chart Tape is perfect for this.�  There are other brands of "Art Tape" out there.�  Hobby Lobby caries a brand called HeadLine.�  My only gripe with it is that it is a crepe-style to make bends, etc. and does not appear glossy like steel banding.�  Chart Tape is vinyl, so it bends but also appears glossy - like real steel banding.�  It was available through Staples and/or Office Depot (may not be in stores but is online) the last time I checked.�  It is available in 1/32", 1/16" & 1/8" widths (maybe more),�  but those 3 work great for HO.�  Used to be about a buck and a half a roll but is now more like two and a half bucks a roll.

-- John

Re: Steel Strapping For Lumber Loads

Charles Peck
 

In the range of 1945 to 1950, where would steel strapping have been used?
Gondola loads perhaps? Machinery loads?
Chuck Peck

On Fri, Mar 2, 2018 at 7:06 PM, johnsykesiii@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Up until the late 1950s or early 1960s lumber was primarily loaded and unloaded into boxcars by hand.  Many boxcars had a small door high up on the "A" end of the car specifically for this reason.


Just a note.  If you are interested in simulating steel banded loads, ChartPak Chart Tape is perfect for this.  There are other brands of "Art Tape" out there.  Hobby Lobby caries a brand called HeadLine.  My only gripe with it is that it is a crepe-style to make bends, etc. and does not appear glossy like steel banding.  Chart Tape is vinyl, so it bends but also appears glossy - like real steel banding.  It was available through Staples and/or Office Depot (may not be in stores but is online) the last time I checked.  It is available in 1/32", 1/16" & 1/8" widths (maybe more),  but those 3 work great for HO.  Used to be about a buck and a half a roll but is now more like two and a half bucks a roll.

-- John