Date   

Re: Another Pickle Car (Photo)

Gene Deimling
 

The museum in Green Bay, Wisconsin has a pickle car preserved.

Gene Deimling


Another Pickle Car (Photo)

thecitrusbelt@...
 

Loading cucumbers:

 

https://tinyurl.com/y96nrcmk

 

Have any of these open side-style (correct terminology?) pickle cars been preserved at a museum?

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: 1927 ORER

Richard Townsend
 

Nothing in the ORERs from 1/38, 1/43, 4/52, 7/56, or 1/58. No LINX or Lincoln Oil.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: 'Steve and Barb Hile' shile@... [STMFC] To: STMFC
Sent: Fri, Mar 9, 2018 8:24 pm
Subject: [STMFC] 1927 ORER

 
I am trying to trace some Lincoln Oil Refining Company tank cars that were purchased by UTLX in 1927.  I don't see Lincoln, or its reporting marks LINX in the October 1926 ORER and it doesn't show in 1930, either.
 
I would appreciate if anyone could share any Lincoln Oil Refining ORER info from any time in 1927 or later.  Lincoln was located in Robinson, Illinois and was a predecessor of Marathon, which still operates a refinery there.
 
Thanks in advance.
 
Steve Hile


1927 ORER

Steve and Barb Hile
 

I am trying to trace some Lincoln Oil Refining Company tank cars that were purchased by UTLX in 1927.  I don't see Lincoln, or its reporting marks LINX in the October 1926 ORER and it doesn't show in 1930, either.
 
I would appreciate if anyone could share any Lincoln Oil Refining ORER info from any time in 1927 or later.  Lincoln was located in Robinson, Illinois and was a predecessor of Marathon, which still operates a refinery there.
 
Thanks in advance.
 
Steve Hile


Re: Salt Tank Cars

Schuyler Larrabee
 

These cars are quite interesting. Note the lengthy platforms at the ends of the cars.



I agree, Bruce, wood tanks.



Schuyler



From: STMFC@... <STMFC@...>
Sent: Friday, March 09, 2018 12:46 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Salt Tank Cars





Bob,



I’m not sure if you’re trying to say that these are have steel tanks. If you are then I believe that you are incorrect. If you examine the photograph very carefully, it is clear that the tanks are wood. Thus, they are (nearly) identical to the vinegar tank cars and that makes a lot of sense. I also note that they appear to be be style with 2 tanks per car.



Regards

Bruce



Bruce F. Smith

Auburn, AL

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."









On Mar 9, 2018, at 10:31 AM, thecitrusbelt@... <mailto:thecitrusbelt@...> [STMFC] <STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC@...> > wrote:





This 1926 builder's photo is from the Indiana Historical Society website:

<http://images.indianahistory.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p16797coll21/id/94/rec/616> http://images.indianahistory.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p16797coll21/id/94/rec/616

I imagine these cars carried various salt compounds. To my eye they look a bit like steel versions of vinegar tank cars with wooden tanks.

What else is known about such cars?

Bob Chaparro


Re: Salt Tank Cars

Ted Schnepf
 

Hello,

Are these cars longer than 40 foot?  Maybe the camera angle makes the cars look long.  What are the reporting marks?

Was salt mined in the Cincinnati area?

ted


At 11:45 AM 3/9/2018, you wrote:


Bob,

I’m not sure if you’re trying to say that these are have steel tanks. If you are then I believe that you are incorrect.  If you examine the photograph very carefully, it is clear that the tanks are wood.  Thus, they are (nearly) identical to the vinegar tank cars and that makes a lot of sense.  I also note that they appear to be be style with 2 tanks per car.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith           

Auburn, AL
"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."




On Mar 9, 2018, at 10:31 AM, thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

This 1926 builder's photo is from the Indiana Historical Society website:
http://images.indianahistory.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p16797coll21/id/94/rec/616
I imagine these cars carried various salt compounds. To my eye they look a bit like steel versions of vinegar tank cars with wooden tanks.
What else is known about such cars?
Bob Chaparro


Rails Unlimited
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Re: USRA was Ralston-Purina Ventilated Box Car (Reefer)

Ted Culotta
 

It’s a Petroleum Iron Works car. There weren’t many. I’m getting on a plane, but can post additional commentary tomorrow when i’m back home.

Cheers


Re: USRA was Ralston-Purina Ventilated Box Car (Reefer)

brianleppert@att.net
 

The USRA tank design allowed for either construction.  USRA drawings were published in the 1919 Car Builders' Dictionary and Cyclopedia and reprinted in Train Shed Cyclopedia No. 9.

I posted the photo link again because my first post lost the link to Tim's post.

Brian Leppert
Carson City


---In STMFC@..., <timboconnor@...> wrote :


I thought I'd already posted that... In any case, the tank is not a 4-course
(horizontal courses) like the USRA design.



Borascu Covered Hopper Car

thecitrusbelt@...
 

Photo taken in August 1956. This is Baltimore & Ohio Train No. 102 eastbound at West Broad Street, Columbus, Ohio:

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/38641689@N05/13222580804/in/album-72157642498545434/

 

I've seen covered hopper cars with "Borax" lettering. This one is marked for "Borascu", a product of Pacific Coast Borax Company. Borascu is a sodium borate ore weed control chemical.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: USRA was Ralston-Purina Ventilated Box Car (Reefer)

Tim O'Connor
 


I thought I'd already posted that... In any case, the tank is not a 4-course
(horizontal courses) like the USRA design.



March Alma branch op session.

Jared Harper
 

I am having an op session on my railroad on the 31st of March and need one more operator.

Jared Harper 
420 Woodward Way
Athens, GA 30606
706-543-8821


Re: Salt Tank Cars (They Are Wood Tanks)

thecitrusbelt@...
 

Yes, you are absolutely correct. After I enlarged the photo to its maximum I could just see the lines between the boards.


Thanks for correcting this.


Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: USRA was Ralston-Purina Ventilated Box Car (Reefer)

brianleppert@att.net
 


Re: the brake wheel staff on this CCC&StL gon is too long

John Hagen <sprinthag@...>
 

I enlarged the brake wheel area, fiddled with brightness/contrast and ended up with this.

I am also of the opinion the long object above the brake shaft is some sort of tool, possibly a broom handle?

Anyway it is not part of the brake shaft.

Find photo at

https://tinyurl.com/ya5mz6h9



John Hagen



















From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Friday, March 09, 2018 11:15 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: the brake wheel staff on this CCC&StL gon is too long





That was my thought, too.

Richard Townsend

Lincoln City, OR



-----Original Message-----
From: jack.f.mullen@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
To: STMFC <STMFC@...>
Sent: Fri, Mar 9, 2018 9:05 am
Subject: [STMFC] Re: the brake wheel staff on this CCC&StL gon is too long



OK, it's my turn to be the skeptic. I don't believe this is what it looks like.



The Safety Appliance act specifically requires:

(v) Brake shaft shall be arranged with a square fit at its upper end to secure

the hand-brake wheel; said square fit shall be not less than seven-eighths

of an inch square. Square-fit taper, nominally 2 in 12 inches. (See plate A.)

So the hypothesized sliding brake wheel would be a safety appliance defect.





How do you secure a sliding brake wheel to a ROUND shaft anyway?



What's the use of dropping the wheel, if the shaft still projects to it's original height.?





Drop wheels as commonly used on flats have the wheel secured to the drop shaft, in compliance with the Act, and a square shaft that slides through the lower mechanisim .





If you zoom in very closely, I think you can see that the nut securing the wheel is in front of the supposed staff extension, which seems to be offset very slightly to the right.





Occam's Razor sez this is a broom handle or some such, perhaps used as a brake club, which was left sticking up from the coal, next to the brakewheel, and the photo happened to catch it at the right angle to create a nice illusion.





Jack Mullen


Re: the brake wheel staff on this CCC&StL gon is too long

Douglas Harding
 

Charlie your answer would be plausible, except for two reasons:

1)            The car has a fixed end.

2)            The brake gear is mounted on the first corrugation of the end, not on the end beam.

 

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Friday, March 9, 2018 9:30 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] the brake wheel staff on this CCC&StL gon is too long

 

 

Klaus

The wheel can slide up and down the staff which in turn can be folded to rest on the end beam.  You can see the articulated joint at the base.

I guess that the gondola is convertible for use as a flat which is the normal application for this device

Charlie Vlk


On Mar 9, 2018, at 8:35 AM, 'Claus Schlund' claus@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Hi List Members,

 

Note how the brake wheel staff on this CCC&StL gon is too long – it extends maybe a foot or more above the brake 

 

Had anyone ever modeled that? I wonder how long it would take before anyone in your operating crew noticed!?!

 

 

Claus Schlund

 


USRA was Ralston-Purina Ventilated Box Car (Reefer)

brianleppert@att.net
 

Notice this tank car sits on a USRA designed underframe.  Could that tank also match USRA drawings?

Brian Leppert
Carson City, NV


Re: Salt Tank Cars

Bruce Smith
 

Bob,

I’m not sure if you’re trying to say that these are have steel tanks. If you are then I believe that you are incorrect.  If you examine the photograph very carefully, it is clear that the tanks are wood.  Thus, they are (nearly) identical to the vinegar tank cars and that makes a lot of sense.  I also note that they appear to be be style with 2 tanks per car.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."




On Mar 9, 2018, at 10:31 AM, thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

This 1926 builder's photo is from the Indiana Historical Society website:
I imagine these cars carried various salt compounds. To my eye they look a bit like steel versions of vinegar tank cars with wooden tanks.
What else is known about such cars?
Bob Chaparro


Re: the brake wheel staff on this CCC&StL gon is too long

Charlie Vlk
 

Tom-

I agree with you….the shadow of the brake wheel is almost parallel to the axis of the car and the shadow of the “too tall brake staff” should be visible aft of the brake wheel on the coal.  It is not, suggesting that the rod is actually stuck in the coal load above the CC&StL stencil.

Charlie Vlk

 

One other possibility is that what appears to be the upper portion of the rod is actually a rod embedded in the pile of coal against and inside the gondola end and the angle of the photo made it appear as an extension of the brake shaft. It seemed strange to me that this extension is above the nut and a different diameter than the shaft. .

 

Tom Hayden


Re: the brake wheel staff on this CCC&StL gon is too long

Benjamin Hom
 


As for car identification, the car number is illegible but the details mostly match CCC&StL 66900-67999, Lot 258-G built 1910 by AC&F.  The major difference is the car in the photo had heap shields, which the clearance diagram and builder's photo of cars in the same lot built for Michigan Central lack.


Ben Hom


Re: the brake wheel staff on this CCC&StL gon is too long

Richard Townsend
 

That was my thought, too.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: jack.f.mullen@... [STMFC] To: STMFC
Sent: Fri, Mar 9, 2018 9:05 am
Subject: [STMFC] Re: the brake wheel staff on this CCC&StL gon is too long

 
OK, it's my turn to be the skeptic. I don't believe this is what it looks like.

The Safety Appliance act specifically requires:
     (v) Brake shaft shall be arranged with a square fit at its upper end to secure
  the hand-brake wheel; said square fit shall be not less than seven-eighths
  of an inch square. Square-fit taper, nominally 2 in 12 inches. (See plate A.)
So the hypothesized sliding brake wheel would be a safety appliance defect.

How do you secure a sliding brake wheel to a ROUND shaft anyway? 

What's the use of dropping the wheel, if the shaft still projects to it's original height.?  

Drop  wheels as commonly used on flats have the wheel secured to the drop shaft, in compliance with the Act, and a square shaft that slides through the lower mechanisim .

If you zoom in very closely, I think you can see that the nut securing the wheel is in front of the supposed staff extension, which seems to be offset very slightly to the right.

Occam's Razor sez this is a broom handle or some such, perhaps used as a brake club, which was left sticking up from the coal, next to the brakewheel, and the photo happened to catch it at the right angle to create a nice illusion.  

Jack Mullen