Date   

Re: class of this ATSF box car?

charles slater
 

The underframes by the late 1940's and early 1950's  were rusting out, and like most of the 50 foot Fe-class cars received new bolsters, end sills and draft gear pockets. (see page 58 of the SFRH&MS book Vol. 3 "Furniture and Automobile Box Cars") The small "I" beam tab was only on the AS rebuilt version of these cars.

Charlie Slater 


Sent from Outlook




From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Eric Lombard <elombard@...>
Sent: Thursday, May 10, 2018 11:15 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] class of this ATSF box car?
 
Charlie, et al, that other classes received the "tabs" is great to know. Scratch one possible spotting feature! And I note in the Fe-15 photo you included that the side sill reinforcement is of the long variety extending a side panel's width beyond the right door opening. Scratch a second spotting feature. And I have received a couple of Fe-19 photos without the "tabs" as well. Scratch a third potential spotting feature. It would seem, as you say, that the tabs were added to members of all classes with advancing age. By 1975 the last few Fe-19s in service had underfames between 60 and 64 years old. Come to think of it when I reached into that age bracket I was thinking  "tabs", might be a help, too.

The leaves the formation of the corner between the end and side plates. Fe-15 and Fe-19 have the continuous angle riveted to both the side and end. My suggestion would be that is because of their greater inside width at 9-5 making the reused end-stampings too short to wrap around to the side as in the Fe-5 inside 9-2. Sure would like to see a photo of an Fe-12. At inside width 10-3 it is hard to predict the structure of the corner joint.

Eric


Re: ATSF Fe-U 50' car Whose model is this??

charles slater
 

The Fe-U does not have the massive underframe. (see photo) They were also not painted off white but the builders photo was for better visibility of the construction. All the cars were delivered in the normal mineral brown with white lettering. See photos.

Charlie Slater


Sent from Outlook




From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>
Sent: Thursday, May 10, 2018 10:12 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] ATSF Fe-U 50' car Whose model is this??
 

Steve I had exactly the same thought. And wouldn't a Santa Fe auto box of
that era have a massive fishbelly underframe?



Could it be scratch built or kit bashed?  The underframe appears to be Athearn, with the snap on coupler covers.  The ends look like the old stamped metal ones.  The hat section framing and sides look like wood shapes and sheets.  I remember the wrap around metal roof ribs, too.
 
Steve Hile


From: bill woelfel via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, May 10, 2018 9:42 AM
To: RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] ATSF Fe-U 50' car Whose model is this??

Sorry, forgot the link.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/332639060495


Re: class of this ATSF box car?

Eric Lombard
 

Charlie, et al, that other classes received the "tabs" is great to know. Scratch one possible spotting feature! And I note in the Fe-15 photo you included that the side sill reinforcement is of the long variety extending a side panel's width beyond the right door opening. Scratch a second spotting feature. And I have received a couple of Fe-19 photos without the "tabs" as well. Scratch a third potential spotting feature. It would seem, as you say, that the tabs were added to members of all classes with advancing age. By 1975 the last few Fe-19s in service had underfames between 60 and 64 years old. Come to think of it when I reached into that age bracket I was thinking  "tabs", might be a help, too.

The leaves the formation of the corner between the end and side plates. Fe-15 and Fe-19 have the continuous angle riveted to both the side and end. My suggestion would be that is because of their greater inside width at 9-5 making the reused end-stampings too short to wrap around to the side as in the Fe-5 inside 9-2. Sure would like to see a photo of an Fe-12. At inside width 10-3 it is hard to predict the structure of the corner joint.

Eric


Re: class of this ATSF box car?

charles slater
 

The Santa Fe USUALLY but not always just change the first letter to a "W", however sometimes they were simply marked as "We" and box cars as "Wx" sometimes they were mismarked as coming from the wrong class. 
Charlie Slater


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From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 9, 2018 5:58 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] class of this ATSF box car?
 
Eric,

I then suppose the car below is a former Fe-19. The class We-19 almost seems too easy. Photo taken in South Los Angeles, March 1975, complete with an insouciant pigeon on the roof (at extreme left).

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿



On 5/9/18 8:24 PM, Eric Lombard wrote:
Tim and Charlie... and everyone else who might have an interest:

Observations and thoughts...
In my original response(s) I did not consider the the other classes because the physical features of the car indicated Fe-19 to me.
1. The cars get bigger with time:
  1. Fe-5 inside width 9-2, inside height 10-4
  2. Fe-12 inside width 9-3, inside height 10-5
  3. Fe-15 inside width 9-5, inside height 10-5
  4. Fe-19 inside width 9-5, inside height 10-6
2. Some physical details change with time:
  1. Fe-5: at the corners the end plates wrap around and are riveted to the side plates as is seen in early steel cars, the ends of the body bolsters (or bolster extensions?) appear as an I-beam, the side sill reinforcement is confined to little more than the width of the door opening
  2. Fe-12: Photo needed!! 
  3. Fe-15: at the corners the end and side plates are covered by an angle riveted to both, the ends of the body bolsters appear as an I-beam, the side sill reinforcement is confined to little more than the width of the door opening.
  4. Fe-19: at the corners the end and side plates are covered by an angle riveted to both, the ends of the body bolsters are covered by a large channel "tab", the side sill reinforcement extends a side panel width beyond the outer edge of the main door (though I have seen one photo of an early member of the series with the short reinforcement).
The features of the car in question is identical to #4, a Fe-19 as is the car nee #5792 in the Arizona Ry Museum. 

The end features of the cars are apparently NOT class specific - at least that anyone has been able to determine. Rather mixes of "reverse" Dreadnaught and reverse Murphy panels and blank sheets are used in all classes (and in 50-6 cars being rebuilt at the same time). In both cases the two ends of the car may be different.

Some of the cars were renumbered:
Fe-05  63000-63254 RENO 4400-4648  begin 1956
Fe-12  63651-63750 RENO 5100-5199  begin 1953
Fe-15  63255-63504 19 RENO 6360-6378 1943, IH 12-4, end doors, airplane, RENO back 1945-6 to original height
20 RENO 6670-6689  1944, XAP airplane parts, RENO back 1945-6
All remaining cars with end doors  RENO to 6700-6723  1949
Fe-19  5200-5599  5 RENO to 6550-6554? 1957 but off roster 1-1958

Photos of Fe-12s in original or renumbered series are probably rare. There were only 100. None of the usual on-line sites have one, nor any publication I have examined. If someone out there has one I would love to have a peak at it!

Thanks entertaining my thoughts on this!

Eric



Re: class of this ATSF box car?

charles slater
 

The Fe-5 and 15 also received those large channel side sill tabs in later years, as did the Fe-19.

Charlie


Sent from Outlook




From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Eric Lombard <elombard@...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 9, 2018 5:24 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] class of this ATSF box car?
 
Tim and Charlie... and everyone else who might have an interest:

Observations and thoughts...
In my original response(s) I did not consider the the other classes because the physical features of the car indicated Fe-19 to me.
1. The cars get bigger with time:
  1. Fe-5 inside width 9-2, inside height 10-4
  2. Fe-12 inside width 9-3, inside height 10-5
  3. Fe-15 inside width 9-5, inside height 10-5
  4. Fe-19 inside width 9-5, inside height 10-6
2. Some physical details change with time:
  1. Fe-5: at the corners the end plates wrap around and are riveted to the side plates as is seen in early steel cars, the ends of the body bolsters (or bolster extensions?) appear as an I-beam, the side sill reinforcement is confined to little more than the width of the door opening
  2. Fe-12: Photo needed!! 
  3. Fe-15: at the corners the end and side plates are covered by an angle riveted to both, the ends of the body bolsters appear as an I-beam, the side sill reinforcement is confined to little more than the width of the door opening.
  4. Fe-19: at the corners the end and side plates are covered by an angle riveted to both, the ends of the body bolsters are covered by a large channel "tab", the side sill reinforcement extends a side panel width beyond the outer edge of the main door (though I have seen one photo of an early member of the series with the short reinforcement).
The features of the car in question is identical to #4, a Fe-19 as is the car nee #5792 in the Arizona Ry Museum. 

The end features of the cars are apparently NOT class specific - at least that anyone has been able to determine. Rather mixes of "reverse" Dreadnaught and reverse Murphy panels and blank sheets are used in all classes (and in 50-6 cars being rebuilt at the same time). In both cases the two ends of the car may be different.

Some of the cars were renumbered:
Fe-05  63000-63254 RENO 4400-4648  begin 1956
Fe-12  63651-63750 RENO 5100-5199  begin 1953
Fe-15  63255-63504 19 RENO 6360-6378 1943, IH 12-4, end doors, airplane, RENO back 1945-6 to original height
20 RENO 6670-6689  1944, XAP airplane parts, RENO back 1945-6
All remaining cars with end doors  RENO to 6700-6723  1949
Fe-19  5200-5599  5 RENO to 6550-6554? 1957 but off roster 1-1958

Photos of Fe-12s in original or renumbered series are probably rare. There were only 100. None of the usual on-line sites have one, nor any publication I have examined. If someone out there has one I would love to have a peak at it!

Thanks entertaining my thoughts on this!

Eric


Re: ATSF Fe-U 50' car Whose model is this??

Tim O'Connor
 


Steve I had exactly the same thought. And wouldn't a Santa Fe auto box of
that era have a massive fishbelly underframe?



Could it be scratch built or kit bashed?  The underframe appears to be Athearn, with the snap on coupler covers.  The ends look like the old stamped metal ones.  The hat section framing and sides look like wood shapes and sheets.  I remember the wrap around metal roof ribs, too.
 
Steve Hile


From: bill woelfel via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, May 10, 2018 9:42 AM
To: RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] ATSF Fe-U 50' car Whose model is this??

Sorry, forgot the link.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/332639060495


Re: ATSF Fe-U 50' car Whose model is this??

Steve and Barb Hile
 

Could it be scratch built or kit bashed?  The underframe appears to be Athearn, with the snap on coupler covers.  The ends look like the old stamped metal ones.  The hat section framing and sides look like wood shapes and sheets.  I remember the wrap around metal roof ribs, too.
 
Steve Hile



From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of bill woelfel via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, May 10, 2018 9:42 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] ATSF Fe-U 50' car Whose model is this??

Sorry, forgot the link. https://www.ebay.com/itm/HO-Scale-Unknown-ATSF-Santa-Fe-50-039-Box-Car-66201-Custom-Painted-Wood-Model-/332639060495?_trksid=p2047675.l2557&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&nma=true&si=MFJePdeMfBCNeZ5XSv3ijREO%252Fuw%253D&orig_cvip=true&rt=nc


Re: ATSF Fe-U 50' car Whose model is this??

Jon Miller
 

I can't seem to get ebay to show me closed auctions anymore.  Is this normal?


Re: ATSF Fe-U 50' car Whose model is this??

bill woelfel
 

Sorry, forgot the link. https://www.ebay.com/itm/HO-Scale-Unknown-ATSF-Santa-Fe-50-039-Box-Car-66201-Custom-Painted-Wood-Model-/332639060495?_trksid=p2047675.l2557&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&nma=true&si=MFJePdeMfBCNeZ5XSv3ijREO%252Fuw%253D&orig_cvip=true&rt=nc


ATSF Fe-U 50' car Whose model is this??

bill woelfel
 

Feebay just sold a HO  wooden kit (built)  that seems to be  a fair copy of an Fe-U. Who made this, I'd like to get a couple.  Thanks,  Bill Woelfel


Re: Archer Surface Details Decals

spsalso
 

I would recommend sourcing the drop grabs elsewhere.

Ed  

Edward Sutorik


Archer Surface Details Decals

Bill Welch
 

After Media Blasting twelve models Monday the crew at the Clearwater Car Shops was anxious to get to start on followup work and after washing up key areas of two models, brushed on Future/Pledge on two different Tichy USRA 50-ton rebuilds in preparation for applying Surface Detail Decals:

—Most of the Aluminum & Black scheme Georgia rebuilds had a welded roof with twelve panels. To model the butt weld joints I used Archer's "Aircraft Panel Line" #AR88013 set. I selected the narrowest lines as in the prototype roof photo I have of one of these cars the weld lines are barely visible. Before I applied the decals I used a square to mark the lines with a .005 pen to help me line up the decals. The Future/Pledge smeared some of the lines but not enough to interfere with lining up the Panel Line decals. Attached are three photos on my model with the "weld beads" in place. One caveat: Don't be tempted to trim the decal film too close to the lines as the film helps keep the lines straight and makes placing them much more manageable. The film is very thin and once the decals are in place and set with Microscale Red label is is not at all objectionable in my opinion.

—The P&LE model needed more rivets in addition to the harvested rivets I had already placed. The sides of each end are totally devoid of rivets and adding them made a big difference in making the model look finished. Previously I had used .005 styrene strips to recreate the flanges on the ends of the roof to create the illusion the metal of the roof ends over and covers the top of the end. This ares also received the Archers rivets from their #AR88087. Attached are four photos

I will give all of these decals one more application of Red label and then will seal then with Future/Pledge.

Bill Welch


Re: class of this ATSF box car?

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Eric,

I then suppose the car below is a former Fe-19. The class We-19 almost seems too easy. Photo taken in South Los Angeles, March 1975, complete with an insouciant pigeon on the roof (at extreme left).

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿



On 5/9/18 8:24 PM, Eric Lombard wrote:
Tim and Charlie... and everyone else who might have an interest:

Observations and thoughts...
In my original response(s) I did not consider the the other classes because the physical features of the car indicated Fe-19 to me.
1. The cars get bigger with time:
  1. Fe-5 inside width 9-2, inside height 10-4
  2. Fe-12 inside width 9-3, inside height 10-5
  3. Fe-15 inside width 9-5, inside height 10-5
  4. Fe-19 inside width 9-5, inside height 10-6
2. Some physical details change with time:
  1. Fe-5: at the corners the end plates wrap around and are riveted to the side plates as is seen in early steel cars, the ends of the body bolsters (or bolster extensions?) appear as an I-beam, the side sill reinforcement is confined to little more than the width of the door opening
  2. Fe-12: Photo needed!! 
  3. Fe-15: at the corners the end and side plates are covered by an angle riveted to both, the ends of the body bolsters appear as an I-beam, the side sill reinforcement is confined to little more than the width of the door opening.
  4. Fe-19: at the corners the end and side plates are covered by an angle riveted to both, the ends of the body bolsters are covered by a large channel "tab", the side sill reinforcement extends a side panel width beyond the outer edge of the main door (though I have seen one photo of an early member of the series with the short reinforcement).
The features of the car in question is identical to #4, a Fe-19 as is the car nee #5792 in the Arizona Ry Museum. 

The end features of the cars are apparently NOT class specific - at least that anyone has been able to determine. Rather mixes of "reverse" Dreadnaught and reverse Murphy panels and blank sheets are used in all classes (and in 50-6 cars being rebuilt at the same time). In both cases the two ends of the car may be different.

Some of the cars were renumbered:
Fe-05  63000-63254 RENO 4400-4648  begin 1956
Fe-12  63651-63750 RENO 5100-5199  begin 1953
Fe-15  63255-63504 19 RENO 6360-6378 1943, IH 12-4, end doors, airplane, RENO back 1945-6 to original height
20 RENO 6670-6689  1944, XAP airplane parts, RENO back 1945-6
All remaining cars with end doors  RENO to 6700-6723  1949
Fe-19  5200-5599  5 RENO to 6550-6554? 1957 but off roster 1-1958

Photos of Fe-12s in original or renumbered series are probably rare. There were only 100. None of the usual on-line sites have one, nor any publication I have examined. If someone out there has one I would love to have a peak at it!

Thanks entertaining my thoughts on this!

Eric



Fw: Spring 2018 Keystone Modeler is available

Bruce Smith
 


Folks,


Issue 104 of The Keystone Modeler, Spring 2018, is now available, free, online at:

http://www.prrths.com/newprr_files/newPRRKeystoneModeler.htm

Regards,
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, Al


Re: class of this ATSF box car?

Eric Lombard
 

Tim and Charlie... and everyone else who might have an interest:

Observations and thoughts...
In my original response(s) I did not consider the the other classes because the physical features of the car indicated Fe-19 to me.
1. The cars get bigger with time:
  1. Fe-5 inside width 9-2, inside height 10-4
  2. Fe-12 inside width 9-3, inside height 10-5
  3. Fe-15 inside width 9-5, inside height 10-5
  4. Fe-19 inside width 9-5, inside height 10-6
2. Some physical details change with time:
  1. Fe-5: at the corners the end plates wrap around and are riveted to the side plates as is seen in early steel cars, the ends of the body bolsters (or bolster extensions?) appear as an I-beam, the side sill reinforcement is confined to little more than the width of the door opening
  2. Fe-12: Photo needed!! 
  3. Fe-15: at the corners the end and side plates are covered by an angle riveted to both, the ends of the body bolsters appear as an I-beam, the side sill reinforcement is confined to little more than the width of the door opening.
  4. Fe-19: at the corners the end and side plates are covered by an angle riveted to both, the ends of the body bolsters are covered by a large channel "tab", the side sill reinforcement extends a side panel width beyond the outer edge of the main door (though I have seen one photo of an early member of the series with the short reinforcement).
The features of the car in question is identical to #4, a Fe-19 as is the car nee #5792 in the Arizona Ry Museum. 

The end features of the cars are apparently NOT class specific - at least that anyone has been able to determine. Rather mixes of "reverse" Dreadnaught and reverse Murphy panels and blank sheets are used in all classes (and in 50-6 cars being rebuilt at the same time). In both cases the two ends of the car may be different.

Some of the cars were renumbered:
Fe-05  63000-63254 RENO 4400-4648  begin 1956
Fe-12  63651-63750 RENO 5100-5199  begin 1953
Fe-15  63255-63504 19 RENO 6360-6378 1943, IH 12-4, end doors, airplane, RENO back 1945-6 to original height
20 RENO 6670-6689  1944, XAP airplane parts, RENO back 1945-6
All remaining cars with end doors  RENO to 6700-6723  1949
Fe-19  5200-5599  5 RENO to 6550-6554? 1957 but off roster 1-1958

Photos of Fe-12s in original or renumbered series are probably rare. There were only 100. None of the usual on-line sites have one, nor any publication I have examined. If someone out there has one I would love to have a peak at it!

Thanks entertaining my thoughts on this!

Eric


Re: Brake line pressure

Dave Nelson
 

Very interesting.  Thanks Dennis, this will raise some issues for our sim software.

 

Dave Nelson

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Tuesday, May 08, 2018 5:39 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Brake line pressure

 

As promised, I dug out my Soo Line Air Brake Rules book, but unfortunately, it slightly post dates the steam era: December, 1962. However, here are the pressures specified at that time, all numbers are PSI:

AIR COMPRESSOR GOVERNOR -130-140
FEED VALVES, PASSENGER SERVICE - 90
FEED VALVES, ALL OTHER CLASSES OF SERVICE EXCEPT ORE SERVICE - 75
FEED VALVES, ORE SERVICE - 90
FEED VALVES, SWITCHING SERVICE - 70

As one can see, the pressure setting was variable with the service, and as the feed valve was in th cab, the engineer was expected to ensure it was set properly for the service.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Westerfield 4801 ATSF BX-13 Photos or Info - Modeling Fall 1950

tjcataldo
 

if you go the santa fe modelers web site you can bye a book on freight cars

tom

On Wed, May 9, 2018 at 10:56 AM, Sean Murphy <sean.p.murphy.design@...> wrote:
Westerfield 4801 ATSF BX-13 Photos or Info - Modeling Fall 1950

Does anyone have photos of this prototype from 1950 or the late 1940's? Additional number or equipment roster information would also be helpful. Lastly, I was also wondering if the recommended Dalman trucks would be appropriate for this era.

Thanks ahead of time.




--
Thomas  j Cataldo


Re: [Espee] The Slow Death Of A Boxcar

BRIAN PAUL EHNI
 

Got it!

 

 

Thanks!
--
Brian Ehni

 

From: <Espee@groups.io> on behalf of "Doug Debs via Groups.Io" <dougdebs2472@...>
Reply-To: <Espee@groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, May 9, 2018 at 2:15 PM
To: "Espee@groups.io" <Espee@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Espee] The Slow Death Of A Boxcar

 

Its sugar cane.

 

The second photo shows a 4-mule team hitched to an empty wagon, used to haul sugar cane from the field to the portable jib crane loading station. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bagasse

"Bagasse (/bəˈɡæs/ bə-GAS) is the fibrous matter that remains after sugarcane or sorghum stalks are crushed to extract their juice. It is dry pulpy residue left after the extraction of juice from sugar cane. Bagasse is used as a biofuel and in the manufacture of pulp and building materials."

Bagasse, on the other hand, was generated at the sugar mill.  In this era, the mill boilers used all or almost all of the bagasse as fuel.  Burning bagasse doesn't generate much heat (low BTUs per lb, especially if still wet), but it was what they had in abundance at no cost... except for the semi-unskilled labor needed to dry the bagasse, move it to the furnace firing floor, fire the boilers, and remove the ash afterwards.  But labor was very cheap in that era.  Special chain-grate stokers were developed to handle the large quantities of low-BTU bagasse used by sugar mill boilers.

 

Bagasse looks looks different than cane:

 

- Doug Debs

 


From: BRIAN PAUL EHNI <bpehni@...>
To: Espee@groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, May 9, 2018 11:58 AM
Subject: Re: [Espee] The Slow Death Of A Boxcar

 

Cane or bagesse?

 

 

Thanks!
--
Brian Ehni

 

From: <Espee@groups.io> on behalf of Bob Chaparro <chiefbobbb@...>
Reply-To: <Espee@groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, May 9, 2018 at 12:28 PM
To: <Espee@groups.io>
Subject: [Espee] The Slow Death Of A Boxcar

 

This almost certainly was the last "assigned service" for T&NO 35247. Its glory days were long gone. The photos are from the Library of Congress.

Loading sugarcane into boxcars near Delcambre, Louisiana, 1938:

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

 


Aligning A Freight Car To A Loading Door

Bob Chaparro
 

Courtesy of Bob Drenth and Jeff Aley...

In cases where track and building did not allow man to be on that side of a car to get doors lined up- usually the rail directly outside the door would get painted red or yellow –so a switchman could use that as a guide to spot the car-get the door of the car directly above the paint and the car and building would be “close enough” for the loading to proceed..

Bob

++++

I find this very interesting – it’s simple and clever.  I had never noticed this before; was this a common practice?  And if so, were industries doing so back in the early 1950’s (I don’t see why not)?

Jeff

++++

Was this commonplace or just particular to certain railroads? Does anyone have a photo or photo link?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: The Slow Death Of A Boxcar

BRIAN PAUL EHNI
 

Cane or bagesse?

 

 

Thanks!
--
Brian Ehni

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Bob Chaparro <chiefbobbb@...>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, May 9, 2018 at 12:28 PM
To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] The Slow Death Of A Boxcar

 

This almost certainly was the last "assigned service" for T&NO 35247. Its glory days were long gone. The photos are from the Library of Congress.

Loading sugarcane into boxcars near Delcambre, Louisiana, 1938:

https://cdn.loc.gov/service/pnp/fsa/8b20000/8b20700/8b20794v.jpg

https://cdn.loc.gov/service/pnp/fsa/8b20000/8b20700/8b20793v.jpg

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

24681 - 24700 of 181095