Date   

Re: Athearn blue box gon

Richard Townsend
 

I searched unsuccessfully for a "print" button myself. But then I just clicked "Control P" and it printed as a pdf. Be aware it is a huge file, well over 100 megs.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Enzo Fortuna <fortuna.enzo@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Wed, May 16, 2018 8:42 am
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Athearn blue box gon

BUT... seems no way to dowload the pdf and read it off line?
I've not find the way, any trick?
Cheers
Enzo Fortuna
Modeling the friendly Espee in ... Italy


Re: Athearn blue box gon

Enzo Fortuna
 

BUT... seems no way to dowload the pdf and read it off line?
I've not find the way, any trick?
Cheers
Enzo Fortuna
Modeling the friendly Espee in ... Italy


Re: GN 40' Truss Rod Boxcars

Dennis Storzek
 

If you are looking for large format drawings that "show all", you might search your roster for cars that were built by either Pullman or Haskell & Barker, then contact the Pullman Library at the Illinois Railway Museum :https://www.irm.org/pullmanlibrary/

It's easiest to find drawings by builders lot number, but possible by road and date. 1901 is a bit early for the collection, but just about every freightcar produced after 1909 will have some information. Each lot typically has a 1" scale general arrangement drawing (the format typically presented in the Car Builder's Cyc's), a separate 1" scale drawing of the underframe, another of "steel details", and multiple smaller large scale drawings of component parts, sometimes including trucks. Occasionally there is a lettering arrangement drawing. The large scale drawings can be ungainly to work with, and I find it easier to order them at 50% reduction and use a magnifying glass to read the smallest dimensions; the sheets are still completely legible at this size, but the total sheet size is reduced to about 2' x 3'.

The reproduction fees nay seem a bit high at the onset, but the wealth of information is worth the price.

Dennis Storzek


Re: GN 40' Truss Rod Boxcars

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi Howard and Mike and List Members,
 
I have managed to locate many older issues of Railway and Engineering Review online, but not this one.
 
Anyone have any success turning this one up?
 
Claus Schlund
 
 
 

From: Schleigh Mike via Groups.Io
Sent: Wednesday, May 16, 2018 9:06 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] GN 40' Truss Rod Boxcars
 
Thank You Howard!
 
We will pursue this source.
 
Regards from Grove City, Penna.  Mike Schleigh
 
On Wednesday, May 16, 2018, 6:07:15 AM EDT, earlyrail <cascaderail@...> wrote:
 
 
Yes,
The Railway and Engineering Review, February 23, 1901, page 100
Howard Garner
 

Virus-free. www.avast.com


TrainLife site

Eric Hansmann
 

TrainLife seems to be the ExactRail storefront. Here’s the index page for the magazines that are available to view online.

https://trainlife.com/pages/the-magazine-library

 

 

Some issues are missing and portions of some issues are also missing. But it is better than nothing.

 

 

 

Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

 


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tim O'Connor
Sent: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 6:22 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Athearn blue box gon

 


Awesome, thanks! I didn't know Trainlife had come back to life! For a long time
it seemed to be unavailable...

Tim O'



Re: GN 40' Truss Rod Boxcars

Schleigh Mike
 

Thank You Howard!

We will pursue this source.

Regards from Grove City, Penna.  Mike Schleigh

On Wednesday, May 16, 2018, 6:07:15 AM EDT, earlyrail <cascaderail@...> wrote:


Yes,
The Railway and Engineering Review, February 23, 1901, page 100
Howard Garner


Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Calcium carbide car?

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Gang;

NYC owned calcium carbide container cars with cylindrical removable containers in a rack. PRR owned none, although they did accept smaller square industry containers for shipment in gons.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of davidbriel2000 via Groups.Io
Sent: Wednesday, May 16, 2018 8:39 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Calcium carbide car?

This is the old AHM HO model of the Calcium Carbide Flatcar. Sorry about the post STEAM era roadname, I do not know if the NYC or PRR owned any calcium carbide flatcars. David Briel



-----Original Message-----
From: BRIAN PAUL EHNI <bpehni@gmail.com>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Wed, May 16, 2018 8:19 am
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Calcium carbide car?


Wooden walkways don’t spark.


Thanks!
--
Brian Ehni

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> > on behalf of RICH CHAPIN <rwc27q@verizon.net <mailto:rwc27q@verizon.net> >
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> >
Date: Wednesday, May 16, 2018 at 6:50 AM
To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> >
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Calcium carbide car?

Google “calcium carbide container” and you’ll see drums [55 gal] and 5 gal plastic pails and some neat container cars—all currently used; use the wayback machine then imagine the interior of the car when loaded back then—I can see drums, or barrels or cans –all water tight, in that car—still doesn’t explain the wooden walkways, although maybe the spaces along the sides fit one drum—a single row along the exterior to limit the amount in the car; since we don’t “know” the car was used transport calcium carbide, which could simply be the name of the car, not the use of the car, I can view the above as a morning swag

Windows for light I’d say

Rich Chapin


Re: Calcium carbide car?

davidbriel2000 <DBriel1782@...>
 

This is the old AHM HO model of the Calcium Carbide Flatcar. Sorry about the post STEAM era roadname, I do not know if the NYC or PRR owned any calcium carbide flatcars. David Briel


-----Original Message-----
From: BRIAN PAUL EHNI <bpehni@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Wed, May 16, 2018 8:19 am
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Calcium carbide car?

Wooden walkways don’t spark.
 
 
Thanks!
--
Brian Ehni
 
From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of RICH CHAPIN <rwc27q@...>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, May 16, 2018 at 6:50 AM
To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Calcium carbide car?
 
Google “calcium carbide container” and you’ll see drums [55 gal] and 5 gal plastic pails and some neat container cars—all currently used;  use the wayback machine then imagine the interior of the car when loaded back then—I can see drums, or barrels or cans –all water tight,  in that car—still doesn’t explain the wooden walkways, although maybe the spaces along the sides fit one drum—a single row along the exterior to limit the amount in the car; since we don’t “know” the car was used transport calcium carbide, which could simply be the name of the car, not the use of the car, I can view the above as a morning swag
 
Windows for light I’d say
 
Rich Chapin
 


Re: Calcium carbide car?

 

Wooden walkways don’t spark.

 

 

Thanks!
--
Brian Ehni

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of RICH CHAPIN <rwc27q@...>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, May 16, 2018 at 6:50 AM
To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Calcium carbide car?

 

Google “calcium carbide container” and you’ll see drums [55 gal] and 5 gal plastic pails and some neat container cars—all currently used;  use the wayback machine then imagine the interior of the car when loaded back then—I can see drums, or barrels or cans –all water tight,  in that car—still doesn’t explain the wooden walkways, although maybe the spaces along the sides fit one drum—a single row along the exterior to limit the amount in the car; since we don’t “know” the car was used transport calcium carbide, which could simply be the name of the car, not the use of the car, I can view the above as a morning swag

 

Windows for light I’d say

 

Rich Chapin

 


Re: Calcium carbide car?

RICH CHAPIN
 

Google “calcium carbide container” and you’ll see drums [55 gal] and 5 gal plastic pails and some neat container cars—all currently used;  use the wayback machine then imagine the interior of the car when loaded back then—I can see drums, or barrels or cans –all water tight,  in that car—still doesn’t explain the wooden walkways, although maybe the spaces along the sides fit one drum—a single row along the exterior to limit the amount in the car; since we don’t “know” the car was used transport calcium carbide, which could simply be the name of the car, not the use of the car, I can view the above as a morning swag

 

Windows for light I’d say

 

Rich Chapin

 


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Boxcar identification help requested

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

I think that is highly possible. I remember old "floodlights" in storage in a yard somewhere that looked awfully like big versions of a spelunking lamp.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Steve and Barb Hile
Sent: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 4:19 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Boxcar identification help requested

What about use for portable flood lights at the site of a derailment?

Steve Hile

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf
Of David Soderblom
Sent: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 3:09 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Boxcar identification help requested

Calcium carbide is indeed used to generate acetylene. Most common use
is/was in miners' helmets. It releases C2H2 when mixed with water, so a
small reservoir would drip onto the carbide. I very much doubt that calcium
carbide output would be used for welding: just too slow, difficult to
regulate, and you buy tanks of gas for that.

Was PRR engaged in a tunneling project at the time? That would explain the
need for the material for the workers.


David Soderblom
Baltimore MD
david.soderblom@gmail.com


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Boxcar identification help requested

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Spelunking lamps most certainly were. I remember them well. They went drip, drip, drip onto a pile of carbide, and produced light.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Schuyler Larrabee
Sent: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 7:34 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Boxcar identification help requested

I remember my dad talking about "Carbide lamps."
Long ago enough that I can't recall the context or what kind of lamps, but the miner's lamps seems right. Still, boxcar loads of that for worker's lamps?

Were lanterns EVER made that used carbide?

Schuyler

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
<main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of
staplindave via Groups.Io
Sent: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 6:53 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Boxcar identification help requested

Before portable electric light plants and generators, I believe they used calcium carbide to provide lighting at derailments.

Dave Staplin


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Boxcar identification help requested

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Gang;

I thought for a bit that it might be PRR's idea for a "waycar" as an expedient during WW2. PRR was rebuilding X23 box cars as NX23 cabin cars, and this might've blended that concept, thus the passenger car equipments. I just don't know about this car. It has a lot of PRR features about it.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of rwitt_2000 via Groups.Io
Sent: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 10:15 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Boxcar identification help requested

I can't contribute much more than what has been discussed, but I do note the car also has a bracket for a rear marker. It seems to be equipped for passenger service, but why.

Could the Hagley site have the caption wrong?

Bob Witt


Re: GN 40' Truss Rod Boxcars

earlyrail
 

Yes,
The Railway and Engineering Review, February 23, 1901, page 100
Howard Garner


Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: Boxcar identification help requested

Bruce Smith
 

Claus,


Ah, no, because the B50 is still on the rolls in 1953 as car 10001 in the ORPTE

http://pennsyrr.com/kc/passops/downloads/orpte_5301.pdf


Regards,

Bruce 

Bruce Smith,

Temporarily in Chicago, Illinois



From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) <claus@...>
Sent: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 9:40 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Boxcar identification help requested
 
Bruce, Elden, Group members,
 
Maybe it is a rebuild of this singleton car:
 
B50 baggage express car #10001, American Railway Express
 
 
Claus Schlund
 
 
 
From: Bruce Smith
Sent: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 12:26 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Boxcar identification help requested
 
Elden, Folks
 
Brian Carlson pointed out photos of this car at the Hagley site.  It is a “Calcium Carbide” car…. Not that this sheds any light on the origin of the car…
 
Now the puzzle is complicated by the question what would PRR MOW forces have used a car, likely loaded with sacks of Calcium Carbonate for?

Regards

Bruce

 

Bruce F. Smith           

Auburn, AL

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."
 

On May 15, 2018, at 11:17 AM, Gatwood, Elden J SAD <elden.j.gatwood@...> wrote:
 
Bruce;

I have been thinking about this since the Meet (thanks for sharing them!), and I had a few thoughts:

The sides have distinct flavor of X29, with post rivets of closer and wider spacing, not a single rivet row, and 4/4 sides;

The IH is also similarly low;

The shallow X29-like side sill with no substantial evidence of cross-bearers either under the door frame or closer to the trucks;

The roof appears to be a lap-seam design, with fairly narrow spacing, but distinct raises where the seam is, possible to minimize water entry.  No standing seam caps.  Has no look of a commercial roof, more like a home-built job;

The use of Crown trucks, which were common on the PRR;

The "plate" end, with X29/X31-ish stamped poling pockets;

The use of a narrow end walkway and cabin car-like hand grab;

The side door looking like an express or baggage car door.  And with windows in one end only.

This looks to me to be a kind of one-off PRR-built WW2 expedient special purpose car that ran in a wreck train/emergency train.  Like maybe responses to WW 2 emergencies along the ROW.

I hope we find the correspondence some time.  If those inept German saboteurs had done something big, we might've seen this car on the "curve"!

Thanks again for sharing!

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bruce Smith
Sent: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 11:28 AM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Boxcar identification help requested

Folks,



I found the attached photos of PRR 495655 at Bob's Photos at the 50th anniversary PRRT&HS meeting this weekend.  The photos pose a real conundrum as to the origin of the boxcar(?) depicted.  Here are the facts as I see them

1) The photo is dated 1/43 and appears to document a new MOW conversion, given the gray paint with black lettering and lack of any of the stencils needed for interchange.

2) The car has a straight center sill, AB brakes, and andrews trucks

3) The roof appears to be a new add-on and seriously overhangs the sides​. Any suggestions as to the roof type are welcome

4) There is no running board or ladders to reach the roof of the car.

5) There is no end sill. 

6) There appears to be a steam line visible on the end of the car.

7) The car has end doors, end grab irons, and a side "express" style door

8) The car is steel with 4 sheets to each side of the door.

Given the andrews truck, I thought X26 rebuild, but the underframe is not a USRA underframe. The sides do not resemble either the X25 or X29 series of cars. Given the steam line, this car may have previously been in express service (and the side and/or end doors may be a remnant of that, or may be new to the conversion).

So, bottom line? This does not appear to be a modification of any PRR boxcar class as far as I can tell.  In discussions this weekend, we postulated that it could be a wreck write off from another road, or possibly, a "scratchbuilt" box from available components. Can anyone out there identify the car that was used for this MOW conversion?

Regards
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, Al


Re: Boxcar identification help requested

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Bruce, Elden, Group members,
 
Maybe it is a rebuild of this singleton car:
 
B50 baggage express car #10001, American Railway Express
 
 
Claus Schlund
 
 
 

From: Bruce Smith
Sent: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 12:26 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Boxcar identification help requested
 
Elden, Folks
 
Brian Carlson pointed out photos of this car at the Hagley site.  It is a “Calcium Carbide” car…. Not that this sheds any light on the origin of the car…
 
Now the puzzle is complicated by the question what would PRR MOW forces have used a car, likely loaded with sacks of Calcium Carbonate for?

Regards

Bruce

 

Bruce F. Smith           

Auburn, AL

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."
 

On May 15, 2018, at 11:17 AM, Gatwood, Elden J SAD <elden.j.gatwood@...> wrote:
 
Bruce;

I have been thinking about this since the Meet (thanks for sharing them!), and I had a few thoughts:

The sides have distinct flavor of X29, with post rivets of closer and wider spacing, not a single rivet row, and 4/4 sides;

The IH is also similarly low;

The shallow X29-like side sill with no substantial evidence of cross-bearers either under the door frame or closer to the trucks;

The roof appears to be a lap-seam design, with fairly narrow spacing, but distinct raises where the seam is, possible to minimize water entry.  No standing seam caps.  Has no look of a commercial roof, more like a home-built job;

The use of Crown trucks, which were common on the PRR;

The "plate" end, with X29/X31-ish stamped poling pockets;

The use of a narrow end walkway and cabin car-like hand grab;

The side door looking like an express or baggage car door.  And with windows in one end only.

This looks to me to be a kind of one-off PRR-built WW2 expedient special purpose car that ran in a wreck train/emergency train.  Like maybe responses to WW 2 emergencies along the ROW.

I hope we find the correspondence some time.  If those inept German saboteurs had done something big, we might've seen this car on the "curve"!

Thanks again for sharing!

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bruce Smith
Sent: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 11:28 AM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Boxcar identification help requested

Folks,



I found the attached photos of PRR 495655 at Bob's Photos at the 50th anniversary PRRT&HS meeting this weekend.  The photos pose a real conundrum as to the origin of the boxcar(?) depicted.  Here are the facts as I see them

1) The photo is dated 1/43 and appears to document a new MOW conversion, given the gray paint with black lettering and lack of any of the stencils needed for interchange.

2) The car has a straight center sill, AB brakes, and andrews trucks

3) The roof appears to be a new add-on and seriously overhangs the sides​. Any suggestions as to the roof type are welcome

4) There is no running board or ladders to reach the roof of the car.

5) There is no end sill. 

6) There appears to be a steam line visible on the end of the car.

7) The car has end doors, end grab irons, and a side "express" style door

8) The car is steel with 4 sheets to each side of the door.

Given the andrews truck, I thought X26 rebuild, but the underframe is not a USRA underframe. The sides do not resemble either the X25 or X29 series of cars. Given the steam line, this car may have previously been in express service (and the side and/or end doors may be a remnant of that, or may be new to the conversion).

So, bottom line? This does not appear to be a modification of any PRR boxcar class as far as I can tell.  In discussions this weekend, we postulated that it could be a wreck write off from another road, or possibly, a "scratchbuilt" box from available components. Can anyone out there identify the car that was used for this MOW conversion?

Regards
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, Al


Re: Boxcar identification help requested

rwitt_2000
 

I can't contribute much more than what has been discussed, but I do note the car also has a bracket for a rear marker. It seems to be equipped for passenger service, but why.

Could the Hagley site have the caption wrong?

Bob Witt


Calcuim carbide car?

D. Scott Chatfield
 

Um, why would a car designed to haul something that is very dangerous when wet have _windows_?


Scott Chatfield


GN 40' Truss Rod Boxcars

Schleigh Mike
 

The Great Northern bought nearly 20,000 40 foot, DS boxcars starting in 1901.  Various versions have been modeled in various media and scales by various companies.  Were general arrangement drawings ever published or otherwise available for these cars 'as built' with a wood or steel underframe?  I am aware of hand have the Mainline Modeler October 1981 drawing.  Something a bit more technically detailed is desired.

Thanking in advance----Mike Schleigh in Grove City, Penna.


Re: Boxcar identification help requested

Schuyler Larrabee
 

I remember my dad talking about "Carbide lamps."
Long ago enough that I can't recall the context or
what kind of lamps, but the miner's lamps seems
right. Still, boxcar loads of that for worker's
lamps?

Were lanterns EVER made that used carbide?

Schuyler

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
<main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of
staplindave via Groups.Io
Sent: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 6:53 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Boxcar identification
help requested

Before portable electric light plants and
generators, I believe they used calcium carbide to
provide lighting at derailments.

Dave Staplin

30701 - 30720 of 187187