Date   

Re: Name that gondola end?

John Barry
 

Mike,

Most likely a Monon gon, but it could be a SOO line as they had some too.  The cars can be modeled with the Intermountain USRA gon and a Shapeways end.  We had a good discussion on a number of these in the Barriger collection several months back.
 
John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 
Lovettsville, VA

707-490-9696 

PO Box 44736 
Washington, DC 20026-4736



From: MDelvec952 via Groups.Io <MDelvec952@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Sent: Friday, May 18, 2018 10:26 PM
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Name that gondola end?



Came across a photo of a freight yard, and one one of the tracks is the end of a gondola I hadn't seen before. I'm sharing it here so that others may see it, and so that some may be able to identify it, with one continuous indentation filling the end, like lines on a vinyl record.

                       ....Mike 





Name that gondola end?

MDelvec952
 



Came across a photo of a freight yard, and one one of the tracks is the end of a gondola I hadn't seen before. I'm sharing it here so that others may see it, and so that some may be able to identify it, with one continuous indentation filling the end, like lines on a vinyl record.

                       ....Mike 



Name that gondola end?

MDelvec952
 



Came across a photo of a freight yard, and one one of the tracks is the end of a gondola I hadn't seen before. I'm sharing it here so that others may see it, and so that some may be able to identify it, with one continuous indentation filling the end, like lines on a vinyl record.

                       ....Mike 



Re: Why Transfer cabooses?

MDelvec952
 



Transfer jobs usually required shoving long strings of cars from departure tracks in one yard to arrival tracks in others, often to another railroad. For a trainman to ride the side of a boxcar over those distances was strenuous and risky. The transfer cabooses were often simply a platform of some sort to provide a place to ride for these long shoves. Correct, transfer cabooses didn't need all the appointments of a road caboose since they weren't going far, and since they often stayed with the cut of cars and returned on the reciprocal move. Also, certain union arbitraries provided for extra pay to trainmen who had to ride long shoves without a caboose.  Most transfer hacks didn't have cupolas so that the locomotive headlight could shine above the roof of the transfer caboose when a locomotive was coupled to it. In the days before radios, the trainmen space themselves out on the roofs of the train to pass hand signals between the leading end and the engineer.

                  ....Mike Del Vecchio


-----Original Message-----
From: jace6315 via Groups.Io <jace6315@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Fri, May 18, 2018 6:43 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Why Transfer cabooses?

I believe that some roads invested in transfer cabooses to win favor with the union. I wouldn't be surprised if the NYC had this in mind when they rebuilt a bunch of boxcar frames into transfer cabs right before the PC merger. It definitely didn't hurt that they had lots and lots of comparatively young, obsolete 40' boxcars to work with.

Jim Matthews 

-------- Original message --------
From: Jack Mullen <jack.f.mullen@...>
Date: 5/19/18 12:16 AM (GMT+01:00)
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Why Transfer cabooses?

I might not be one of those addressed  ;^)  but I'll offer this anyway. 
The various forms of transfer caboose are cheap, compared to new "regular" cabooses. If you have a surplus of good road cabooses, fine, assign some to transfer service. If you need to replace some older road cabooses, fine, invest in new ones from International or Thrall, and cascade the old hacks to transfer service after stripping the interiors of unneeded stuff, such as bunks.
But otherwise, why buy?  Grab a surplus/obsolescent flatcar, have the car shop weld up a basic steel box with two doors and a heater, add basic steps, renew the deck and put handrails around, and you're good to go. The cash outlay is small, the flatcar was fully depreciated so the capital cost is also.
Jack Mullen


Re: Why Transfer cabooses?

jace6315
 

I believe that some roads invested in transfer cabooses to win favor with the union. I wouldn't be surprised if the NYC had this in mind when they rebuilt a bunch of boxcar frames into transfer cabs right before the PC merger. It definitely didn't hurt that they had lots and lots of comparatively young, obsolete 40' boxcars to work with.

Jim Matthews 

-------- Original message --------
From: Jack Mullen <jack.f.mullen@...>
Date: 5/19/18 12:16 AM (GMT+01:00)
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Why Transfer cabooses?

I might not be one of those addressed  ;^)  but I'll offer this anyway. 
The various forms of transfer caboose are cheap, compared to new "regular" cabooses. If you have a surplus of good road cabooses, fine, assign some to transfer service. If you need to replace some older road cabooses, fine, invest in new ones from International or Thrall, and cascade the old hacks to transfer service after stripping the interiors of unneeded stuff, such as bunks.
But otherwise, why buy?  Grab a surplus/obsolescent flatcar, have the car shop weld up a basic steel box with two doors and a heater, add basic steps, renew the deck and put handrails around, and you're good to go. The cash outlay is small, the flatcar was fully depreciated so the capital cost is also.
Jack Mullen


Re: Why Transfer cabooses?

Jack Mullen
 

I might not be one of those addressed  ;^)  but I'll offer this anyway. 
The various forms of transfer caboose are cheap, compared to new "regular" cabooses. If you have a surplus of good road cabooses, fine, assign some to transfer service. If you need to replace some older road cabooses, fine, invest in new ones from International or Thrall, and cascade the old hacks to transfer service after stripping the interiors of unneeded stuff, such as bunks.
But otherwise, why buy?  Grab a surplus/obsolescent flatcar, have the car shop weld up a basic steel box with two doors and a heater, add basic steps, renew the deck and put handrails around, and you're good to go. The cash outlay is small, the flatcar was fully depreciated so the capital cost is also.
Jack Mullen


Re: Why Transfer cabooses?

Ray Breyer
 


>>On Friday, May 18, 2018, 4:05:50 PM CDT, Aley, Jeff A <Jeff.A.Aley@...> wrote:
>>Why did many railroads build special “transfer cabooses”?  Why not just use a regular caboose?  It seems like extra effort to 
>>build the “shack on a flat”, and I don’t understand why that effort is justified.
>>Thanks,
>>Jeff


Most transfer cabooses weren't outhouses on flat cars; they were typically old, worn out regular cabooses with their cupolas either removed or boarded over so they couldn't be used. If a railroad needed a few transfer cabooses purpose built they usually turned to old boxcars and gave them vestibule ends and a few windows.

The reason was simple: terminals had a lot of slow going, and a lot of slack action. You didn't WANT crews in the cupolas, because the risk of falling was far higher than while on the road. The purpose built or rebuilt transfer cabooses were cupola-less for the same reason. 

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL


  


Why Transfer cabooses?

Aley, Jeff A
 

Learned and Esteemed Listmembers (you know who you are!),

 

               Why did many railroads build special “transfer cabooses”?  Why not just use a regular caboose?  It seems like extra effort to build the “shack on a flat”, and I don’t understand why that effort is justified.

 

Thanks,

 

-Jeff

 


Merchants Despatch

George Corral
 

Hi all,

I'm looking for the book Merchants Despatch, Its History and Equipment by Roger C. Hinman.

If you have a copy you don't mind sending my way, please contact me at    aileron44@...


George Corral
La Grange, KY


FOR SALE HO Kits

Storey Lindsay
 

Group,

 

I still have a few Sunshine, Westerfield, and Funaro & Camerlengo HO-Scale resin kits I need to find new homes for. I have reduced the prices in order to clear them out. If you are interested, please let me know OFFLINE at --  storey.lindsay@... -- and I will send you a list of what is still available.  Thanks for your interest.

Storey Lindsay
Celje, Slovenia

 


Re: Accurail acquired Rib Side Cars tooling

George Byers <gbyers@...>
 

Dennis,

I'm glad to hear Accurail has purchased George Schmidt's tooling and parts.  These are cars Milwaukee modelers have wanted for decades.  Sorry that he closed his company.

See the attached list for the Rib Side Car kits I have.  Most cars were on his website.  The 5411 and 5413 kits were not.  These are the 40ft cars "stretched" to 50ft  by added a 10ft section in the middle.  The 5411 and 5413 are the same car with different lettering. 

Contact me directly if you want any information from the kits.

George Byers
Milwaukee, WI
email: gbyers@...
Cell ph.: 414-507-1427


Re: GN 40' Truss Rod Boxcars

earlyrail
 

Attachment did not work.
Can not save a pdf to the images area.
It says I am not authorized to add a folder to the files area.
Send me an email and I will forward a pdf file from the Railway Engineering and Review
cascaderail  at  bellsouth  net

Howard Garner


Re: GN 40' Truss Rod Boxcars

earlyrail
 


I found my copy at the University of Minnesota library.
There should be pdf a copy attached


Re: ATSF Fe-U 50' car Whose model is this??

Scott
 

Can anybody make out what the placard says on the door?  It blurs out on my phone when it try and zoom in.

Scott McDonald


Re: Calcuim carbide car?

mopacfirst
 

One possible answer is that the windows might have been intended as 'explosion hatches'.  I've seen a calcium carbide explosion, on a small cinderblock building about 15' x 15', in 1979.  It didn't blow the roof completely off, but it lifted the roof far enough that it settled back down out of place.

Ron Merrick


Re: Athearn blue box gon

Robert J Miller CFA
 

If you are using a Windows PC try using SNIP. You can locate SNIP by clicking on the Windows icon (lower left corner of your Task Bar), then opening “Search”. Start typing “snip” and it should pop up. 

NOTE: I have not tried using SNIP with Train Life myself, but it has worked with other sites.


On May 16, 2018, at 6:06 AM, Enzo Fortuna <fortuna.enzo@...> wrote:

BUT... seems no way to dowload the pdf and read it off line?
I've not find the way, any trick?
Cheers
Enzo Fortuna
Modeling the friendly Espee in ... Italy


Re: Athearn blue box gon

Richard Townsend
 

I searched unsuccessfully for a "print" button myself. But then I just clicked "Control P" and it printed as a pdf. Be aware it is a huge file, well over 100 megs.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Enzo Fortuna <fortuna.enzo@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Wed, May 16, 2018 8:42 am
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Athearn blue box gon

BUT... seems no way to dowload the pdf and read it off line?
I've not find the way, any trick?
Cheers
Enzo Fortuna
Modeling the friendly Espee in ... Italy


Re: Athearn blue box gon

Enzo Fortuna
 

BUT... seems no way to dowload the pdf and read it off line?
I've not find the way, any trick?
Cheers
Enzo Fortuna
Modeling the friendly Espee in ... Italy


Re: GN 40' Truss Rod Boxcars

Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
 

If you are looking for large format drawings that "show all", you might search your roster for cars that were built by either Pullman or Haskell & Barker, then contact the Pullman Library at the Illinois Railway Museum :https://www.irm.org/pullmanlibrary/

It's easiest to find drawings by builders lot number, but possible by road and date. 1901 is a bit early for the collection, but just about every freightcar produced after 1909 will have some information. Each lot typically has a 1" scale general arrangement drawing (the format typically presented in the Car Builder's Cyc's), a separate 1" scale drawing of the underframe, another of "steel details", and multiple smaller large scale drawings of component parts, sometimes including trucks. Occasionally there is a lettering arrangement drawing. The large scale drawings can be ungainly to work with, and I find it easier to order them at 50% reduction and use a magnifying glass to read the smallest dimensions; the sheets are still completely legible at this size, but the total sheet size is reduced to about 2' x 3'.

The reproduction fees nay seem a bit high at the onset, but the wealth of information is worth the price.

Dennis Storzek


Re: GN 40' Truss Rod Boxcars

Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)
 

Hi Howard and Mike and List Members,
 
I have managed to locate many older issues of Railway and Engineering Review online, but not this one.
 
Anyone have any success turning this one up?
 
Claus Schlund
 
 
 

From: Schleigh Mike via Groups.Io
Sent: Wednesday, May 16, 2018 9:06 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] GN 40' Truss Rod Boxcars
 
Thank You Howard!
 
We will pursue this source.
 
Regards from Grove City, Penna.  Mike Schleigh
 
On Wednesday, May 16, 2018, 6:07:15 AM EDT, earlyrail <cascaderail@...> wrote:
 
 
Yes,
The Railway and Engineering Review, February 23, 1901, page 100
Howard Garner
 

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