Date   

Re: I assume the cars (and the poultry?) would have arrived via a carfloat?

 

What’s built up on the roof of the car to their right?


Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni


From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of "Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)" <claus@...>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Sunday, May 20, 2018 at 2:10 PM
To: STMFC <RealSTMFC@groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] I assume the cars (and the poultry?) would have arrived via a carfloat?

Hi List Members,
 
Among other interesting items on this great photo you will find two poultry cars...
 
http://www.railfan.net/lists/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-09-28-12/C1415.jpg
 
The location is Harlem Transfer. I assume the cars (and the poultry?) would have arrived via a carfloat?
 
Claus Schlund


I assume the cars (and the poultry?) would have arrived via a carfloat?

Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)
 

Hi List Members,
 
Among other interesting items on this great photo you will find two poultry cars...
 
 
The location is Harlem Transfer. I assume the cars (and the poultry?) would have arrived via a carfloat?
 
Claus Schlund
 
 


Re: Name that gondola end?

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Great shot for weathering a string of gon, Tim!

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tim O'Connor
Sent: Saturday, May 19, 2018 2:34 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Name that gondola end?

 


lol - yeah, odd, even, whatever. :-)

So it appears the cars were completely rebuilt after 1955! They received steel sides,
and probably new ends as well. This July 1959 photo (posted by Ted Culotta on Ebay)
shows the rebuilt cars. It would be very interesting to know whether any of them kept
their spiral ends.

Tim




Thanks for sharing the photo, Tim.  I have a pair of Shapeways ends that were looking for a place to be used.  I assume that you meant ODD numbers!
 
Steve Hile


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [ mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tim O'Connor
Sent: Friday, May 18, 2018 11:36 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Name that gondola end?


Call it a "spiral" end. It's been discussed before, a little bit. As John Barry
says, Soo Line had some - series 63801 to 64799, 498 even-numbered cars in 1940.
By 1950 there were still 493 cars. By 1955, 224 cars had been rebuilt with steel
floors, but there were still 257 cars as built. In 1959 only 8 original cars were
on the roster, but there were still 469 cars with steel floors! And I know it's
going past 1960, but in 1965 there were still 277 of these strange gondolas!

Kinda makes me wonder, why aren't these considered to be "signature" Soo Line cars?

Tim O'Connor



===========================


Most likely a Monon gon, but it could be a SOO line as they had some too.  The cars can be modeled with the Intermountain USRA gon and a Shapeways end.  We had a good discussion on a number of these in the Barriger collection several months back.
John Barry


===========================


Came across a photo of a freight yard, and one one of the tracks is the end of a gondola I hadn't seen before. I'm sharing it here so that others may see it, and so that some may be able to identify it, with one continuous indentation filling the end, like lines on a vinyl record.
....Mike


Re: Iowa Terminal/PRR gun flat

Tony Thompson
 

So they all say (g).
Tony 


On May 19, 2018, at 5:49 PM, Garth Groff <sarahsan@...> wrote:

Tony,

Ah, but it did happen on the Lasalle & Bureau County, post period I'm afraid.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿

On 5/19/18 7:58 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:
Story sure has the scent of an urban legend. Several railroads have stories suspiciously similar.

Tony Thompson 


On May 19, 2018, at 1:29 PM, Charles Peck <lnnrr152@...> wrote:

Garth, I certainly agree that the time frame seems shaky for the car to have
arrived with archbar trucks.  However, if I had a guilty conscience over a
stolen car, I would have removed trucks with PRR cast on them and
substituted something less obvious.
Chuck Peck 

On Sat, May 19, 2018 at 2:20 PM, Garth Groff <sarahsan@...> wrote:
Jim,

We discussed this story before, but a couple of thing bother me about it. The car is on archbar trucks. They were banned in interchange in 1941-42. And what would such a specialty car be doing in interchange to an Iowa shortline, unless perhaps these cars also ran in general service? While the story may be true, it does seem a bit dodgy.


Can any of our PRR mavens put a date on when these cars would have received cast frame trucks?

In any case, the car was there when my father visited the ITR. Does anyone know if it is still around?

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿


On 5/19/18 2:42 PM, Jim Mischke wrote:


There is more to this story.  With me present as a child about 1967, the Iowa Terminal chief mechanical officer told my father that the railroad had stolen the flat car.   Needing a flat car, when a PRR flat car came in interchange, they hid it out back in the weeds and forged the paperwork to indicate it had been returned empty to CGW.   Then they waited 10-15 years until the statute of limitations ran out, at which time they fetched it from the weeds and made it into a snowplow.  How is that for planning ahead?

During this interval, a PRR representative did drop by looking for the flat car, but seemed satisfied with the paperwork and left.





Re: Iowa Terminal/PRR gun flat

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Tony,

Ah, but it did happen on the Lasalle & Bureau County, post period I'm afraid.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿

On 5/19/18 7:58 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:

Story sure has the scent of an urban legend. Several railroads have stories suspiciously similar.

Tony Thompson 


On May 19, 2018, at 1:29 PM, Charles Peck <lnnrr152@...> wrote:

Garth, I certainly agree that the time frame seems shaky for the car to have
arrived with archbar trucks.  However, if I had a guilty conscience over a
stolen car, I would have removed trucks with PRR cast on them and
substituted something less obvious.
Chuck Peck 

On Sat, May 19, 2018 at 2:20 PM, Garth Groff <sarahsan@...> wrote:
Jim,

We discussed this story before, but a couple of thing bother me about it. The car is on archbar trucks. They were banned in interchange in 1941-42. And what would such a specialty car be doing in interchange to an Iowa shortline, unless perhaps these cars also ran in general service? While the story may be true, it does seem a bit dodgy.


Can any of our PRR mavens put a date on when these cars would have received cast frame trucks?

In any case, the car was there when my father visited the ITR. Does anyone know if it is still around?

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿


On 5/19/18 2:42 PM, Jim Mischke wrote:


There is more to this story.  With me present as a child about 1967, the Iowa Terminal chief mechanical officer told my father that the railroad had stolen the flat car.   Needing a flat car, when a PRR flat car came in interchange, they hid it out back in the weeds and forged the paperwork to indicate it had been returned empty to CGW.   Then they waited 10-15 years until the statute of limitations ran out, at which time they fetched it from the weeds and made it into a snowplow.  How is that for planning ahead?

During this interval, a PRR representative did drop by looking for the flat car, but seemed satisfied with the paperwork and left.





Re: Iowa Terminal/PRR gun flat

Tony Thompson
 

Story sure has the scent of an urban legend. Several railroads have stories suspiciously similar.

Tony Thompson 


On May 19, 2018, at 1:29 PM, Charles Peck <lnnrr152@...> wrote:

Garth, I certainly agree that the time frame seems shaky for the car to have
arrived with archbar trucks.  However, if I had a guilty conscience over a
stolen car, I would have removed trucks with PRR cast on them and
substituted something less obvious.
Chuck Peck 

On Sat, May 19, 2018 at 2:20 PM, Garth Groff <sarahsan@...> wrote:
Jim,

We discussed this story before, but a couple of thing bother me about it. The car is on archbar trucks. They were banned in interchange in 1941-42. And what would such a specialty car be doing in interchange to an Iowa shortline, unless perhaps these cars also ran in general service? While the story may be true, it does seem a bit dodgy.


Can any of our PRR mavens put a date on when these cars would have received cast frame trucks?

In any case, the car was there when my father visited the ITR. Does anyone know if it is still around?

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿


On 5/19/18 2:42 PM, Jim Mischke wrote:


There is more to this story.  With me present as a child about 1967, the Iowa Terminal chief mechanical officer told my father that the railroad had stolen the flat car.   Needing a flat car, when a PRR flat car came in interchange, they hid it out back in the weeds and forged the paperwork to indicate it had been returned empty to CGW.   Then they waited 10-15 years until the statute of limitations ran out, at which time they fetched it from the weeds and made it into a snowplow.  How is that for planning ahead?

During this interval, a PRR representative did drop by looking for the flat car, but seemed satisfied with the paperwork and left.




Re: Name that gondola end?

Bob Chapman
 

Ralph Brown writes:

Are those the Shapeways ends that Steve mentioned, or something else?


Ralph --

I bought the ends several years ago (7-8?) from Monon modeler Chad Boas, at the time a regular at the Naperville RPM meet. I'm guessing that Chad made them from a master; 3-D printing was still very much a novelty, given the timing. That said, I have no real knowledge whether there's a connection to the Shapeway product, or not. 


Regards,

Bob Chapman    


Re: Iowa Terminal/PRR gun flat

Benjamin Hom
 

I wrote:
"- Tracing D74604-F (Revised 2-6-1929), which superseded tracing D70003, still shows Class F22 and F23 cars equipped with Class 2E1F1 Arch Bar trucks, but by Revision H dated 3-17-1932, the Class 2E1F1 entry has been struck out and replaced by 2F-F1.

Checking the record of changes in Revision H, Class 2E1F1 was struck out in Revision G dated 12-16-1929.  So Arch Bar truck-equipped Class F22 and F23 flat cars would have had Crown trucks by December 1929.


Ben Hom


Re: Iowa Terminal/PRR gun flat

Benjamin Hom
 

Garth Groff wrote:
"We discussed this story before, but a couple of thing[s] bother me about it. The car is on archbar trucks. They were banned in interchange in 1941-42. And what would such a specialty car be doing in interchange to an Iowa shortline, unless perhaps these cars also ran in general service? While the story may be true, it does seem a bit dodgy.

Can any of our PRR mavens put a date on when these cars would have received cast frame trucks?"

Checking the PRR Truck Classification Tables posted on Rob Schoenberg's website reveals the following:

- Tracing D70003-B (Revised 1-18-1923) documents that Class F22 and F23 cars built before 3-16-1915 were equipped with Class 2E1F1 Arch Bar trucks, while cars built after 3-16-1915 were equipped with Class 2F-F1 Crown trucks.
http://prr.railfan.net/trucks/D70003-B.pdf

- Tracing D74604-F (Revised 2-6-1929), which superseded tracing D70003, still shows Class F22 and F23 cars equipped with Class 2E1F1 Arch Bar trucks, but by Revision H dated 3-17-1932, the Class 2E1F1 entry has been struck out and replaced by 2F-F1.

- There is no entry for Class 2E1F1 Arch Bar trucks in the next edition of the truck classification tables (Tracing E-98401).

So based on this information, archbar trucks would have been replaced by Crown trucks by March 1932.

I suspect this story was a nice piece of folklore told to entertain a child.


Ben Hom


Re: Name that gondola end?

Ralph W. Brown
 

Hi Bruce,
 
I had no idea, and I lived in Brooklyn until the Summer of 1948,  I remember streetcars, but not horse-drawn anything.  I guess we didn’t frequent the right parts of Brooklyn.
 
Pax,
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532
 
From: Bruce Smith
Sent: Saturday, May 19, 2018 3:52 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Name that gondola end?
 

Ralph,

 

Horse-power lasted well past WWII in some urban environments.  Referring to Producers Milk Co. in the city of Brooklyn, NY, "In 1952 there still were 20 horses on 18 daily milk wagon runs in addition to the fleet of retail trucks."

http://oldbrooklynhistory.org/gallery/

 

Regards

Bruce

Bruce Smith

O'Hare airport, headed home!

 


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Ralph W. Brown <rbrown51@...>
Sent: Saturday, May 19, 2018 2:42 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Name that gondola end?
 
Hi Mike,
 
Thanks for the background info.  There is a lot of interesting stuff in that photo besides the gon, including a horse-drawn wagon.  I would have thought they’d be gone from urban scenes by the mid-1920s.
 
Where did you find this beauty?
 
Pax,
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532
 
From: MDelvec952 via Groups.Io
Sent: Saturday, May 19, 2018 1:45 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Name that gondola end?
 
 
 
Beautiful model, Bob, thanks.  I must have missed the discussion on these ends, but glad to see the photo of the model. 
 
The freight yard is in Newark, NJ, on the Lackawanna early in 1926, accessed through the lower level of a double-deck drawbridge. The picture was taken due to an incident on the upper level of the bridge, so there aren't any other photos off the yard taken this day.  The upper level is still in daily service today on NJTransit.
 
                      ....Mike


-----Original Message-----

From: Bob Chapman <chapbob611@...>
To: main <main@realSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Sat, May 19, 2018 1:34 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Name that gondola end?

Mike --
 
Here's a model of the Monon gon. Chad Boas supplied the cast resin Spiral-Dreadnaught ends.
 
Regards,
Bob Chapman
 
 
Mike writes:
Came across a photo of a freight yard, and one one of the tracks is the end of a gondola I hadn't seen before. I'm sharing it here so that others may see it, and so that some may be able to identify it, with one continuous indentation filling the end, like lines on a vinyl record.
 


Re: Iowa Terminal/PRR gun flat

Charles Peck
 

Garth, I certainly agree that the time frame seems shaky for the car to have
arrived with archbar trucks.  However, if I had a guilty conscience over a
stolen car, I would have removed trucks with PRR cast on them and
substituted something less obvious.
Chuck Peck 

On Sat, May 19, 2018 at 2:20 PM, Garth Groff <sarahsan@...> wrote:
Jim,

We discussed this story before, but a couple of thing bother me about it. The car is on archbar trucks. They were banned in interchange in 1941-42. And what would such a specialty car be doing in interchange to an Iowa shortline, unless perhaps these cars also ran in general service? While the story may be true, it does seem a bit dodgy.


Can any of our PRR mavens put a date on when these cars would have received cast frame trucks?

In any case, the car was there when my father visited the ITR. Does anyone know if it is still around?

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿


On 5/19/18 2:42 PM, Jim Mischke wrote:


There is more to this story.  With me present as a child about 1967, the Iowa Terminal chief mechanical officer told my father that the railroad had stolen the flat car.   Needing a flat car, when a PRR flat car came in interchange, they hid it out back in the weeds and forged the paperwork to indicate it had been returned empty to CGW.   Then they waited 10-15 years until the statute of limitations ran out, at which time they fetched it from the weeds and made it into a snowplow.  How is that for planning ahead?

During this interval, a PRR representative did drop by looking for the flat car, but seemed satisfied with the paperwork and left.




Re: Iowa Terminal/PRR gun flat

hubert mask
 

Great story 

Hubert Mask 


On May 19, 2018, at 2:42 PM, Jim Mischke <jmischke@...> wrote:



There is more to this story.  With me present as a child about 1967, the Iowa Terminal chief mechanical officer told my father that the railroad had stolen the flat car.   Needing a flat car, when a PRR flat car came in interchange, they hid it out back in the weeds and forged the paperwork to indicate it had been returned empty to CGW.   Then they waited 10-15 years until the statute of limitations ran out, at which time they fetched it from the weeds and made it into a snowplow.  How is that for planning ahead?

During this interval, a PRR representative did drop by looking for the flat car, but seemed satisfied with the paperwork and left.


Re: Iowa Terminal/PRR gun flat

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Jim,

We discussed this story before, but a couple of thing bother me about it. The car is on archbar trucks. They were banned in interchange in 1941-42. And what would such a specialty car be doing in interchange to an Iowa shortline, unless perhaps these cars also ran in general service? While the story may be true, it does seem a bit dodgy.


Can any of our PRR mavens put a date on when these cars would have received cast frame trucks?

In any case, the car was there when my father visited the ITR. Does anyone know if it is still around?

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿


On 5/19/18 2:42 PM, Jim Mischke wrote:



There is more to this story.  With me present as a child about 1967, the Iowa Terminal chief mechanical officer told my father that the railroad had stolen the flat car.   Needing a flat car, when a PRR flat car came in interchange, they hid it out back in the weeds and forged the paperwork to indicate it had been returned empty to CGW.   Then they waited 10-15 years until the statute of limitations ran out, at which time they fetched it from the weeds and made it into a snowplow.  How is that for planning ahead?

During this interval, a PRR representative did drop by looking for the flat car, but seemed satisfied with the paperwork and left.



Re: Name that gondola end?

Bruce Smith
 

Ralph,


Horse-power lasted well past WWII in some urban environments.  Referring to Producers Milk Co. in the city of Brooklyn, NY, "In 1952 there still were 20 horses on 18 daily milk wagon runs in addition to the fleet of retail trucks."

http://oldbrooklynhistory.org/gallery/


Regards

Bruce

Bruce Smith

O'Hare airport, headed home!



From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Ralph W. Brown <rbrown51@...>
Sent: Saturday, May 19, 2018 2:42 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Name that gondola end?
 
Hi Mike,
 
Thanks for the background info.  There is a lot of interesting stuff in that photo besides the gon, including a horse-drawn wagon.  I would have thought they’d be gone from urban scenes by the mid-1920s.
 
Where did you find this beauty?
 
Pax,
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532
 
From: MDelvec952 via Groups.Io
Sent: Saturday, May 19, 2018 1:45 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Name that gondola end?
 
 
 
Beautiful model, Bob, thanks.  I must have missed the discussion on these ends, but glad to see the photo of the model. 
 
The freight yard is in Newark, NJ, on the Lackawanna early in 1926, accessed through the lower level of a double-deck drawbridge. The picture was taken due to an incident on the upper level of the bridge, so there aren't any other photos off the yard taken this day.  The upper level is still in daily service today on NJTransit.
 
                      ....Mike


-----Original Message-----
From: Bob Chapman <chapbob611@...>
To: main <main@realSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Sat, May 19, 2018 1:34 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Name that gondola end?

Mike --
 
Here's a model of the Monon gon. Chad Boas supplied the cast resin Spiral-Dreadnaught ends.
 
Regards,
Bob Chapman
 
 
Mike writes:
Came across a photo of a freight yard, and one one of the tracks is the end of a gondola I hadn't seen before. I'm sharing it here so that others may see it, and so that some may be able to identify it, with one continuous indentation filling the end, like lines on a vinyl record.
 


Re: Name that gondola end?

Ralph W. Brown
 

Hi Mike,
 
Thanks for the background info.  There is a lot of interesting stuff in that photo besides the gon, including a horse-drawn wagon.  I would have thought they’d be gone from urban scenes by the mid-1920s.
 
Where did you find this beauty?
 
Pax,
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532
 
From: MDelvec952 via Groups.Io
Sent: Saturday, May 19, 2018 1:45 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Name that gondola end?
 
 
 
Beautiful model, Bob, thanks.  I must have missed the discussion on these ends, but glad to see the photo of the model. 
 
The freight yard is in Newark, NJ, on the Lackawanna early in 1926, accessed through the lower level of a double-deck drawbridge. The picture was taken due to an incident on the upper level of the bridge, so there aren't any other photos off the yard taken this day.  The upper level is still in daily service today on NJTransit.
 
                      ....Mike


-----Original Message-----

From: Bob Chapman <chapbob611@...>
To: main <main@realSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Sat, May 19, 2018 1:34 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Name that gondola end?

Mike --
 
Here's a model of the Monon gon. Chad Boas supplied the cast resin Spiral-Dreadnaught ends.
 
Regards,
Bob Chapman
 
 
Mike writes:
Came across a photo of a freight yard, and one one of the tracks is the end of a gondola I hadn't seen before. I'm sharing it here so that others may see it, and so that some may be able to identify it, with one continuous indentation filling the end, like lines on a vinyl record.
 


Re: Iowa Terminal/PRR gun flat

Jim Mischke
 



There is more to this story.  With me present as a child about 1967, the Iowa Terminal chief mechanical officer told my father that the railroad had stolen the flat car.   Needing a flat car, when a PRR flat car came in interchange, they hid it out back in the weeds and forged the paperwork to indicate it had been returned empty to CGW.   Then they waited 10-15 years until the statute of limitations ran out, at which time they fetched it from the weeds and made it into a snowplow.  How is that for planning ahead?

During this interval, a PRR representative did drop by looking for the flat car, but seemed satisfied with the paperwork and left.


Re: Name that gondola end?

Tim O'Connor
 


lol - yeah, odd, even, whatever. :-)

So it appears the cars were completely rebuilt after 1955! They received steel sides,
and probably new ends as well. This July 1959 photo (posted by Ted Culotta on Ebay)
shows the rebuilt cars. It would be very interesting to know whether any of them kept
their spiral ends.

Tim



Thanks for sharing the photo, Tim.  I have a pair of Shapeways ends that were looking for a place to be used.  I assume that you meant ODD numbers!
 
Steve Hile


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [ mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tim O'Connor
Sent: Friday, May 18, 2018 11:36 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Name that gondola end?


Call it a "spiral" end. It's been discussed before, a little bit. As John Barry
says, Soo Line had some - series 63801 to 64799, 498 even-numbered cars in 1940.
By 1950 there were still 493 cars. By 1955, 224 cars had been rebuilt with steel
floors, but there were still 257 cars as built. In 1959 only 8 original cars were
on the roster, but there were still 469 cars with steel floors! And I know it's
going past 1960, but in 1965 there were still 277 of these strange gondolas!

Kinda makes me wonder, why aren't these considered to be "signature" Soo Line cars?

Tim O'Connor



===========================

Most likely a Monon gon, but it could be a SOO line as they had some too.  The cars can be modeled with the Intermountain USRA gon and a Shapeways end.  We had a good discussion on a number of these in the Barriger collection several months back.
John Barry

===========================

Came across a photo of a freight yard, and one one of the tracks is the end of a gondola I hadn't seen before. I'm sharing it here so that others may see it, and so that some may be able to identify it, with one continuous indentation filling the end, like lines on a vinyl record.
....Mike


Re: Name that gondola end?

MDelvec952
 



Beautiful model, Bob, thanks.  I must have missed the discussion on these ends, but glad to see the photo of the model. 

The freight yard is in Newark, NJ, on the Lackawanna early in 1926, accessed through the lower level of a double-deck drawbridge. The picture was taken due to an incident on the upper level of the bridge, so there aren't any other photos off the yard taken this day.  The upper level is still in daily service today on NJTransit.

                      ....Mike


-----Original Message-----
From: Bob Chapman <chapbob611@...>
To: main <main@realSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Sat, May 19, 2018 1:34 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Name that gondola end?

Mike --

Here's a model of the Monon gon. Chad Boas supplied the cast resin Spiral-Dreadnaught ends.

Regards,
Bob Chapman


Mike writes:
Came across a photo of a freight yard, and one one of the tracks is the end of a gondola I hadn't seen before. I'm sharing it here so that others may see it, and so that some may be able to identify it, with one continuous indentation filling the end, like lines on a vinyl record.


Re: Name that gondola end?

Ralph W. Brown
 

Hi Bob,
 
Nice job.  Are those the Shapeways ends that Steve mentioned, or something else?
 
Pax,
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532
 
From: Bob Chapman
Sent: Saturday, May 19, 2018 1:33 PM
To: main@realSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Name that gondola end?
 

Mike --

 

Here's a model of the Monon gon. Chad Boas supplied the cast resin Spiral-Dreadnaught ends.

 

Regards,

Bob Chapman

 

 

Mike writes:

Came across a photo of a freight yard, and one one of the tracks is the end of a gondola I hadn't seen before. I'm sharing it here so that others may see it, and so that some may be able to identify it, with one continuous indentation filling the end, like lines on a vinyl record.


Re: Name that gondola end?

Bob Chapman
 

Mike --


Here's a model of the Monon gon. Chad Boas supplied the cast resin Spiral-Dreadnaught ends.


Regards,

Bob Chapman



Mike writes:

Came across a photo of a freight yard, and one one of the tracks is the end of a gondola I hadn't seen before. I'm sharing it here so that others may see it, and so that some may be able to identify it, with one continuous indentation filling the end, like lines on a vinyl record.

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