Date   

Re: Masking over Archer rivets

James E Kubanick
 

My experience is identical to that which Al Brown describes. I use Scalcoat and Tamiya tape, also.

Jim Kubanick
Morgantown WV


On Monday, August 6, 2018 3:27 PM, O Fenton Wells <srrfan1401@...> wrote:


I have another tale about Archer rivets.  I added them to a boxcar.  First I sprayed the car with clear gloss.  Applied the rivets and it was a problem because the gloss hadn't dried completely.  But I was in a hurry and kept going.  After a week I started to proceed with more detailing of the car and noticed that the gloss had still not dried and I was leaving my fingerprints all over the sides.  WOWZER not good.  So I decided to strip it with Scale Coat stripper.  I have plenty of Archer rivets so I figured they would go with the stripper. I don't immerse, I lay the car on news print and paint the stripper to one side.  Let it sit then use a tooth brush and wash the paint off at the deep sink.   I use less stripper that way and it works just as well.  On some applications I have to do it 2 or 3 times a side.  
After I got the clear gloss off, the Archer Rivets were still there....who knew.
Not saying this would work every time but it did this time.
Fenton Wells

On Mon, Aug 6, 2018 at 3:17 PM, StephenK <thekays100@...> wrote:
I have used another method for masking small areas (headlight lenses, for example) that are difficult to mask.   I use dishwashing liquid (the kind for the sink, not the machine).   This assumes a non-wood model.   Paint a layer of liquid over the area and let dry.  I usually put 2-3 coats on.   Paint, then wash off after the paint dries.   Note that I have never used this on Archer Rivets.   (I have never used Archer rivets....).  It's worth a try on a sample piece of plastic.

Steve Kay



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...



Source

Jared Harper
 

At Collinsville I purchased a couple of large crates for a load in an open top car.  The two are  fine for a 50' flat car or gondola.  However, I would like to get a couple of more so I can use three for a load in  a mill gondola.  Unfortunately I do not remember the name of the vendor but he had a variety of load items.  Can anyone direct me to this vendor?

Thanks.

Jared Harper
Athens, GA


Re: Hog Fuel

Mark Pierce <marcoperforar@...>
 

"Hog" was derived from the Norwegian word "hogde": meaning "chopped" in English.


Re: The Twelfth St. Louis Railroad Prototype Modeler's Meet

golden1014
 

Attendance was great but I think all the RPMs are up in attendance.  Naperville is, Cocoa's holding strong, the Minneapolis event is growing, and there are other start-ups.  RPM works.  

There were a lot of new products and announcements there.  The Kadee parts were cool.  I picked up a lot of parts from Yarmouth and Speedwitch, and the new Speedwitch cars coming are very cool.

John Golden
Jetlag, Germany


Re: Masking over Archer rivets

O Fenton Wells
 

I have another tale about Archer rivets.  I added them to a boxcar.  First I sprayed the car with clear gloss.  Applied the rivets and it was a problem because the gloss hadn't dried completely.  But I was in a hurry and kept going.  After a week I started to proceed with more detailing of the car and noticed that the gloss had still not dried and I was leaving my fingerprints all over the sides.  WOWZER not good.  So I decided to strip it with Scale Coat stripper.  I have plenty of Archer rivets so I figured they would go with the stripper. I don't immerse, I lay the car on news print and paint the stripper to one side.  Let it sit then use a tooth brush and wash the paint off at the deep sink.   I use less stripper that way and it works just as well.  On some applications I have to do it 2 or 3 times a side.  
After I got the clear gloss off, the Archer Rivets were still there....who knew.
Not saying this would work every time but it did this time.
Fenton Wells

On Mon, Aug 6, 2018 at 3:17 PM, StephenK <thekays100@...> wrote:
I have used another method for masking small areas (headlight lenses, for example) that are difficult to mask.   I use dishwashing liquid (the kind for the sink, not the machine).   This assumes a non-wood model.   Paint a layer of liquid over the area and let dry.  I usually put 2-3 coats on.   Paint, then wash off after the paint dries.   Note that I have never used this on Archer Rivets.   (I have never used Archer rivets....).  It's worth a try on a sample piece of plastic.

Steve Kay




--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Georgia railroad boxcars

Eric Hansmann
 

Jim Brewer shares his work on a pair of Georgia Railroad rebuilt boxcars. It's the latest on the Resin Car Works blog.

http://blog.resincarworks.com/georgia-railroad-rebuilt-boxcars/



Eric Hansmann
RCW web guy


Re: Masking over Archer rivets

StephenK
 

I have used another method for masking small areas (headlight lenses, for example) that are difficult to mask.   I use dishwashing liquid (the kind for the sink, not the machine).   This assumes a non-wood model.   Paint a layer of liquid over the area and let dry.  I usually put 2-3 coats on.   Paint, then wash off after the paint dries.   Note that I have never used this on Archer Rivets.   (I have never used Archer rivets....).  It's worth a try on a sample piece of plastic.

Steve Kay


Re: Masking over Archer rivets

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 


Hi Al,
 
Thanks for the info on this useful result. I appreciate the level of detail you put into your message, this allows me to know the specific process that is proven to work.
 
Claus Schlund
 

----- Original Message -----
From: al_brown03
Sent: Sunday, August 05, 2018 7:07 PM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Masking over Archer rivets

Painted a week later than planned. Encouraged by Craig's result, I applied Archers to bare plastic, gloss-coated over them, painted over the gloss-coat. The paint was Scalecoat II; I let it cure for a week. Masked over the paint with Tamiya tape, and painted a second color. Unmasked, and the Archers were A-O-K; they were under the tape about three hours. 

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


Re: Masking over Archer rivets

al_brown03
 

Painted a week later than planned. Encouraged by Craig's result, I applied Archers to bare plastic, gloss-coated over them, painted over the gloss-coat. The paint was Scalecoat II; I let it cure for a week. Masked over the paint with Tamiya tape, and painted a second color. Unmasked, and the Archers were A-O-K; they were under the tape about three hours. 

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


Re: Intermountain 40899

pennsylvania1954
 

Doug--We appreciate your coming on here and representing Intermountain with an encouraging heads-up.

Steve Hoxie
Pensacola FL


Re: Intermountain 40899

Bill Welch
 

A couple of thoughts Doug, the first of which I mentioned to Gene F. at the Collinsville RPM: Please keep Undecorated kits in stock. I realize this is a small part of the market but people do still like modify, paint, decal and I think this strategy buys all sorts of goodwill for no cost.

Number Two: Please consider cutting the body tooling for the 10-ft IH car for cars with 7-ft and 8-foot doors. This would enlarge the number of factory painted and assembled models you could release and create more fodder for those that like to "roll their own."

Respectfully,
Bill Welch


Re: Universal Hand Brake Drawings

Gene Green <genegreen1942@...>
 

EXACTLY the information needed to answer the question.  I have forwarded photos and a drawing to the gentleman.  If anyone else is also interested in same please advise OFF LIST to genegreen1942 at yahoo dot com.
Gene Green


Re: brake wheel terminology (was PTC or STC?)

Steve and Barb Hile
 

Sorry for the typo!  It should have read LEVER on a stick.  I agree with and use the below definitions.
 
Steve Hile



From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tim O'Connor
Sent: Saturday, August 04, 2018 12:09 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] brake wheel terminology (was PTC or STC?)


FYI - terminology note -

Railroads (Car Builder's Cyclopedia) call handbrakes with gear housings on the ends of box cars
VERTICAL.

They refer to hand brakes mounted on posts on tank cars and flat cars as
HORIZONTAL .

Obviously the terms apply to the orientation of the plane of the hand brake wheel relative to the ground.

Reference: 19th Car Builder's Cyclopedia, page 919, Superior Hand Brake Company advertisement



However, we can note that the various PTC high walkway cars shown in the ORER entries that David Thompson cites all use horizontal brake wheels, while the two OCGX cars in the book photo demonstrate the use of a level hand brake on a "stick" that was pretty common on early STC cars.  The tall side facing ladder does match the PTC entries.

Thanks,
Steve Hile


Re: New Company—Arrowhead: New Hopper Model

Jon Miller <atsfus@...>
 

On 8/3/2018 4:36 PM, Matthew Metoyer wrote:
Too new - a close-up of the model shows built March 1960.

    Looks like a nice car, to bad it's out of my era!

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
SPROG User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


brake wheel terminology (was PTC or STC?)

Tim O'Connor
 


FYI - terminology note -

Railroads (Car Builder's Cyclopedia) call handbrakes with gear housings on the ends of box cars
VERTICAL.

They refer to hand brakes mounted on posts on tank cars and flat cars as
HORIZONTAL .

Obviously the terms apply to the orientation of the plane of the hand brake wheel relative to the ground.

Reference: 19th Car Builder's Cyclopedia, page 919, Superior Hand Brake Company advertisement



However, we can note that the various PTC high walkway cars shown in the ORER entries that David Thompson cites all use horizontal brake wheels, while the two OCGX cars in the book photo demonstrate the use of a level hand brake on a "stick" that was pretty common on early STC cars.  The tall side facing ladder does match the PTC entries.

Thanks,
Steve Hile


Re: New Company—Arrowhead: New Hopper Model

Matthew Metoyer
 

Too new - a close-up of the model shows built March 1960.

Matthew Metoyer

On Fri, Aug 3, 2018 at 4:27 PM Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:
Not sure if this new model fits our time frame here because if it came after October 1955 it does not exist in my little universe but just in case: https://arrowheadmodels.com./collections/shop

Bill Welch


Re: PRR H30

csxt5555
 

The body is most 18 ga steel. There are a few pieces that are 16 gauge.

Kevin

On Aug 4, 2018, at 12:01 PM, vapeurchapelon <j.markwart@gmx.net> wrote:

Very impressive! Thanks for sharing. Which materials do you use for body and frame parts?

Many greetings

Johannes

Gesendet: Samstag, 04. August 2018 um 01:33 Uhr
Von: "csxt5555 via Groups.Io" <csxt5555=yahoo.com@groups.io>
An: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Betreff: [RealSTMFC] PRR H30

I though I’d share some pics of the H30 kit build. I did 10 of these kits in 1.5 scale. I currently building one as well but I’m not quite this far along. Here are pics from a customer as his begins to take shape.





Re: PRR H30

vapeurchapelon
 

Very impressive! Thanks for sharing. Which materials do you use for body and frame parts?

Many greetings

Johannes

Gesendet: Samstag, 04. August 2018 um 01:33 Uhr
Von: "csxt5555 via Groups.Io" <csxt5555=yahoo.com@groups.io>
An: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Betreff: [RealSTMFC] PRR H30

I though I’d share some pics of the H30 kit build. I did 10 of these kits in 1.5 scale. I currently building one as well but I’m not quite this far along. Here are pics from a customer as his begins to take shape.




Re: PTC or STC?

Steve and Barb Hile
 

Brian,
 
Thanks for the updated information.  I am sorry that we did not credit your photo properly.
 
The relationship between Standard Car Construction Company (Standard Tank Car Company) and Pennsylvania Tank Car Company must have pretty convoluted, but symbiotic, at least initially.
 
Any MCB Class III tank cars (built after May 1917) had to have the lower running boards, so STC could have only built a small number of high walkway cars in the short period of time between its founding and the Class III requirements beginning.
 
However, we can note that the various PTC high walkway cars shown in the ORER entries that David Thompson cites all use horizontal brake wheels, while the two OCGX cars in the book photo demonstrate the use of a level hand brake on a "stick" that was pretty common on early STC cars.  The tall side facing ladder does match the PTC entries.
 
So, based on Brian's better photo, the caption should be updated to read built in 1916, which makes it possible that it was built by STC or PTC.
 
I will begin an errata sheet for the book and look forward to other corrections and assistance.
 
Thanks,
Steve Hile



From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of brianleppert@...
Sent: Friday, August 03, 2018 6:34 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] PTC or STC?

This discussion is about a photo on page 135 in Steve Hile's new book "UTLX Steam Era Tank Cars".  Shown are two high platform tank cars owned by The Ohio Cities Gas Company.  Part of the caption reads "built by Standard Tank Car Company in 1914".

I own the original photograph.  The correct built date is July 1916.  The cars were weighed at "SHRN 7 16".  Stenciled on the center frame, just to the left of the reporting marks is "REPAIRED & PAINTED BY PEOPLES TK. LINE CO AT COFFEYVILE KANS."  There is no mention anywhere of who built the car, maybe because of the repaint.  Attached is a detail of OCGX 5255.

Other dates stenciled on the underframe seem to read  "repacked 7 16 1919" and on the air reservoir "4-19"  On the back of the print is stamped "RECEIVED JUL 30 1919 Traffic Department".  Geez, the print is 99 years old.

Is David claiming that ALL the high-walkway tank cars with Standard Tank Car look-alike underframes were actually built by Pennsylvania Tank Car?

Brian Leppert
Carson City, NV


Re: Universal Hand Brake Drawings

mark_landgraf
 

usually the freight car diagram book tells whose hand brake equipment that they used

then you'll have to go by date, to figure out which models were available

Mark


On Friday, August 3, 2018, 10:12:11 PM EDT, Tim Meyer <floridatenwheeler@...> wrote:


Hi Gene

I do not know. It was used on the 42-foot gondolas built for the CNW by GATC in 1956. My paper work has a number 1975-2195 Non-Spin if that means anything.

Thanks

Tim Meyer

floridatenwheeler at verizon dot net

Virus-free. www.avast.com

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