Date   
Securing Steam Era Excavator to Flat Car

Kemal Mumcu
 

Hi, I'm working on a Red Caboose flat with a Woodland Scenics Insley Excavator for a load. I'm looking for guidance on how to secure the thing down to the flat car. Does anyone have a diagram perhaps of the best way to position the excavator? I've looked at a lot of pictures online and there doesn't seem to be a consensus on how to position the arm; tucked under the machine or stretched out straight?

Colin Meikle

Re: Carmer uncoupling levers for C&O hopper

Bruce Smith
 

Andy,


Alas, I do not have that book.  Anyone with a photo, that would be most appreciated.  The series is described in the F&C instructions as 73000-74999 and 75000-76999 but the photos (poor quality) in the instructions indicate that there should be a 1 in front of that (so 173000-176999).


Regards

Bruce​



From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Andy Cich <ajc5150@...>
Sent: Friday, August 10, 2018 5:18 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io; RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Carmer uncoupling levers for C&O hopper
 

Bruce,

 

Do you have access to the book Coal Cars: The First Three Hundred Years? There is a photo of C&O 176636 on page 330. Unfortunately, the angle of the photo is about the same as the angle of the model photo on F&C’s website. Some of the Carmer lever is visible. Perhaps there is enough there to compare to the Yarmouth offerings.

 

Andy Cich

 

 

 

 

Folks,

 

I'm nearing completion on an F&C C&O triple bay panel side 70 ton hopper. The prototype had Carmer uncoupling levers and these are provided in the kit as somewhat heavy and plain resin castings. However, having recently come to a higher plane of consciousness regarding the diversity of Carmer levers (curse you, Pierre Oliver!) I wonder what specific levers this car had. I can fudge it, but I'd like to know, and the photos with the kit are not sufficient to identify the operating and lifting levers on this car. 

 

Regards,

Bruce

 

Bruce Smith

Auburn Al

Re: Carmer uncoupling levers for C&O hopper

Andy Cich
 

Bruce,

 

Do you have access to the book Coal Cars: The First Three Hundred Years? There is a photo of C&O 176636 on page 330. Unfortunately, the angle of the photo is about the same as the angle of the model photo on F&C’s website. Some of the Carmer lever is visible. Perhaps there is enough there to compare to the Yarmouth offerings.

 

Andy Cich

 

 

 

 

Folks,

 

I'm nearing completion on an F&C C&O triple bay panel side 70 ton hopper. The prototype had Carmer uncoupling levers and these are provided in the kit as somewhat heavy and plain resin castings. However, having recently come to a higher plane of consciousness regarding the diversity of Carmer levers (curse you, Pierre Oliver!) I wonder what specific levers this car had. I can fudge it, but I'd like to know, and the photos with the kit are not sufficient to identify the operating and lifting levers on this car. 

 

Regards,

Bruce

 

Bruce Smith

Auburn Al

_._,_._,_

Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] PRR freight car books

Richard Townsend
 

Box cars?

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Gatwood, Elden J SAD <elden.j.gatwood@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>; realstmfc <realstmfc@groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Aug 10, 2018 5:26 am
Subject: Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] PRR freight car books

Glad you are enjoying them, Richard!

I am working on the next book.

Elden Gatwood


Re: M&StL 24562 4C-XM-1 Box Car

Bill Welch
 

I love Single Sheathed boxcars and the  Granger RR"s examples like this are especially appealing. Well done commentary on your appealing build Lester.

Bill Welch

M&StL 24562 4C-XM-1 Box Car

Lester Breuer
 

I have built, painted and lettered Sunshine Models , Minneapolis & St. Louis 24562, 4C-XM-1 Pratt truss Box Car, flat resin kit 91.1.   I have posted photos and writeup including history on my blog I started to share photos and writeup on Freight Cars, etc. of modeling projects on my Minneapolis & Northland Railroad Company.   If you are interested in viewing additional photos take a look at the following:
 
 
Lester Breuer

Re: Carmer uncoupling levers for C&O hopper

Bruce Smith
 

Nelson,

I should have mentioned that resource as one I have close at hand.  These being neither PRR nor USRA cars (although the original Hocking Valley cars that were rebuilt into these cars were “an unbuilt USRA design”) and so no, there is no useful information with respect to these cars presented there.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."




On Aug 10, 2018, at 2:02 PM, Nelson Moyer <npmoyer@...> wrote:

Did you download the three PDFs from the YMW web site? Two are usage guides for PRR and USRA cars, and the other is abending guide with dimensional drawings that you may be able to match to your car.
 
Nelson Moyer
 
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bruce Smith
Sent: Friday, August 10, 2018 1:57 PM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Carmer uncoupling levers for C&O hopper
 
Folks,
 
I'm nearing completion on an F&C C&O triple bay panel side 70 ton hopper. The prototype had Carmer uncoupling levers and these are provided in the kit as somewhat heavy and plain resin castings. However, having recently come to a higher plane of consciousness regarding the diversity of Carmer levers (curse you, Pierre Oliver!) I wonder what specific levers this car had. I can fudge it, but I'd like to know, and the photos with the kit are not sufficient to identify the operating and lifting levers on this car. 
 
Regards,
Bruce
 
Bruce Smith
Auburn Al


Re: Hog Fuel

Nolan Hinshaw
 

On Aug 9, 2018, at 2:54 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:

Dan Mitchell wrote:

"Hog fuel” however is a bit more than the modern term “wood chips” would imply. The term can include large chunks, up to what we now call cordwood. The larger pieces were commonly used to fuel donkey-engine winches and such in the woods. Cars dedicated to such large-chunk service were also sometimes called “block cars”, a term which can have different meanings in other contexts.
Can't speak for other railroads, but on the SP and NWP, a "block car" was for shipping the blocks that were later split into shingles or shakes.
One term in use in Central and Northern California redwood forests seems to have been "shingle bolts", at least in Santa Cruz County. Rick Hamman's _California Central Coast Railroads_ uses it, as did an article on the Molino Timber Company (30" gauge ridge-runner uphill from Aptos, CA) in, I think, "Western Railroader".
--
Nolan Hinshaw, San Francisco
Old Age is not for Sissies: the mental index is sub-optimally organized

Re: Carmer uncoupling levers for C&O hopper

Nelson Moyer
 

Did you download the three PDFs from the YMW web site? Two are usage guides for PRR and USRA cars, and the other is abending guide with dimensional drawings that you may be able to match to your car.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bruce Smith
Sent: Friday, August 10, 2018 1:57 PM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Carmer uncoupling levers for C&O hopper

 

Folks,

 

I'm nearing completion on an F&C C&O triple bay panel side 70 ton hopper. The prototype had Carmer uncoupling levers and these are provided in the kit as somewhat heavy and plain resin castings. However, having recently come to a higher plane of consciousness regarding the diversity of Carmer levers (curse you, Pierre Oliver!) I wonder what specific levers this car had. I can fudge it, but I'd like to know, and the photos with the kit are not sufficient to identify the operating and lifting levers on this car. 

 

Regards,

Bruce

 

Bruce Smith

Auburn Al

Carmer uncoupling levers for C&O hopper

Bruce Smith
 

Folks,


I'm nearing completion on an F&C C&O triple bay panel side 70 ton hopper. The prototype had Carmer uncoupling levers and these are provided in the kit as somewhat heavy and plain resin castings. However, having recently come to a higher plane of consciousness regarding the diversity of Carmer levers (curse you, Pierre Oliver!) I wonder what specific levers this car had. I can fudge it, but I'd like to know, and the photos with the kit are not sufficient to identify the operating and lifting levers on this car. 


Regards,

Bruce


Bruce Smith

Auburn Al

Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] PRR freight car books

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Glad you are enjoying them, Richard!

I am working on the next book.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Richard Townsend via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, August 9, 2018 3:32 PM
To: realstmfc@groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] PRR freight car books

I just bought the PRRT&HS books on flat cars and gondolas by Eldon Gatwood and Al Buchan. They are excellent books, and very reasonably priced. I heartily recommend them.

And I really want to say that the service was outstanding. I had them within just a few days of ordering. That's wonderful customer service.


Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR

RealSTMFC Rules

Mikebrock
 

Guys,

Recently there have been messages sent to the RealSTMFC that are out of scope. Therefore I am listing the group’s rules:

“The objectives

include the sharing of

information about North American, standard gauge railroad freight cars in the period 1900-1960 inclusive including their operation, distribution and the various techniques of building models of them. Discussions about the cargos of freight cars are permitted but only as they are directly associated with freight cars. Emphasis is to be placed on the study of the prototype with a goal of producing models of them with as great a degree of accuracy as possible. It should be noted that discussions by the group's members includes questions and answers regarding the group's subject. However, it should also be noted that the group is not to be considered necessarily as a library with its members prepared to respond to questions or acting as sources for information. Such responses are entirely voluntary and at no time is any group member obligated to respond to a request for information.

In fact, the group is not a good vehicle to transmit large amounts of information. The group is a good vehicle, however, to provide guidance as to where a member might find information.

 

Announcements about prototype modeling events are within scope but such announcements will be made no sooner than 3 months prior to the event.

 

Personal attacks about other members, manufacturers or prototype modeling events is expressly prohibited and may result in expulsion from the group. Members are expected to conduct themselves in a gentlemanly manner. Personal attacks on anyone including non members is not permitted.

 

Members are permitted to criticize or praise manufacturer's products free from criticism from other members. Criticism of a manufacturer's business practices is, however, not within the scope of the group.

 

ALL SUBJECTS OTHER THAN THOSE DIRECTLY ASSOCIATED WITH STEAM ERA FREIGHT CARS ARE PROHIBITED FROM MEMBER MESSAGES. Thus, all admin, security, or "policing" functions will be conducted only by myself or my representatives. Warnings about virus activity is strictly prohibited. Threads or subjects may be terminated only by myself or my representatives. When threads/subjects are terminated, members are expected to avoid sending messages associated with such threads/subjects.

 

All references to politics or political views are prohibited.

 

 

Placing photos in the file space involves issues associated with copyright and property rights. Members are allowed to upload photos into the file and/or photo spaces but only those photos that the members took themselves or those for which they have permission from the photo seller or other source to present on the internet for public consumption. Members are expected to obtain by themselves the necessary permissions. Failure to do so could result in the member being excluded from using the file and photo spaces. All photos placed in the file space are for personal use only by members of the STMFC and any rights for other usage must be negotiated with the party holding rights to the photo's usage. Photos placed in the STMFC file space must include in the description the source of the photo. The STMFPH is an associated group used to provide additional storage space and the same conditions apply to photo activity in that group.

 

Announcements of steam era frt car related items for sell are permitted BUT actual lists of items should be made available from the seller upon request rather than in the message. Announcements of such sells should be kept at a minimum. The primary objective of the group is to exchange information concerning the subject.

 

Messages regarding the selling of products associated with freight cars as part of a commercial enterprise must be sent during the period of noon Friday EST and Sunday midnight EST.

Each seller is allowed one message unless a correction is needed. Seller messages MUST include OFF GROUP addresses for replies. Replies by members to seller messages MUST be OFF GROUP.

Selling messages MUST include a statement that replies MUST be OFF GROUP and must include an Email address to which responders can reply to. This address should use the term "AT" instead of the "@" sign to ensure that the address is not edited by Yahoo. The reply must be sent to the email address including the "@" sign and NOT to the STMFC.

 

Repliers are free to use any reply technique as long as it replies to the message writer's email address and not that of the STMFC.

 

Members must sign messages with their full names. If the member's address IS their full name exactly [ to the left of an @ sign ] or simply their full name, that is acceptable as a signature.

 

Members may at any time bring any matter relating to the STMFC to me privately for consideration.

 

I hope you enjoy participating in discussions with the group. The study of frt cars and the modeling of them are ongoing processes and while pursuing them remember that no question or observation is unimportant or "dumb".”

 

Mike Brock

STMFC Owner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Re: SEEKING HELP ON WABASH OB AUTO CARS

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

HI Johannes:

Please contact me off list for a long story. Your e-mail seems to hae gone moissing frpom my computor.

BillPardie

On Aug 9, 2018, at 12:05 PM, vapeurchapelon <j.markwart@...> wrote:

Did this posting ever get a reply? At least I didn't see any.
Unfortunately I can't help with Bills original questions, but please allow another one on these cars: -the OMI model only has 8 roof walk supports - the 6 center supports are only on every second roof rib. Is THAT accurate?

Many thanks

Johannes

Gesendet: Montag, 18. Juni 2018 um 00:02 Uhr
Von: "WILLIAM PARDIE" <PARDIEW001@...>
An: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Betreff: [RealSTMFC] SEEKING HELP ON WABASH OB AUTO CARS


I have two of Overland's models of the Wabash OB auto cars. I have a fair amount of information on these cars, however, I am a bit confused as to the layout of the underframe components. f hope that someone might have a drawing of the underframe of these cars.

Car #145478 - This is the steel rebuild of the 45400- 45999 series cars. When rebuilt to steel the number 1 was added to the car number. The Z bracing on the sides wer retained.There is a good article containing drawings of this car in the December 1980 Mainline Modeler. Regretfully this does not have a a drawing of the underbody. The drawing shows that the heavy crossmember are locateed on the door posts on the left side of the car facing the brake wheel (as on th model). This places one in between the door and a half and the full sized door on the opposite side and the other at the bottom of the first verticle Z brace. There are not any other crossmenbefrs on the model. This seems to be a rather unusual arrangement.

Car #76044 - This car was rebuilt from the 4600 series auto carsinto a car with 6” doors while retaining the wood siding. I would guess that the original underframe was retained. This again makes for a rather assemetrical underframe.

I hope that somone might help me to solve my dilemma. It would seem that you would just add cross braces at the bottom of the remaining side S braces. I would like to verify this before making any changes.

Thanks in advance for any help:

Bill Pardie



Re: Hog Fuel

David Soderblom
 

“Block car” was, for example, the term used by West Side Lumber for their modified flats that carried sawmill chunk she back into the woods as fuel for donkey engines and such.

Re: Hog Fuel

Daniel A. Mitchell
 

We’re getting off topic, but it can also be a small flatcar with a huge tackle-block mounted on it, and used as the drop-car on a logging railroad’s incline. Loaded log-cars were coupled to it, and sent down the incline.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Aug 9, 2018, at 5:54 PM, Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:

Dan Mitchell wrote:

"Hog fuel” however is a bit more than the modern term “wood chips” would imply. The term can include large chunks, up to what we now call cordwood. The larger pieces were commonly used to fuel donkey-engine winches and such in the woods. Cars dedicated to such large-chunk service were also sometimes called “block cars”, a term which can have different meanings in other contexts.

  Can't speak for other railroads, but on the SP and NWP, a "block car" was for shipping the blocks that were later split into shingles or shakes.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: SEEKING HELP ON WABASH OB AUTO CARS

vapeurchapelon
 

Did this posting ever get a reply? At least I didn't see any.
Unfortunately I can't help with Bills original questions, but please allow another one on these cars: -the OMI model only has 8 roof walk supports - the 6 center supports are only on every second roof rib. Is THAT accurate?

Many thanks

Johannes

Gesendet: Montag, 18. Juni 2018 um 00:02 Uhr
Von: "WILLIAM PARDIE" <PARDIEW001@...>
An: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Betreff: [RealSTMFC] SEEKING HELP ON WABASH OB AUTO CARS


I have two of Overland's models of the Wabash OB auto cars. I have a fair amount of information on these cars, however, I am a bit confused as to the layout of the underframe components. f hope that someone might have a drawing of the underframe of these cars.

Car #145478 - This is the steel rebuild of the 45400- 45999 series cars. When rebuilt to steel the number 1 was added to the car number. The Z bracing on the sides wer retained.There is a good article containing drawings of this car in the December 1980 Mainline Modeler. Regretfully this does not have a a drawing of the underbody. The drawing shows that the heavy crossmember are locateed on the door posts on the left side of the car facing the brake wheel (as on th model). This places one in between the door and a half and the full sized door on the opposite side and the other at the bottom of the first verticle Z brace. There are not any other crossmenbefrs on the model. This seems to be a rather unusual arrangement.

Car #76044 - This car was rebuilt from the 4600 series auto carsinto a car with 6” doors while retaining the wood siding. I would guess that the original underframe was retained. This again makes for a rather assemetrical underframe.

I hope that somone might help me to solve my dilemma. It would seem that you would just add cross braces at the bottom of the remaining side S braces. I would like to verify this before making any changes.

Thanks in advance for any help:

Bill Pardie


Re: Hog Fuel

Tony Thompson
 

Dan Mitchell wrote:

"Hog fuel” however is a bit more than the modern term “wood chips” would imply. The term can include large chunks, up to what we now call cordwood. The larger pieces were commonly used to fuel donkey-engine winches and such in the woods. Cars dedicated to such large-chunk service were also sometimes called “block cars”, a term which can have different meanings in other contexts.

  Can't speak for other railroads, but on the SP and NWP, a "block car" was for shipping the blocks that were later split into shingles or shakes.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





PRR freight car books

Richard Townsend
 

I just bought the PRRT&HS books on flat cars and gondolas by Eldon Gatwood and Al Buchan. They are excellent books, and very reasonably priced. I heartily recommend them. 

And I really want to say that the service was outstanding. I had them within just a few days of ordering. That's wonderful customer service.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR

Re: AB Triple Valve Drawings

Tim Meyer
 

Thanks Brian. I found a great drawing of the air reservoir. But I am still looking for a better drawing of the AB valve.

Thanks

Tim Meyer 

Re: Hog Fuel

Daniel A. Mitchell
 

Agreed, and the discussions on duck/duct tape is off topic.

"Hog fuel” however is a bit more than the modern term “wood chips” would imply. The term can include large chunks, up to what we now call cordwood. The larger pieces were commonly used to fuel donkey-engine winches and such in the woods. Cars dedicated to such large-chunk service were also sometimes called “block cars”, a term which can have different meanings in other contexts.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Aug 9, 2018, at 12:48 PM, Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:

What does this have to do w/freight cars, supposedly the subject of this group?!

     The subject relates to the term used for wood chips in our era. The digression into duct tape is just one of those happy little excursions we take from time to time.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history