Date   

Re: Stand-off End Straps on GN Truss Rod Boxcar

Robert kirkham
 

Nice work Bill.  I guess the fillet behind the brace at the corner – combined with the near wire grabs – will make the model robust enough for handling carefully. 

 

The prototype configuration is kind of interesting – makes me wonder why the retainer line would have that complicated bend rather than run up the end in the clearance behind the brace?

 

Rob Kirkham

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bill Welch
Sent: Saturday, August 25, 2018 10:35 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Stand-off End Straps on GN Truss Rod Boxcar

 

Stand-off details like ladders and grabs have become the norm in creating scale models of freight cars and I wanted to take it another step and have some Stand-off Straps" on my GN truss rod boxcar ends. Before assembling the ends and sides I carefully removed the molded-on straps on the ends and mostly did a clean job w/a minimum gouges and then re-scribed the wood sheathing joints. When I was happy with how things looked I used a sanding sponge to give the ends a finished appearance. Recently I cut some 0.005 styrene sheet into strips wide enough to match the straps on the sides of the car and from these strips cut some small squares. I then used CA to glue two of the squares onto the end posts where the ends straps pass over these posts and used Tamiya Super Thin to glue the straps in place centered on the end. By having a styrene-to-styrene joint it enabled me to make slight adjustment if necessary to make sure the straps was square and level. I let the fast working Tamiya cure for a few minutes and then pulled gently on one end of each strap and pressed it down on the corner at the same time making it taught with sharp bend at each corner. I secured each corner with a small amount of CA so it would set up quickly and then came back with a bent piece of 0.010 wire to wick CA under each corner of the end to create a fillet of CA so when dry this slightly elevated area would have a hard base. I allowed all of this to sit overnight and the next morning trimmed of the excess styrene w/a fresh Single Edge Razor Blade and used rivets harvested from an Athearn gondola to create the bolt heads that secure the strapping on the prototype.

Bill Welch

 


Re: Semi trailers (was: Sunshine Kit Question)

Peter Ness
 

Here’s the NH trailer loading diagram published in a Railway Age article in 1953 or ’54 clearly showing the max trailer width of 8’ and the tie-down points for trailers of various lengths.  I’m sure other railroads had similar diagrams.

 

The diagram is reasonably accurate compared to photos.  Two notable exceptions are the lower tie rod shown on the front Duff-Norton Jack Stands was not used and the tall Guard Stakes shown one each side were dropped from use sometime between 1953 and 1956. From photos it seems they were more useful in the yard as a visual aid for loading trailers than for providing any kind of security for a potentially tippy trailer.

 

Peter Ness

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Friday, August 24, 2018 10:44 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Semi trailers (was: Sunshine Kit Question)

 

[Edited Message Follows]

You're dreaming of the future, John. 8'-6" width didn't become "street legal" until sometime well after 1960, and the standard pallet used to be 42" wide. Trucks and trailers in the period of this list were limited to 8'-0" wide.

Dennis Storzek

Added on edit:

FEDERAL SIZE REGULATIONS FOR COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLES (CMVs)

The Federal Government first enacted size regulations for CMVs with the passage of the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956. This Act provided a maximum vehicle width of 96 inches (2.44 meters) on the Interstate highway system. Subsequently, the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1976 increased the allowable width for buses to 102 inches (2.6 meters). The Surface Transportation Assistance Act (STAA) of 1982 extended the same width requirement of 102 inches to commercial trucks. At the same time, the STAA expanded the highway network on which the Federal width provision applied from the Interstate to the National Network (NN) of highways. (See discussion of the NN on page 12.)

Source: 
https://ops.fhwa.dot.gov/freight/publications/size_regs_final_rpt/


Re: Stand-off End Straps on GN Truss Rod Boxcar

Mikebrock
 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bill Welch
Sent: Saturday, August 25, 2018 1:35 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Stand-off End Straps on GN Truss Rod Boxcar

 

Stand-off details like ladders and grabs have become the norm in creating scale models of freight cars and I wanted to take it another step and have some Stand-off Straps" on my GN truss rod boxcar ends. Before assembling the ends and sides I carefully removed the molded-on straps on the ends and mostly did a clean job w/a minimum gouges and then re-scribed the wood sheathing joints. When I was happy with how things looked I used a sanding sponge to give the ends a finished appearance. Recently I cut some 0.005 styrene sheet into strips wide enough to match the straps on the sides of the car and from these strips cut some small squares. I then used CA to glue two of the squares onto the end posts where the ends straps pass over these posts and used Tamiya Super Thin to glue the straps in place centered on the end. By having a styrene-to-styrene joint it enabled me to make slight adjustment if necessary to make sure the straps was square and level. I let the fast working Tamiya cure for a few minutes and then pulled gently on one end of each strap and pressed it down on the corner at the same time making it taught with sharp bend at each corner. I secured each corner with a small amount of CA so it would set up quickly and then came back with a bent piece of 0.010 wire to wick CA under each corner of the end to create a fillet of CA so when dry this slightly elevated area would have a hard base. I allowed all of this to sit overnight and the next morning trimmed of the excess styrene w/a fresh Single Edge Razor Blade and used rivets harvested from an Athearn gondola to create the bolt heads that secure the strapping on the prototype.

Bill Welch

 


Re: Stand-off End Straps on GN Truss Rod Boxcar

Mikebrock
 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bill Welch
Sent: Saturday, August 25, 2018 1:35 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Stand-off End Straps on GN Truss Rod Boxcar

 

Stand-off details like ladders and grabs have become the norm in creating scale models of freight cars and I wanted to take it another step and have some Stand-off Straps" on my GN truss rod boxcar ends. Before assembling the ends and sides I carefully removed the molded-on straps on the ends and mostly did a clean job w/a minimum gouges and then re-scribed the wood sheathing joints. When I was happy with how things looked I used a sanding sponge to give the ends a finished appearance. Recently I cut some 0.005 styrene sheet into strips wide enough to match the straps on the sides of the car and from these strips cut some small squares. I then used CA to glue two of the squares onto the end posts where the ends straps pass over these posts and used Tamiya Super Thin to glue the straps in place centered on the end. By having a styrene-to-styrene joint it enabled me to make slight adjustment if necessary to make sure the straps was square and level. I let the fast working Tamiya cure for a few minutes and then pulled gently on one end of each strap and pressed it down on the corner at the same time making it taught with sharp bend at each corner. I secured each corner with a small amount of CA so it would set up quickly and then came back with a bent piece of 0.010 wire to wick CA under each corner of the end to create a fillet of CA so when dry this slightly elevated area would have a hard base. I allowed all of this to sit overnight and the next morning trimmed of the excess styrene w/a fresh Single Edge Razor Blade and used rivets harvested from an Athearn gondola to create the bolt heads that secure the strapping on the prototype.

Bill Welch

 


Stand-off End Straps on GN Truss Rod Boxcar

Bill Welch
 

Stand-off details like ladders and grabs have become the norm in creating scale models of freight cars and I wanted to take it another step and have some Stand-off Straps" on my GN truss rod boxcar ends. Before assembling the ends and sides I carefully removed the molded-on straps on the ends and mostly did a clean job w/a minimum gouges and then re-scribed the wood sheathing joints. When I was happy with how things looked I used a sanding sponge to give the ends a finished appearance. Recently I cut some 0.005 styrene sheet into strips wide enough to match the straps on the sides of the car and from these strips cut some small squares. I then used CA to glue two of the squares onto the end posts where the ends straps pass over these posts and used Tamiya Super Thin to glue the straps in place centered on the end. By having a styrene-to-styrene joint it enabled me to make slight adjustment if necessary to make sure the straps was square and level. I let the fast working Tamiya cure for a few minutes and then pulled gently on one end of each strap and pressed it down on the corner at the same time making it taught with sharp bend at each corner. I secured each corner with a small amount of CA so it would set up quickly and then came back with a bent piece of 0.010 wire to wick CA under each corner of the end to create a fillet of CA so when dry this slightly elevated area would have a hard base. I allowed all of this to sit overnight and the next morning trimmed of the excess styrene w/a fresh Single Edge Razor Blade and used rivets harvested from an Athearn gondola to create the bolt heads that secure the strapping on the prototype.

Bill Welch

 


Re: Semi trailers (was: Sunshine Kit Question)

Peter Ness
 

Here’s the NH trailer loading diagram published in a Railway Age article in 1953 or ’54 clearly showing the max trailer width of 8’ and the tie-down points for trailers of various lengths.  I’m sure other railroads had similar diagrams.

 

The diagram is reasonably accurate compared to photos.  Two notable exceptions are the lower tie rod shown on the front Duff-Norton Jack Stands was not used and the tall Guard Stakes shown one each side were dropped from use sometime between 1953 and 1956. From photos it seems they were more useful in the yard as a visual aid for loading trailers than for providing any kind of security for a potentially tippy trailer.

 

Peter Ness

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Friday, August 24, 2018 10:44 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Semi trailers (was: Sunshine Kit Question)

 

[Edited Message Follows]

You're dreaming of the future, John. 8'-6" width didn't become "street legal" until sometime well after 1960, and the standard pallet used to be 42" wide. Trucks and trailers in the period of this list were limited to 8'-0" wide.

Dennis Storzek

Added on edit:

FEDERAL SIZE REGULATIONS FOR COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLES (CMVs)

The Federal Government first enacted size regulations for CMVs with the passage of the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956. This Act provided a maximum vehicle width of 96 inches (2.44 meters) on the Interstate highway system. Subsequently, the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1976 increased the allowable width for buses to 102 inches (2.6 meters). The Surface Transportation Assistance Act (STAA) of 1982 extended the same width requirement of 102 inches to commercial trucks. At the same time, the STAA expanded the highway network on which the Federal width provision applied from the Interstate to the National Network (NN) of highways. (See discussion of the NN on page 12.)

Source: https://ops.fhwa.dot.gov/freight/publications/size_regs_final_rpt/


Re: Two New Kadee Running Boards Announced

Clark Propst
 

I use a dot of canopy glue to hold the Kadee or metal RBs in place.
Clark Propst 


Re: HO scale ASF A-3 Ride Control trucks with roller bearings

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Friends,

Wasn't his name actually "Minton"? I'm sure Mr. Cronkite is past caring now, but as Dale Carnegie said, "A person's name is their greatest treasure."

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿

On 8/24/18 10:39 PM, Dennis Storzek wrote:

On Fri, Aug 24, 2018 at 04:38 PM, John Hagen wrote:

Who in the wide world of trains would prefer to measure in 17/64fths than 7 mm?

Boy, guys like Milton Cronkite were truly the model train world “he men” of the day.

Macho, macho trainman; I want to be a macho trainman……

John Hagen

Well, except 1:43.5 (7MM scale) makes the track gauge 4'- 6.5", while 1:45 (17/64 scale) yields the correct 4'-8.5".

Milton Cronkite, on the other hand, used neither. He built his models to 1:48, but then corrected the track gauge (almost) to 1-3/16", a scale 4'-9", so called Q gauge. I guess when you custom build your own mechanisms you can use any gauge you want. I'm surprised he didn't go all the way and set the gauge the correct 1.770" instead of 1.188", but he may have for wheels... prototype track gauge can vary as much as 2" oversize on tight curves, and I've never found a reference as to what dimension he set his wheel gauge to.

Dennis Storzek

 



Re: Two New Kadee Running Boards Announced

Tony Thompson
 

Canopy glue, no holes!
Tony Thompson

On Aug 24, 2018, at 3:20 PM, O Fenton Wells <srrfan1401@...> wrote:

Lester, What do you use for glue,

On 8/24/18, Lester Breuer <rforailroad@...> wrote:
Bill I do no drilling. I cut the pins off and mount/glue directly to car
running board saddles. I find this method works best for me. I have had
no problems with running boards applied this way coming loose on cars
running on an operating railroad.

Lester Breuer




--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...



Re: Semi trailers (was: Sunshine Kit Question)

Douglas Harding
 

Actually the standard grocery pallet is 48”x40”, allowing two pallets to easily sit side by side in a 8’ (exterior dimension) body. Military pallets started as 48”x48”, but as trucks came into play for transportation the 48”x40” pallet became the standard.

 

https://www.1001pallets.com/the-history-of-pallets/

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Friday, August 24, 2018 9:44 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Semi trailers (was: Sunshine Kit Question)

 

You're dreaming of the future, John. 8'-6" width didn't become "street legal" until sometime well after 1960, and the standard pallet used to be 42" wide. Trucks and trailers in the period of this list were limited to 8'-0" wide.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Semi trailers (was: Sunshine Kit Question)

Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
 
Edited

You're dreaming of the future, John. 8'-6" width didn't become "street legal" until sometime well after 1960, and the standard pallet used to be 42" wide. Trucks and trailers in the period of this list were limited to 8'-0" wide.

Dennis Storzek

Added on edit:

FEDERAL SIZE REGULATIONS FOR COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLES (CMVs)

The Federal Government first enacted size regulations for CMVs with the passage of the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956. This Act provided a maximum vehicle width of 96 inches (2.44 meters) on the Interstate highway system. Subsequently, the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1976 increased the allowable width for buses to 102 inches (2.6 meters). The Surface Transportation Assistance Act (STAA) of 1982 extended the same width requirement of 102 inches to commercial trucks. At the same time, the STAA expanded the highway network on which the Federal width provision applied from the Interstate to the National Network (NN) of highways. (See discussion of the NN on page 12.)

Source: https://ops.fhwa.dot.gov/freight/publications/size_regs_final_rpt/


Re: HO scale ASF A-3 Ride Control trucks with roller bearings

Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
 

On Fri, Aug 24, 2018 at 04:38 PM, John Hagen wrote:

Who in the wide world of trains would prefer to measure in 17/64fths than 7 mm?

Boy, guys like Milton Cronkite were truly the model train world “he men” of the day.

Macho, macho trainman; I want to be a macho trainman……

John Hagen

Well, except 1:43.5 (7MM scale) makes the track gauge 4'- 6.5", while 1:45 (17/64 scale) yields the correct 4'-8.5".

Milton Cronkite, on the other hand, used neither. He built his models to 1:48, but then corrected the track gauge (almost) to 1-3/16", a scale 4'-9", so called Q gauge. I guess when you custom build your own mechanisms you can use any gauge you want. I'm surprised he didn't go all the way and set the gauge the correct 1.770" instead of 1.188", but he may have for wheels... prototype track gauge can vary as much as 2" oversize on tight curves, and I've never found a reference as to what dimension he set his wheel gauge to.

Dennis Storzek

 


Semi trailers (was: Sunshine Kit Question)

John Hagen <sprinthag@...>
 

I am looking at two Walther's semi trailers. A 35' fluted side CNW and a Soo Line 32' wide spaced vertical rib.
The CNW scales out to 35' length, 7' 1" width (too narrow), 4' floor height and 12' 6" Overall height.
The Soo scales out to 32' length, 8' 7" width (very close to right on), 4' 6" floor height (within limits) and 12' 4" overall height.
These are both city delivery boxes with roll up doors. And, other than the way too narrow CNW (Interior has to be a bit over 8' to allow two standard 4"' skids to placed side by side. Outside width has to be in the 8' 8" area, which the Soo is.
When viewing the trailers at a 3/4 shot rear they look way off. Part of that is the body height, which is 8' 3" for the CNW and 9' 9" for the Soo. Combine that with the 1' 6" width and you really can't park these them any where near one each other.
Unfortunately, that 32" trailer, which carries the "Walthers" name on the underframe,  is no longer listed. The 35' fluted trail is available in many road or companion names. I say unfortunately because while the 32' looks absolutely correct, the 35' looks like a toy. Oh well.
John Hagen


Re: Two New Kadeem Running Boards Announced

Nelson Moyer
 

We all have our favorite ways of doing things, but I’m with Lester and Denny on this one. I cut the pins from running boards in plastic kits as well, because I they aren’t prototypical and I think the pins detract from a model’s appearance. One of the beauties of this forum is that we have the opportunity to learn about how others do things, and occasionally I’ve found out about techniques and products reported by members that were compelling enough for me to change my mind and adopt them.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Denny Anspach
Sent: Friday, August 24, 2018 5:48 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Two New Kadee Running Boards Announced

 

Lester Breuer responds to an expressed need for a Kadee running board drilling template:

 

 ….I do no drilling.  I cut the pins off and mount/glue directly to car running board saddles.

 

Lester has it just right.  Tiny dabs of resilient Barge cement on the running board saddles does it, and does it forever.  I clip off the index pins on the angle end supports as well, just letting these very hardy pieces to just rest against the car end.

 

Now, if Kadee would only produce wood varieties!

 

Denny

 

  

Denny S. Anspach MD

Okoboji, IA

 


Re: HO scale ASF A-3 Ride Control trucks with roller bearings

John Hagen <sprinthag@...>
 

Well, it woulda been okay if the U.S. didn’t abhor the metric system so much back then. Instead they chose to widen the gauge to 5’ or, for the serious modelers, they chose to work in 17/64 scale.

Who in the wide world of trains would prefer to measure in 17/64fths than 7 mm?

Boy, guys like Milton Cronkite were truly the model train world “he men” of the day.

Macho, macho trainman; I want to be a macho trainman……

John Hagen

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Daniel A. Mitchell
Sent: Thursday, August 23, 2018 9:06 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] HO scale ASF A-3 Ride Control trucks with roller bearings

 

Well, NO it is not!  If we want to pick nits it’s actually 1:87.0857142. A really goofy scale resulting from the formal definition of 3.5mm = 1 ft. An odd mix of Metric and English units that does not divide out evenly. This results from “HO” being half of European “O” gauge, which is 7mm to the foot … another goofy scale. Why did they pick such a congloberation in the first place

 

Dan Mitchell

==========

On Aug 23, 2018, at 9:53 AM, Bill Daniels via Groups.Io <billinsf@...> wrote:

 

Not to be a picker of nits, but you should be cubing 87.1 and not 87... that is the correct ratio.

 

Bill Daniels

On a grey day by the bay.


On Aug 23, 2018, at 5:18 AM, Daniel A. Mitchell <danmitch@...> wrote:

If you have a computer/calculator connected to your scale, it could do the conversion for you … i guess that would be a “scale scale”. Then you could weight your models directly Graft this under a piece of HO track and you’d have a working, direct reading, track scale.

 

Dan Mitchell

==========

On Aug 23, 2018, at 7:08 AM, John Hagen via Groups.Io <sprinthag@...> wrote:

 

Wish my weight was in scale tons.

Anyway, to check the weight wouldn’t you need a scale scale?

John John Hagen

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tony Thompson
Sent: Wednesday, August 22, 2018 1:16 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] HO scale ASF A-3 Ride Control trucks with roller bearings

 

 John Hagen wrote:




Just for the fun of it seeing as how proper nomenclature has been introduced;

There is no way in hell an HO truck, even a pair of them, could weigh 70 tons.

I’ll now return to my nap.

 

      What, you don't know about scale tons?

 

Tony Thompson

 

 

 

 

 


New Tools for the Clearwater Car Shops

Bill Welch
 

Xxtreme Modeling friend George Toman suggested a new set of cutters to the Boys at the Clearwater Car Shops and over their lunch hour they poured over the Micro-Mark catalog and came up with a suggested order for the Boss who added a few things. The cutters on the right are those suggested by George #87609 that are called Extra Sharp w/a 13° cutting angle, ideal for Xxtreme Modelers while the Boss also ordered those on the left, #87626 w/a 25° cutting angle. Both are from the Japanese company Fujiya. The Hemostat in the middle looked very clever and their design appealed to the Boys. Also received was a LED lighting system for the Shop's indispensable Optivisor.

Bill Welch


Re: Two New Kadee Running Boards Announced

Denny Anspach <danspachmd@...>
 

Lester Breuer responds to an expressed need for a Kadee running board drilling template:

 ….I do no drilling.  I cut the pins off and mount/glue directly to car running board saddles.

Lester has it just right.  Tiny dabs of resilient Barge cement on the running board saddles does it, and does it forever.  I clip off the index pins on the angle end supports as well, just letting these very hardy pieces to just rest against the car end.

Now, if Kadee would only produce wood varieties!

Denny

  
Denny S. Anspach MD
Okoboji, IA


Re: Two New Kadee Running Boards Announced

Bill Welch
 

Lester I prefer mechanical attachments for these.

Bill Welch


Re: Two New Kadee Running Boards Announced

gtws00
 

Lester, what type of glue do you use?
George Toman


Re: Two New Kadee Running Boards Announced

Ed Hawkins
 


On Aug 24, 2018, at 11:17 AM, Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:

Saw these at the Collinsville RPM last month. I just wish some entrepreneur would calculate/create a drilling template to make it easy to adapt Red Caboose/IMWX. Intermountain, Branchline/Atlas, etc. roofs to use these.

Bill,
I have successfully installed Kadee running boards on Branchline Trains box car roofs. It’s pretty easy - on the underneath side of the BT roof are 6 small dimples located perfectly for spotting the holes to be drilled. I use a drill size slightly larger than the Kadee pins so that they have some freedom to move a slight amount and to be straight from end to end. I found this a necessary step as I could never duplicate the precision holes in the Kadee PS-1 roof and the locking method. 

I developed a simple jig to locate the holes for the pins under the latitudinals. Once the running board is installed to the roof, I affix the pins permanently with Barge cement from the underside to keep them in place. I made another template to locate the two holes for the end supports at the top of the ends. Once installed they were perfectly straight, and years later they’re still straight. 

Roofs not having the starter dimples will require a template to position the holes, which can be devised by using a BT roof for the locations.

Lester’s method that doesn’t require drilling holes works well for him, and I might give his method a try especially for roofs other than BT. 
Regards,
Ed Hawkins

38741 - 38760 of 196900