Date   

Re: ART Book has been published

Jerry Michels
 

Oops, sorry Tony.  I didn't realize there was a "commercial day" or I would have waited.  Jerry


Re: Modeling Those WLE SS cars w/7-ft doors

Dennis Storzek
 

Rich, I think we've already run through the list... W&LE for the 'innies', and PM for the 'outies', plus anyplace they might have gone second hand.

While the text extolling the virtues of the Vulcan end sells a good line, they were really a terrible idea, because there is almost no structure in the car roof to anchor them to. Horizontal ribs that are anchored to the car sides make a lot more sense. So, why these? I get the feeling it was purely patent avoidance, since the Murphy end patent had pretty much locked up horizontal ribs. Yes, the Murphy end did have imitators, and yes, they were eventually ruled to be infringing on the Murphy end patent and left the market.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Modeling Those WLE SS cars w/7-ft doors

Rich Yoder
 

Hi Guys,

Does anyone have a listing of the RRs’ that had cars with this type of an end?

Rich

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brent Greer
Sent: Monday, September 3, 2018 12:10 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Modeling Those WLE SS cars w/7-ft doors

 

Thanks Ray! I'd love a set of these, are the from Shapeways or an individual that made castings?   Did he also do the PM type? The PM were outward corrugations and were an 8+8 pattern.   I would want several sets of those.

Brent


 

 

_._,_._,_


Re: Modeling Those WLE SS cars w/7-ft doors

Mansell Peter Hambly
 

I am as well.

Mansell Peter Hambly
COQUITLAM, B.C.


From: "rdkirkham" <rdkirkham@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Sent: Monday, September 3, 2018 9:01:02 AM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Modeling Those WLE SS cars w/7-ft doors

Excellent.  I’m interested.

 

Rob Kirkham

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ray Breyer via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, September 3, 2018 8:55 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Modeling Those WLE SS cars w/7-ft doors

 

The ends for these cars already exist as a print; they have for a couple of years. If there's enough interest I can see if the artist is interested in drawing & printing the rest of the car.

 

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL

 

 

On Sunday, September 2, 2018, 6:50:14 PM CDT, Robert kirkham <rdkirkham@...> wrote:

 

 

Tried playing around in Sketchup with various corrugation shapes this afternoon.  I think this is fairly close.  9” spacing as suggested by Dennis.  4.5” depth of corrugations (just a guess).  Flat on the outer surface of the end, and the space between each corrugation about 1.5” wide.  Each corrugations has a curved radius at the back about 1”.  Approx. 28 degree bend in the corrugations creates the points at each end.

 

So . . . with end height from bottom of the end to the top of the sides, height from bottom of the end to the peek, and width, it wouldn’t take much to make this end.  

 

Rob

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Robert kirkham
Sent: Sunday, September 2, 2018 3:12 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Modeling Those WLE SS cars w/7-ft doors

 

So . . . are there two different ends on these cars – one with 5 wider corrugations per panel; the other with 6?  The new lead stark brick photo seems to show that, unless it’s an illusion.

 

 

Rob Kirkham

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Eric Hansmann
Sent: Sunday, September 2, 2018 2:15 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Modeling Those WLE SS cars w/7-ft doors

 

The DA ends are a natural thought but the ribs are not spaced the same. You have to invert the casting then scrape off details. Scratch building would be an easier path.  

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN


On Sep 2, 2018, at 3:05 PM, Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:

. . .and the Accurail AAR gon and Detail Assoc's ends make this an easy kitbash. Gone by my modeling period however

Bill Welch




Eric Lombard

lrkdbn
 

Dear group:
I would like to contact Mr. Eric Lombard of Homewood IL off list.
My email is <lrkdbn@...>
Sincerely,
Larry King


Re: My railroad materials

Rufus Cone
 

Without meaning to criticize anyone from the previous posts, and certainly not Mark, I strongly urge those of you near facilities with collections to volunteer with the curators of those collections.

Approached in a positive way, many will appreciate your help.

This is a service and a learning experience that can be valuable to you and those sharing your interests.

Mark Landgraf wrote, in part:

Yes, finding a home for your collections can be difficult
--
Rufus Cone
Bozeman, MT


Re: My railroad materials

mark_landgraf
 

Guys

Yes, finding a home for your collections can be difficult. I've had several collections that I have scanned and been asked to find new homes for.

The collections that I have dealt with have all had a northeastern flavor. As David stated, some places are getting full.  What he didn't say is that other places like a previously mentioned College in Texas with large rr holdings are sitting on collections that they don't want to admit that they even own. For example, they have the CB&Q Steam Locos and all of the BN predecessor rr's freight car drawings are in their possession, but they are uncatalogued and therefore, unavailable.

In the last few years, CSX has donated a number of trailers to a predecessor rr society. The  trailers contained a mixture of Family lines rr's stuff.  The society retained the stuff from their rr and then eBayed the rest of it.

I would strongly advise that persons with large collections visit the locations that they would like to have their collections maintained by. Questions about availability, future sustainability of the organization, will the paper be scanned and back-up copies stored off site just in the event of fire or flood. Climate control is important for the preservation of 100 year old paper.  Generally if the rr used rag stock paper, it is still in decent shape.  Non rag stock paper gets rather brittle and needs to be steamed before it can be unrolled. It is better to store all of these drawing in a flat condition rather than rolled.

I have placed several collections with the Western New York RR Historical Society.  They have heated buildings in Buffalo NY at the Discovery Center at 200 Lee Street.  They are open several days a week and have a paid staff. They have plenty of space and don't seemed to be concerned about how far the rr was from Buffalo.  Contact Ed Patton at epatton3@.... They have a second building that in being prepared for future use.  Both the EL and NKP societies store their collections there.

Any organization will want to see a box by box inventory of the collection. A printed copy for each box should be placed into that box. Having these lists in digital format will go a long way towards making the contents of your collection useful to others. While you are preparing this inventory, prepare a list of standard abbreviations that are used. I would recommend fully spelling out most words. For instance, a freight car General Arrangement drawing should fully spelled out rather than using GA or Gen'l Arr abbreviations. When doing word searches, full words work a lot better.

Since this topic is somewhat outside of the scope of this group, I will offer to take comments and questions at my personal email:  mark_landgraf at yohoo dot com

Mark Landgraf
Albany NY


On Friday, August 31, 2018, 3:27:10 PM EDT, Dave Parker via Groups.Io <spottab@...> wrote:


Jared:

I recently spent two days in the archives of the California State RR Museum, and learned quite a bit about their operation and capabilities.  My take is that they are both staff- and space-limited and, by necessity, are rather selective about what they will accept.  Their collection tends to emphasize western railroads, although they will accept other materials if they feel there is sufficiently broad.  You can always inquire, but my guess is that they will say your materials are are too regional in nature.

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA

Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: Modeling Those WLE SS cars w/7-ft doors

gary laakso
 

Ray:

 

A wonderful offer and I will take a pair of cars.

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ray Breyer via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, September 3, 2018 8:55 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Modeling Those WLE SS cars w/7-ft doors

 

The ends for these cars already exist as a print; they have for a couple of years. If there's enough interest I can see if the artist is interested in drawing & printing the rest of the car.

 

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL

 

 

On Sunday, September 2, 2018, 6:50:14 PM CDT, Robert kirkham <rdkirkham@...> wrote:

 

 

Tried playing around in Sketchup with various corrugation shapes this afternoon.  I think this is fairly close.  9” spacing as suggested by Dennis.  4.5” depth of corrugations (just a guess).  Flat on the outer surface of the end, and the space between each corrugation about 1.5” wide.  Each corrugations has a curved radius at the back about 1”.  Approx. 28 degree bend in the corrugations creates the points at each end.

 

So . . . with end height from bottom of the end to the top of the sides, height from bottom of the end to the peek, and width, it wouldn’t take much to make this end.  

 

Rob

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Robert kirkham
Sent: Sunday, September 2, 2018 3:12 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Modeling Those WLE SS cars w/7-ft doors

 

So . . . are there two different ends on these cars – one with 5 wider corrugations per panel; the other with 6?  The new lead stark brick photo seems to show that, unless it’s an illusion.

 

 

Rob Kirkham

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Eric Hansmann
Sent: Sunday, September 2, 2018 2:15 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Modeling Those WLE SS cars w/7-ft doors

 

The DA ends are a natural thought but the ribs are not spaced the same. You have to invert the casting then scrape off details. Scratch building would be an easier path.  

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN


On Sep 2, 2018, at 3:05 PM, Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:

. . .and the Accurail AAR gon and Detail Assoc's ends make this an easy kitbash. Gone by my modeling period however

Bill Welch


Re: Modeling Those WLE SS cars w/7-ft doors

Brent Greer
 

Chris,  Thank you for posting these images.   Note that the Vulcan ends in these views are the 8+8 style outward corrugations that were used on the PM cars.  (Eric Hansmann shared a photo of one of these double sheathed cars).   But just as great for me is the photo of the AC&F two piece end at the upper left.  I have been looking for a way to make these for some months, or to find someone who can 3D print them for me.  There was a photo of a car with these ends in the recent article showing potential prototype matches and kitbashing opportunities for the new Accurail 36' boxcars.  Since then, I also found a drawing of these ends in the N&W archives for their application to several classes of early N&W boxcars.  I then found a photograph of a string of early N&W stockcars with these ends applied.


Anyone out there with the skill, time, willingness to help bring these into existence for us (okay, for me)?


Brent



Dr. J. Brent Greer



From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of bigfourroad <vannessco@...>
Sent: Monday, September 3, 2018 1:54 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Modeling Those WLE SS cars w/7-ft doors
 
FWIW here attached are two snips as JPEGS including a discussion of the Vulcan Steel Car Ends from the 1919 Car Builders Cyclopedia available on line form the Hathi Trust Library site.  Of note, although I doubt anyone could tell the difference in HO or S scale, is that the corrugations were apparently deepest hence strongest nearest the floor where the heaviest cargos would normally be placed. I've been pondering how that could be accomplished and sill leave the finished piece a perfect rectangle -- some interesting math involved there but I suppose if you can calculate conical boiler courses in much heavier steel that would be child's play. 
Chris Rooney 


Re: Modeling Those WLE SS cars w/7-ft doors

bigfourroad
 

FWIW here attached are two snips as JPEGS including a discussion of the Vulcan Steel Car Ends from the 1919 Car Builders Cyclopedia available on line form the Hathi Trust Library site.  Of note, although I doubt anyone could tell the difference in HO or S scale, is that the corrugations were apparently deepest hence strongest nearest the floor where the heaviest cargos would normally be placed. I've been pondering how that could be accomplished and sill leave the finished piece a perfect rectangle -- some interesting math involved there but I suppose if you can calculate conical boiler courses in much heavier steel that would be child's play. 
Chris Rooney 


Re: ART Book has been published

Tony Thompson
 

Jerry Michels wrote:

Hi Folks, Thought I'd announce the good news that the ART book is out!  It is available from Signature Press and The Missouri Pacific Historical Society.

      I was going to wait until Friday ("commercial day") for an announcement, but since co-author Jerry Michels has spoken, I will offer more description now. Here is the blurb from the back of the dust jacket.

      The refrigerator car was the business of American Refrigerator Transit, supplying the cars to its owners, the Missouri Pacific and Wabash Railroads. From its inception in the 1880s until the 1960s, this company served produce-growing areas in the southern Midwest and in Texas, and carried that produce throughout North America. The history of the company, its operations, and the fleet of cars behind it, are the focus of this book.
The authors present more than 400 photos, most never before published, to show the lettering and general appearance of a wide variety of these cars, which ran on railroads throughout the country. The company history also fills a gap in our knowledge of railroad history, having no prior presentation at this level of detail.    

      The book is 240 pages, 8.5 x 11-inch size, hardbound, available direct from Signature Press at our website, www.signaturepress.com, for $75.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






ART Book has been published

Jerry Michels
 

Hi Folks, Thought I'd announce the good news that the ART book is out!  It is available from Signature Press and The Missouri Pacific Historical Society.

This effort took Gene Semon and I over ten years to complete.  Special thanks to all those who helped us along the way, especially Ed Hawkins and the late Dick Kuelbs.

Enjoy!

Jerry Michels


Re: Hand brake dogma

gtws00
 

Gene,
Thanks so much for that information on Hand Brakes. 
George Toman


Re: Hand brake dogma

Eric Lombard
 



Thank you, Gene! I learned from your pedantry. Here's applause for the years of work you have devoted to putting on the brakes, so to speak. 

On Mon, Sep 3, 2018 at 10:53 AM Gene Green via Groups.Io <genegreen1942=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
OK, I'm going to get pendantic and, for some of you, quite annoying.  I am not intending to single out any one person but, if the shoe fits, wear it.

There is a significant number of you who seem to prefer "brake wheel" when, in my opinion, the better term is hand brake.  An example:   "Which brake wheel is on XYZ railroad's 12300 series box cars?"   I would hope that the questioner would want to model the entire hand brake correctly, not just the hand wheel.

Some of you, however, are more advanced or more aware and ask "Where is information on an ABC hand brake as used on XYZ railroad's 12300 series box cars?"

I have identified 375 different hand brakes from at least two dozen different manufacturers in use in the 20th century.  My 375 does not include experimental hand brakes, of which there were many, or those which did not enjoy at least a modicum of commercial success, of which there were a few.  Some of the hand brakes differ internally but are housed in the same outer housing.  Some manufacturers only offered one hand brake, often for only a short period of time.  Some manufacturers, Equipco, for example, created an entirely new housing for each new hand brake.  Others, like Ajax, put different mechanisms in the same housing.  Actually that last statement is false.  There were at least four Ajax housings in our period although they were so similar that, for HO and smaller, the differences might not seem significant.

Equipment diagrams often only specify the hand brake manufacturer but not the specific model.  Often, in such cases, I can refer to a table I have created and come close to identifying the correct hand brake if the date the car was built is also known.  Some manufacturers only offered one hand brake, some only one at at time but others had different hand brakes available for different purposes at the same time.  There are ratchet lever, lever, horizontal wheel and vertical wheel hand brakes as well as a few that defy easy classification.  These few are rare and seldom encountered.  When I say the a manufacturer had more than one model hand brake available at a given time, I mean more than one horizontal wheel hand brake or more than one vertical wheel hand brake.

Why do so many plastic models (Athearn, MDC, etc.) have Ajax hand brakes?  Because Ajax had 90% of the hand brake market in the late 1940s and early 1950s.  Other hand brake manufacturers have privately described the various nefarious, if not illegal, means used by Ajax but I have yet to confirm a single instance.

I would hope we could all use the term hand brake instead of brake wheel unless, of course, reference is only being made to that one specific part of the hand brake.  And, yes, I freely acknowledge that the brake wheel on house cars pretty much obscures the hand brake housing so that we can't really see much in the typical photo.  Some manufacturers - Kadee, Moloco, Detail Associates - are moving us in the right direction.  I put Kadee at the top of the list because of their insistence on good and sufficient information and incredible die work.  Please support those manufacturers when you can.

Finally, tank cars and flat cars also have power hand brakes and information is available to cut the necessary dies.  Our tank and flat cars should have more than a short piece of wire stabbed into the end of the car and topped with a 16" hand wheel.  And to those who argue one can't see tank and flat car geared hand brakes, I respond, yes, you can.  Whenever the opportunity presents itself, push manufacturers in the direction of including the hand brake on tank and flat cars.  To cite just one example, the Red Caboose tank car should have had an ACF geared hand brake.  That hand brake was a simple shape and would have been an easy die to cut.  Opportunity missed.

I apologize for getting on my soap box.  I shall slink back into the shadows once again.

Gene Green



Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: Modeling Those WLE SS cars w/7-ft doors

Brent Greer
 

Thanks Ray! I'd love a set of these, are the from Shapeways or an individual that made castings?   Did he also do the PM type? The PM were outward corrugations and were an 8+8 pattern.   I would want several sets of those.

Brent

________________________________
Dr. J. Brent Greer


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Ray Breyer via Groups.Io <rtbsvrr69@...>
Sent: Monday, September 3, 2018 11:54:41 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Modeling Those WLE SS cars w/7-ft doors
 
The ends for these cars already exist as a print; they have for a couple of years. If there's enough interest I can see if the artist is interested in drawing & printing the rest of the car.

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL


On Sunday, September 2, 2018, 6:50:14 PM CDT, Robert kirkham <rdkirkham@...> wrote:


Tried playing around in Sketchup with various corrugation shapes this afternoon.  I think this is fairly close.  9” spacing as suggested by Dennis.  4.5” depth of corrugations (just a guess).  Flat on the outer surface of the end, and the space between each corrugation about 1.5” wide.  Each corrugations has a curved radius at the back about 1”.  Approx. 28 degree bend in the corrugations creates the points at each end.

 

So . . . with end height from bottom of the end to the top of the sides, height from bottom of the end to the peek, and width, it wouldn’t take much to make this end.  

 

Rob

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Robert kirkham
Sent: Sunday, September 2, 2018 3:12 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Modeling Those WLE SS cars w/7-ft doors

 

So . . . are there two different ends on these cars – one with 5 wider corrugations per panel; the other with 6?  The new lead stark brick photo seems to show that, unless it’s an illusion.

 

 

Rob Kirkham

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Eric Hansmann
Sent: Sunday, September 2, 2018 2:15 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Modeling Those WLE SS cars w/7-ft doors

 

The DA ends are a natural thought but the ribs are not spaced the same. You have to invert the casting then scrape off details. Scratch building would be an easier path.  

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN


On Sep 2, 2018, at 3:05 PM, Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:

. . .and the Accurail AAR gon and Detail Assoc's ends make this an easy kitbash. Gone by my modeling period however

Bill Welch


Re: Modeling Those WLE SS cars w/7-ft doors

Robert kirkham
 

Excellent.  I’m interested.

 

Rob Kirkham

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ray Breyer via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, September 3, 2018 8:55 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Modeling Those WLE SS cars w/7-ft doors

 

The ends for these cars already exist as a print; they have for a couple of years. If there's enough interest I can see if the artist is interested in drawing & printing the rest of the car.

 

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL

 

 

On Sunday, September 2, 2018, 6:50:14 PM CDT, Robert kirkham <rdkirkham@...> wrote:

 

 

Tried playing around in Sketchup with various corrugation shapes this afternoon.  I think this is fairly close.  9” spacing as suggested by Dennis.  4.5” depth of corrugations (just a guess).  Flat on the outer surface of the end, and the space between each corrugation about 1.5” wide.  Each corrugations has a curved radius at the back about 1”.  Approx. 28 degree bend in the corrugations creates the points at each end.

 

So . . . with end height from bottom of the end to the top of the sides, height from bottom of the end to the peek, and width, it wouldn’t take much to make this end.  

 

Rob

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Robert kirkham
Sent: Sunday, September 2, 2018 3:12 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Modeling Those WLE SS cars w/7-ft doors

 

So . . . are there two different ends on these cars – one with 5 wider corrugations per panel; the other with 6?  The new lead stark brick photo seems to show that, unless it’s an illusion.

 

 

Rob Kirkham

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Eric Hansmann
Sent: Sunday, September 2, 2018 2:15 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Modeling Those WLE SS cars w/7-ft doors

 

The DA ends are a natural thought but the ribs are not spaced the same. You have to invert the casting then scrape off details. Scratch building would be an easier path.  

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN


On Sep 2, 2018, at 3:05 PM, Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:

. . .and the Accurail AAR gon and Detail Assoc's ends make this an easy kitbash. Gone by my modeling period however

Bill Welch


Re: Modeling Those WLE SS cars w/7-ft doors

Ray Breyer
 

The ends for these cars already exist as a print; they have for a couple of years. If there's enough interest I can see if the artist is interested in drawing & printing the rest of the car.

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL


On Sunday, September 2, 2018, 6:50:14 PM CDT, Robert kirkham <rdkirkham@...> wrote:


Tried playing around in Sketchup with various corrugation shapes this afternoon.  I think this is fairly close.  9” spacing as suggested by Dennis.  4.5” depth of corrugations (just a guess).  Flat on the outer surface of the end, and the space between each corrugation about 1.5” wide.  Each corrugations has a curved radius at the back about 1”.  Approx. 28 degree bend in the corrugations creates the points at each end.

 

So . . . with end height from bottom of the end to the top of the sides, height from bottom of the end to the peek, and width, it wouldn’t take much to make this end.  

 

Rob

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Robert kirkham
Sent: Sunday, September 2, 2018 3:12 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Modeling Those WLE SS cars w/7-ft doors

 

So . . . are there two different ends on these cars – one with 5 wider corrugations per panel; the other with 6?  The new lead stark brick photo seems to show that, unless it’s an illusion.

 

 

Rob Kirkham

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Eric Hansmann
Sent: Sunday, September 2, 2018 2:15 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Modeling Those WLE SS cars w/7-ft doors

 

The DA ends are a natural thought but the ribs are not spaced the same. You have to invert the casting then scrape off details. Scratch building would be an easier path.  

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN


On Sep 2, 2018, at 3:05 PM, Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:

. . .and the Accurail AAR gon and Detail Assoc's ends make this an easy kitbash. Gone by my modeling period however

Bill Welch


Hand brake dogma

Gene Green <genegreen1942@...>
 

OK, I'm going to get pendantic and, for some of you, quite annoying.  I am not intending to single out any one person but, if the shoe fits, wear it.

There is a significant number of you who seem to prefer "brake wheel" when, in my opinion, the better term is hand brake.  An example:   "Which brake wheel is on XYZ railroad's 12300 series box cars?"   I would hope that the questioner would want to model the entire hand brake correctly, not just the hand wheel.

Some of you, however, are more advanced or more aware and ask "Where is information on an ABC hand brake as used on XYZ railroad's 12300 series box cars?"

I have identified 375 different hand brakes from at least two dozen different manufacturers in use in the 20th century.  My 375 does not include experimental hand brakes, of which there were many, or those which did not enjoy at least a modicum of commercial success, of which there were a few.  Some of the hand brakes differ internally but are housed in the same outer housing.  Some manufacturers only offered one hand brake, often for only a short period of time.  Some manufacturers, Equipco, for example, created an entirely new housing for each new hand brake.  Others, like Ajax, put different mechanisms in the same housing.  Actually that last statement is false.  There were at least four Ajax housings in our period although they were so similar that, for HO and smaller, the differences might not seem significant.

Equipment diagrams often only specify the hand brake manufacturer but not the specific model.  Often, in such cases, I can refer to a table I have created and come close to identifying the correct hand brake if the date the car was built is also known.  Some manufacturers only offered one hand brake, some only one at at time but others had different hand brakes available for different purposes at the same time.  There are ratchet lever, lever, horizontal wheel and vertical wheel hand brakes as well as a few that defy easy classification.  These few are rare and seldom encountered.  When I say the a manufacturer had more than one model hand brake available at a given time, I mean more than one horizontal wheel hand brake or more than one vertical wheel hand brake.

Why do so many plastic models (Athearn, MDC, etc.) have Ajax hand brakes?  Because Ajax had 90% of the hand brake market in the late 1940s and early 1950s.  Other hand brake manufacturers have privately described the various nefarious, if not illegal, means used by Ajax but I have yet to confirm a single instance.

I would hope we could all use the term hand brake instead of brake wheel unless, of course, reference is only being made to that one specific part of the hand brake.  And, yes, I freely acknowledge that the brake wheel on house cars pretty much obscures the hand brake housing so that we can't really see much in the typical photo.  Some manufacturers - Kadee, Moloco, Detail Associates - are moving us in the right direction.  I put Kadee at the top of the list because of their insistence on good and sufficient information and incredible die work.  Please support those manufacturers when you can.

Finally, tank cars and flat cars also have power hand brakes and information is available to cut the necessary dies.  Our tank and flat cars should have more than a short piece of wire stabbed into the end of the car and topped with a 16" hand wheel.  And to those who argue one can't see tank and flat car geared hand brakes, I respond, yes, you can.  Whenever the opportunity presents itself, push manufacturers in the direction of including the hand brake on tank and flat cars.  To cite just one example, the Red Caboose tank car should have had an ACF geared hand brake.  That hand brake was a simple shape and would have been an easy die to cut.  Opportunity missed.

I apologize for getting on my soap box.  I shall slink back into the shadows once again.

Gene Green



Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: Sunshine Kit Problem

Brent Greer
 

Hi Nelson,  I have a 34.25 in my stash.  I'll scan the instructions and PDS and send them to you later this morning.

Brent

________________________________
Dr. J. Brent Greer


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Nelson Moyer <npmoyer@...>
Sent: Sunday, September 2, 2018 10:38:11 PM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Sunshine Kit Problem
 

I ordered seven kit series 34 wood side reefers (plywood and T&G) from Martin shortly before he passed away. Unfortunately, he must have been feeling the effects of his terminal illness, because he sent three pairs of steel sides and two roofs that were different from those for the wood side cars. Attempts to rectify this situation after his death were fruitless. I’m building the three steel side cars as if they were kits 34.25 and 34.26, but without instructions or PDS. If anyone has them and scanning capability, I would sincerely appreciate receiving files sent to npmoyer at hotmail.com. Now the question. Both of the wood reefers from 1942 and 1944 and the steel reefers of 1946 had angle rail type hatch rests. The roofs for these cars have no protruding stubs next to the ribs, as seen in the aluminum painted roof in the picture. The box car red painted roof has the protruding stubs. There is an mark in the casting of the other roofs to indicate where to drill for the rails. There is a raised stub at the same place on the two odd roofs I received. . Are these stubs hatch rests used instead of the angle rails? Are the roofs with these stubs wrong for kits34.25 and 34.26? Did Martin send the wrong roofs in addition to the wrong sides? I need some help.

 

Nelson Moyer


Re: Modeling Those WLE SS cars w/7-ft doors

Fritz Milhaupt
 

If anyone ever makes the PM style of these ends, I'm in for at least a dozen sets, since the PM had a thousand cars equipped with them, in the 85000-85999 series. Built as auto cars, they were converted to single-door cars between 1937 and 1943. The last ones were in service on the C&O until 1957.

We can add the Manistee & Northeastern to the list of owners, since they got at least a handful of them second-hand, after the single-door conversion.

- Fritz Milhaupt
Pere Marquette Historical Society, Inc.
.

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