Date   

Re: Coupler lift bars.

Jim Betz
 

  ... BTW - it isn't important (to me) that a lift bar actually lifts ... as long as
it LOOKS like it will lift I'm happy.  - Jim B.


Re: Coupler lift bars.

Jim Betz
 

Schuyler,

  "Casual" ... Really?  How about "ROUGH"?  *VBG*

  My approach is to "live with the realities" ... in other words - you either
have to have equipment that lives in a display case or you have to 
accept that not everyone who handles your equipment will take the
care in doing so that you do.
  Broken/bent/missing high brake wheels, trucks/wheels/couplers that
get damaged, antennas that break off, railings that get bent/broken,
horns that go missing ... even entire cars (or God forbid trains) that go
to the floor.  These are all things you have to "accept" if you are 
going to operate your stuff.  
  Do you have to like it?  Of course not.  But you do have to "fix it".
At least it is EXceedingly rare for someone to even report damage
they caused (much less offer/be trusted to actually do the repairs).
                                                                                                            - Jim

P.S. The more "scale" and/or "prototypically accurate" stuff gets ... the
        more I like brass detail parts.  Or even entirely brass equipment.


Re: Flatcar Load: Conning Tower Tube

earlyrail
 

Well there are some with just a Blue Nose acquired at some classified location on some classified date
SSBN 628, 632 & 642



Re: Flatcar Load: Conning Tower Tube

Benjamin Hom
 

Loyal Shellback Marty McGuirk wrote:
"... but it's the same thing"... Spoken like a true 'wog... <g>


Aye, this list is infested with a large and slimy cargo of land-lubbers, beach-combers, cargo-rats, sea-lawyers, lounge-lizards, parlor-dunnigans, plow-deserters, park-bench warmers, chicken-chasers, hay-tossers, sand-crabs, four-flushers, cross-word puzzle bugs, and all other living creatures of the land, and last but no least, he-vamps, liberty-hounds, and Drug Store cow-boys falsely masquerading as seamen and man-o'-warsmen who have never appeared before Neptunus Rex.

I challenge those to provide proof of initiation into the Solemn Mysteries of the Ancient Order of the Deep, or remain silent on this subject until their inspection by His Majesty's Royal Staff.


Ben Hom (for)
Davy Jones, Scribe of Neptunus Rex


Re: Trix/Marklin Reefers

Steve and Barb Hile
 

Steve,
 
All of the old Yahoo group messages are archived in the Groups.io site and can be accessed with search tools.  There are a number of messages about the size of the roof hatches on the Trix/Marklin cars.
 
Steve Hile



From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of StephenK
Sent: Tuesday, October 02, 2018 8:05 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Trix/Marklin Reefers

I am sure that this topic was covered back in the old Yahoo Group, but I moved all my business here and can't refer to Yahoo any more, so here goes:

What is the prototype that Trix/Marklin used for the reefers that they produced a while back?   Are the models accurate?

Thanks

Steve Kay


Re: Trix/Marklin Reefers

Paul Doggett
 

Steve 

From memory the roofs are well out for anything particularly the ice hatches.

Paul Doggett England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 


On 2 Oct 2018, at 14:05, StephenK <thekays100@...> wrote:

I am sure that this topic was covered back in the old Yahoo Group, but I moved all my business here and can't refer to Yahoo any more, so here goes:

What is the prototype that Trix/Marklin used for the reefers that they produced a while back?   Are the models accurate?

Thanks

Steve Kay


Re: Flatcar Load: Conning Tower Tube

Marty McGuirk
 

"... but it's the same thing"... Spoken like a true 'wog... <g>

To get back to the original subject that got us started so deep in a rabbit hole we're well below the thermal layer... 

I'm fairly certain the photo that started all this shows some component being delivered for BB-63, since it's labeled as such. 

By the time the Iowa class ships  were built the US Navy, always lukewarm on the use of conning towers on BBs and armored cruisers, had stopped building ships with large armored true "conning towers" in favor of a heavier armor around the entire pilot house. In fact, the conning towers were removed from several of the BBs that were raised and rebuilt after Pearl Harbor. O

n the Wisconsin we referred to this are of the pilot house as the "Citadel" - a term near and dear to my heart! - it's basically an armored section (steel about 18" thick as I recall) within the pilot house that housed the helm, lee helm, and some other key nav and spotting equipment. But it was much larger than the tube shown on the flatcar as there would be five or six of us in there during GQ. 

The tube in the photo might be a portion of a essentially an armored "cable run" to protect the steering and/or electrical equipment running through the pilot house structure. 

Marty


On Oct 1, 2018, at 7:08 PM, CJ Riley via Groups.Io < cjriley42@...> wrote:

I am aware of the modern nomenclature but it's the same thing.

 


 


 


Trix/Marklin Reefers

StephenK
 

I am sure that this topic was covered back in the old Yahoo Group, but I moved all my business here and can't refer to Yahoo any more, so here goes:

What is the prototype that Trix/Marklin used for the reefers that they produced a while back?   Are the models accurate?

Thanks

Steve Kay


Re: Coupler lift bars.

Daniel A. Mitchell
 

Unfortunately, instead of bending they just snap off. Overly hard. Still, a nice product in general service.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Oct 1, 2018, at 10:14 PM, Schuyler Larrabee <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote:

I think the answer is in the description:  They don’t bend (or cut) easily.  IOW, casual handling won’t result in a bent bar.
 
Schuyler
 
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jon Miller
Sent: Monday, October 01, 2018 7:59 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Coupler lift bars.
 
On 10/1/2018 4:11 PM, Gary McMills wrote:
Tangent parts are hard steel and don't bend or cut easily.

    I'm curious why they don't make them out of brass (cost)?

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, 
SPROG, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS



Re: Flatcar Load: Conning Tower Tube

Daniel A. Mitchell
 

Picking nits, but no, it’s not the same thing.

A modern sub is not normally “conned” from the sail, but from the control-room inside the main pressure-hull below.

Earlier (WWI & WWII) subs were “conned” from a “conning tower” … a control-room that was part of the deck-house extending above the sub’s deck (a sort-of "wart” on the top of the pressure-hull). Thus it could then be considered a "conning tower” (a rather short tower to be sure).

In both cases there may be crew, even senior officers, on top of these protuberances when the sub is surfaced. They serve as lookouts or for "situational awareness”, and are in contact with the control-room below, but don’t actually control the sub from there.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Oct 1, 2018, at 7:08 PM, CJ Riley via Groups.Io <cjriley42@...> wrote:

I am aware of the modern nomenclature but it's the same thing.



Re: Flatcar Load: Conning Tower Tube

Brian Rochon
 

Armored conning towers were not restricted to US battleships.  According to U.S. Cruisers An Illustrated Design History by Norman Friedman, the later Cleveland class light cruisers had conning towers with armor thickness tapering from 5” at the bottom to 2.25” at the top and the Baltimore class heavy cruisers had conning towers with armor thickness tapering from 6” at the bottom to 3” at the top.  Ships of both classes were under construction at East Coast shipyards in October 1943, the date of the photo in question.

 

v/r

Brian Rochon

Silver Spring, MD

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ralph W. Brown
Sent: Monday, October 1, 2018 8:42 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Flatcar Load: Conning Tower Tube

 

Hi Fenton, Bruce, et al.,

 

Regarding the load, there are three drawings, including a longitudinal section, of the Missouri on the Missouri Memorial website.  The longitudinal section drawing may be found here: https://ussmissouri.org/learn-the-history/the-ship/as-built-blueprints.  If one examines this drawing, a tube labeled “Conning Tower Tube” runs vertically five decks from one deck below the main deck up to the O4 deck to the “Ship Conning Station” and the “Fire Control Station” above it.  I suspect that this F22 load is the bottom section of that tube.

 

Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532



Re: Flatcar Load: Conning Tower Tube

Tony Thompson
 

Ralph Brown wrote:

No argument there. One need only look at my "stainless steel" grill to know that even some so-called "stainless" will rust. Even on surface ships, constantly exposed gun mounts get a lot of attention. The "rust-resistant" steel just takes a little less effort to keep up.
Actually, the problem is likely worse for surface ships (Ben can tell me if that's wrong). Submerged in salt water is far less damaging than in the spray zone or the salt-lader drops in the air above the splash area. The corrosion on steel piles in marine environments is more severe out of the water than in it.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: BREX Reefer Ladders

Nelson Moyer
 

The ladder dimensions for the Sunshine BREX sliding plug door reefer are 18 in. rung length and 16 in. rung spacing for an eight rung ladder. The six rung ladder on the Sunshine BREX truss rod BREX reefer has 18 in. long rungs with 18 in. rung spacing. The Sunshine BREX war emergency wood side reefers seven rung ladders have 18 in. rung length and 17 in rung spacing. The latter ladders were based upon etched brass ladder stiles in the kit mastered by Bill Welch. All dimensions are based upon measurements of model ladders, which may or may not reflect the dimensions of prototype ladders. I don’t have any scale drawings of any of the BREX reefers.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bill Welch
Sent: Monday, October 01, 2018 4:52 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] BREX Reefer Ladders

 

I just looked at one of my improved Accurail reefers modeled for BREX. This one was done in my pre-ladder improvement period. For these car I used the eight-rung Detail West ladders trimmed for the appropriate length for ends and sides.

This model is based on the cars built by BRE and their two subsidiaries Colorado Southern and Fort Worth & Denver. It is basically the proposed USRA reefer but never built by the USRA.

Bill Welch


Re: Coupler lift bars.

Schuyler Larrabee
 

I think the answer is in the description:  They don’t bend (or cut) easily.  IOW, casual handling won’t result in a bent bar.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jon Miller
Sent: Monday, October 01, 2018 7:59 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Coupler lift bars.

 

On 10/1/2018 4:11 PM, Gary McMills wrote:

Tangent parts are hard steel and don't bend or cut easily.

    I'm curious why they don't make them out of brass (cost)?

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, 
SPROG, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: White toner

Jerry Michels
 

Gene,  Is the ad from Ghost White?  Jerry Michels


Re: Flatcar Load: Conning Tower Tube

Ralph W. Brown
 

Hi CJ,
 
I’m sorry, but it is not “the same thing.”  A submarine conning tower is or was a separate cylindrical chamber above and parallel to the main pressure hull and connected to it by a trunk with a heavy watertight hatch able to withstand the same pressure differentials as the pressure hull and the conning tower.  The conning tower was contained within the boat’s superstructure, specifically the fairwater, or more recently, the sail, also still called a fairwater.  “Modern” submarines generally have that fairwater or sail, but without the conning tower within.  
 
Pax,
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 

From: CJ Riley via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, October 1, 2018 7:08 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Flatcar Load: Conning Tower Tube
 
I am aware of the modern nomenclature but it's the same thing.


Re: Flatcar Load: Conning Tower Tube

Ralph W. Brown
 

Hi Ben,

No argument there. One need only look at my "stainless steel" grill to know that even some so-called "stainless" will rust. Even on surface ships, constantly exposed gun mounts get a lot of attention. The "rust-resistant" steel just takes a little less effort to keep up.

Pax,


Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com

-----Original Message-----
From: Benjamin Hom
Sent: Monday, October 1, 2018 7:49 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Flatcar Load: Conning Tower Tube

Ralph Brown wrote:
"Additionally, some deck guns, particularly the 5”/25, were made of a rust-resistant steel and pressure tight fittings, but we digress . ."
Rust resistant steel...rusts. Still need to maintenance to the weapon...if you believe otherwise, I've got some Atlas "Rebuilt USRA boxcars" to sell you.
Ben Hom


Re: Flatcar Load: Conning Tower Tube

Ralph W. Brown
 

Hi Fenton, Bruce, et al.,
 
Regarding the load, there are three drawings, including a longitudinal section, of the Missouri on the Missouri Memorial website.  The longitudinal section drawing may be found here: https://ussmissouri.org/learn-the-history/the-ship/as-built-blueprints.  If one examines this drawing, a tube labeled “Conning Tower Tube” runs vertically five decks from one deck below the main deck up to the O4 deck to the “Ship Conning Station” and the “Fire Control Station” above it.  I suspect that this F22 load is the bottom section of that tube.
 
Regarding submarine conning towers, they were typically and necessarily larger both in length and diameter.  I was assigned to the USS Skipjack (SSN-585) (“The first, the fastest, and the finest nuclear powered teardrop hull,” a great boat with a great crew) in the early 1960s, when she was part of Squadron 10 (SUBRON10), which at the time also included USS Nautilus (SSN-571), USS Sailfish (SS-572), USS Seawolf (SSN-575), USS Skate (SSN-578) and, I think, USS Halfbeak (SS-352) as she was often moored with us at the State Pier in New London.  In any event, Seawolf, unique among nuclear subs primary because of her liquid sodium cooled reactor, did as I recall also have a conning tower.  She was definitely an odd duck.
 
Pax,
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 

From: O Fenton Wells
Sent: Sunday, September 30, 2018 8:15 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Flatcar Load: Conning Tower Tube
 
The first sub I served on was the USS Amberjack (SS 522) commissioned in 1945.  Still in service in 1962.   It was the only sub I served on with a conning tower and it looked nothing like that.  Conning towers were not used on any subs after the WWII designs.  The Fast attack diesel boats in the 50's had no conning towers but they had control rooms and of course the nukes were without conning towers.
Not sure what this might be sued for.
Fenton Wells
 
 


Re: Speeder Photos Needed

Fran Giacoma
 

Bill, you might contact this group:
http://www.narcoa.org/
One or more of their members may operate SP speeders and have the info you need.
Fran Giacoma


Speeder Photos Needed

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

This request hopefully falls on the fringe of our topics but I am looking for photos of SP
MOW speeders.  This is to determine lettering and numbering options.  With all of my SP reference material this remains a mystery.

Hope someone can help.  Thanks  in advance.

Bill Pardie





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