Date   

Re: Monon Decals

Bill Welch
 

I used the kit ladders but replaced the rungs w/0.010 styrene rod for Plastruct.

Bill Welch


Re: Monon Decals

steve_wintner
 

Bills presentation leaves me a bit unclear on the ladders he used for this car, but I note Yarmouth's etched 16" 7 rung stiles look about right.

Steve


Re: Weighing Freight Car Models with Liquid Gravity

Dave Parker
 

Peter Weiglin wrote:

"Given that the smaller the shot, the denser the lead weight,"

This was also discussed previously and, unless the shot are sufficiently large to preclude close packing in the available space, the weight you can gain does not depend on the diameter of the spheres, only on the density of the metal.  See post #139844.

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA


Re: Poultry Cars

Kristin Dummler
 

Dan,

2800+ cars were in operation at their most popular.

The Ambroid kits are still out there. I have several that I have purchased to build in the last year. They are hard to come by, but around. The idea all along has been to develop a kit for building these cars. Whether laser cut wood, mixed medium, 3D printed, resin, etc.. etc.. they will not be a simple model. Especially not if truly prototypical.

Kristin D.


On 10/30/2018 4:05 PM, Daniel A. Mitchell wrote:
A Photo-Etched side might well prove the best of the several options.

The mesh will probably need to be a bit coarser than scale to avoid optical problems and still achieve adequate transparency.

The best thing about this approach is etching the entire side in one piece, slots and all. 3D etching, or a multi-layer etch could also represent the ends of the deck boards protruding through the slots. That would greatly simplify building such a model. 

One question is how many of the old Ambroid cars are still around in salvageable form? A better one might be … if the PE sides become available, would one of the resin builders market a new car kit that uses them? I think there may indeed be a market for such. It seems well over 2000 of these cars were in service at one time, pretty much all over the country. They were NOT all that rare.

Dan Mitchell
==========
On Oct 30, 2018, at 3:38 PM, Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:

A known and skilled "photo-etcher" was present for Kristin's second presentation and he signed on to consult and help her.

Bill Welch



Re: Weighing Freight Car Models with Liquid Gravity

Peter Weiglin
 

Given that the smaller the shot, the denser the lead weight, I reasoned that lead powder might offer the greatest density.
And I found that lead powder was indeed available from a golf supply house.  Seems they use lead powder to weight golf clubs.

Not available or shippable to California, I was told.  So we moved to Ohio.  (Well, there were other reasons.)

Handle with care -- but it does fill the nooks and crannies in hopper cars, etc.

Peter Weiglin


Re: Weighing Freight Car Models with Liquid Gravity

Ed
 

You also might try golf supply stores for the pourable shot they use in golf clubs.

Ed Robinson


Re: Poultry Cars

Daniel A. Mitchell
 

A Photo-Etched side might well prove the best of the several options.

The mesh will probably need to be a bit coarser than scale to avoid optical problems and still achieve adequate transparency.

The best thing about this approach is etching the entire side in one piece, slots and all. 3D etching, or a multi-layer etch could also represent the ends of the deck boards protruding through the slots. That would greatly simplify building such a model. 

One question is how many of the old Ambroid cars are still around in salvageable form? A better one might be … if the PE sides become available, would one of the resin builders market a new car kit that uses them? I think there may indeed be a market for such. It seems well over 2000 of these cars were in service at one time, pretty much all over the country. They were NOT all that rare.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Oct 30, 2018, at 3:38 PM, Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:

A known and skilled "photo-etcher" was present for Kristin's second presentation and he signed on to consult and help her.

Bill Welch


Re: Roof Query

Tim O'Connor
 


A DESPATCH roof is quite different from a Milwaukee welded roof as applied to
the Milwaukee rib sided box cars. They are easily distinguishable.

I'm not familiar with those Southern box cars, but don't confuse the DESPATCH
and Milwaukee roofs!

Tim O'Connor



As Ben Hom mentioned, Branchline made a Despatch roof in its undecorated boxcar kits that is similar to, if not indistinguishable from, the Murphy welded roof. Others have suggested a roof from a Milwaukee ribside box car that also is quite similar if not identical.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: mike turner <yardcoolie1968@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Mon, Oct 29, 2018 9:16 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Roof Query

Just confirmed Murphy Welded Roof on SOU drawing SF-5210.

Thx for the replies.

Now to try and find an HO roof of this flavor.

Mike Turner

MP-Z35

On 10/29/2018 9:43 PM, David via Groups.Io wrote:
> Murphy Welded Roof, as shown on pp. 411-412 of the 1940 CBC. The
> panels were welded together, but the roof as a whole was riveted to
> the carbody. Milwaukee did use it on their ribside boxes.
>
> David Thompson

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Poultry Cars

Bill Welch
 

A known and skilled "photo-etcher" was present for Kristin's second presentation and he signed on to consult and help her.

Bill Welch


Re: Poultry Cars

Denny Anspach <danspachmd@...>
 

Poultry Car in Petaluma: Petaluma was and has been famed as the “egg capital" of the San Francisco Bay region. In this regard, the poultry car was most probably full of inbound layers raised elsewhere. The car would have arrived on the light jointed-rail tender mercies of the NWP via either the SP via Schellville, or more gently over the waves by Santa Fe car barge via Tiburon.

Before 1937, Petaluma was also effectively isolated from principal egg-market San Francisco itself by the pre-bridge Golden Gate. As a result, Petaluma’s egg production went to market by gentle river boat, a series of night freight boats, PETALUMA I, II, OR III that loaded in Petaluma in the evening traversed Petaluma River to the Bay (under the two (2) NWP lift bridges) and then on to San Francisco to unload, reload with machinery, etc. to arrive back in Petaluma in the morning. This was the very last of the many such San Francisco Bay river boats, lasting at least into the 1960s, I believe. I recall seeing the last PETALUMA paddling it way across the bay several times in the fifties, the last, finished with engines, in terminal layup tied up to the C&H Crockett Carquinez Straits sugar refinery. When seen, the PETALUMA was always popularly pointed-out as being “full of eggs”.

I am having some difficulty attempting to fact-check my memories about river boat shipping, etc., so corrections, additions etc. are welcome!

H-mmm…excuse me now: my morning egg (probably from Petaluma) is just now….perfectly….done, ready to enjoy.

Denny

Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento CA


Re: CNJ boxcars in LA circa 1947?

bill stanton
 

thanks very much for the info




From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of brianleppert@... <brianleppert@...>
Sent: Sunday, October 28, 2018 1:55 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] CNJ boxcars in LA circa 1947?
 
There is a color photo of CNJ 21675 in the Steamscenes' 2002 Southern Pacific calender, month of September.  The 1923 ARA proposed design box car is directly behind a cab forward steam locomotive crossing the Carquinez Straits bridge near Martinez, CA.  The car has the larger "Statue of Liberty" herald.  Photographed by Donald Duke, so of coarse it's undated.

Brian Leppert
Carson City, NV


Re: Poultry Cars

Dennis Storzek
 

Reading through this discussion, I'm surprised no one has suggested photo etching. The bands of mesh could be done, complete with the frames, and depending on how the junction with the end and center compartment work out, possibly all the bands for the side could be one piece, properly spaced. Biggest problem is this is likely not a do-it-yourself etching project, as getting the mesh fine enough is going to take some technical expertise and good process control. I know there have been vent panels for "chicken wire" F units etched with acceptable results.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Roof Query

Dennis Storzek
 

The big problem with the MILW roofs is the rib side cars don't have Z bar eaves, so the roof is the full width of the body, wider than on a typical car.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Monon Decals

Scott
 

Thanks everybody I will get some ordered up.

Scott McDonald


Re: Roof Query

Richard Townsend
 

As Ben Hom mentioned, Branchline made a Despatch roof in its undecorated boxcar kits that is similar to, if not indistinguishable from, the Murphy welded roof. Others have suggested a roof from a Milwaukee ribside box car that also is quite similar if not identical.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: mike turner <yardcoolie1968@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Mon, Oct 29, 2018 9:16 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Roof Query

Just confirmed Murphy Welded Roof on SOU drawing SF-5210.

Thx for the replies.

Now to try and find an HO roof of this flavor.

Mike Turner

MP-Z35

On 10/29/2018 9:43 PM, David via Groups.Io wrote:
> Murphy Welded Roof, as shown on pp. 411-412 of the 1940 CBC. The
> panels were welded together, but the roof as a whole was riveted to
> the carbody. Milwaukee did use it on their ribside boxes.
>
> David Thompson
>




Re: Poultry Cars

O Fenton Wells
 

Just as a side note my wife gave me some sizing material that is used inside garments to stiffen things like lapels and shoulders.  I used it with good success with vent car models.  Also some floral ribbon has great HO scale promise.
Fenton

On Mon, Oct 29, 2018 at 12:53 AM Jake Schaible <jjschaible@...> wrote:

The second of Doug's images shows, without at doubt, the top screen panel on the side is significantly narrower than the standard "6 diamond" tall panel or the bottom "7 diamond" panel.  Seems to be 3.5 diamonds tall?

"Brookport" is the first suggestion of a name I've heard for that car.  There is clearly lettering above the door, but it was far to faded and light too poor for me to read.  



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Re: Roof Query

mike turner
 

Just confirmed Murphy Welded Roof on SOU drawing SF-5210.

Thx for the replies.

Now to try and find an HO roof of this flavor.

Mike Turner

MP-Z35

On 10/29/2018 9:43 PM, David via Groups.Io wrote:
Murphy Welded Roof, as shown on pp. 411-412 of the 1940 CBC. The panels were welded together, but the roof as a whole was riveted to the carbody. Milwaukee did use it on their ribside boxes.

David Thompson


Re: Poultry Cars

Steve SANDIFER
 

I have photos of poultry cars on the Santa Fe in Dodge City, KS; Ft. Madison, IA, and Winslow, AZ. I have seen photos of poultry cars in CA, but the photos did not indicate the railroads  on which they traveled.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Kristin Dummler
Sent: Monday, October 29, 2018 9:28 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Poultry Cars

 

Stuart,

I haven't seen one specifically, but that doesn't mean they weren't there. A couple of photos show cars in CA (I have one from 1945 in Sacramento, and another in Stockton.) Pacific Wholesale Poultry in Petaluma had two of their own private cars. There was a Dairy, Swine and Poultry Special that ran in 1922 on the Atchison, Topeka, And Santa Fe RR. (Attachment)  It's a good likelihood there were some that made their way south.

While not Santa Fe, others might find interest in the book the Southern Pacific released called "Success with Poultry in California". The digital version can be found here:

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.b2751859;view=1up;seq=1

 

Kristin D.

 

 

On 10/29/2018 8:55 AM, Stuart Forsyth via Groups.Io wrote:

Shifting from mesh to operations, has anyone seen photos of poultry cars running on the Santa Fe in Southern California?

 

Stuart A. Forsyth



On Oct 29, 2018, at 6:34 AM, Douglas Harding <doug.harding@...> wrote:

 

Here is an interior view of the “Brookport”. I’ll contact the person who sent me the photos and see if I can learn reason for the “Brookport” name.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Kristin Dummler
Sent: Monday, October 29, 2018 6:37 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Poultry Cars

 

Doug,

I believe you are correct. The FC Brown car was a very early design that allowed crates of birds to be stacked inside for transport. Note there is no caretaker stateroom. The crates would have been stacked floor to ceiling and, with no one to feed or water the birds, most would have lost weight, and many would have likely perished on the journey.

Excellent pictures of the car in St. Louis. I have not been able to find the car's specific name. Somewhere, I am sure there are records of what it was originally called, but once P.T.C. took over and took over the remaining cars from North American, a lot of them were just left with their original designations, such as the Palace name on the side sill. Somewhere there has to be a listing of the names of the cars. Hopefully it turns up one of these days.

Kristin D.

 

On 10/28/2018 9:46 PM, Douglas Harding wrote:

Attached are two photos of the car at the National Transportation Museum in St Louis, which I have listed as the Brookport. I don’t know if that name is correct, that is how the photos were named when they came to me. This car has eight layers of cages, the top one does a smaller “screen” on the exterior, no doubt because the fascia covered the upper part of the top cage.

 

Also attached is a very different poultry car, FC Brown #104. Which appears to be a full cage design, built by AFC in 1907. I can’t quite make out the lot #, looks like it could be 9637.

I suspect this car was designed to hold standard chicken crates. As Kristen pointed out in her presentation, farmers had a problem getting their chicken crates back, so cars of this design fell out of favor.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

Attachments:

 

 

<Brookport 1770.JPG>

 

 


Re: Weighing Freight Car Models with Liquid Gravity

Carl Gustafson
 

On Mon, Oct 29, 2018 at 10:35:54PM +0000, Andy Carlson wrote:
I would guess the mention of Titanium was a mistake, the intended metal perhaps Platinum, which is as heavy (Or heavier) than Tungsten.  Platinum, though, is incredably expensive, though its weigh rivals Tungsten and depleted uranium
So does gold, for that matter. Use that or platinum and you can have "investment grade" cars.

Carl Gustafson


Roof Query

David
 

Murphy Welded Roof, as shown on pp. 411-412 of the 1940 CBC. The panels were welded together, but the roof as a whole was riveted to the carbody. Milwaukee did use it on their ribside boxes.

David Thompson

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