Date   

Re: Floquil Glaze

James E Kubanick
 

Jerry,

I have used Floquil Glaze as a base coat for decals and Clear Clear as a topcoat as the latter seems to have a very good ability to hide the edges of thick film decals

On Friday, November 2, 2018, 5:47:26 PM EDT, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:



Jerry Michels wrote
> Curious Tim, I have returned paint to the bottle for over 40 years, and it has never been a problem.

well they do say visual acuity worsens with age...

Once I began using Scalecoat and Accupaint I never went back to Floquil for overall
paint jobs. I use it for roofs, underframes, weathering, hopper car and gondola interiors,
structures, and washes, but never when I need a glossy smooth finish. YMMV.

Tim

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Substitute for Blacken-It

Bill Welch
 

With Blacken-It no longer around, here is a substitute: https://www.megahobby.com/products/photo-etch-burnishing-fluid-ammo-of-mig-jimenez.html

Mind-boggling line of modeling finishing products.

Bill Welch


Re: Floquil Glaze

Tim O'Connor
 


Jerry Michels wrote
> Curious Tim, I have returned paint to the bottle for over 40 years, and it has never been a problem.

well they do say visual acuity worsens with age...

Once I began using Scalecoat and Accupaint I never went back to Floquil for overall
paint jobs. I use it for roofs, underframes, weathering, hopper car and gondola interiors,
structures, and washes, but never when I need a glossy smooth finish. YMMV.

Tim

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Floquil Glaze

Jerry Michels
 

Curious Tim, I have returned paint to the bottle for over 40 years, and it has never been a problem.  Some of the original jars I have with "returned" pain is still good after at least 20 years.  In fact I used some just this week.

To the question, Floquil Glaze can be added to a paint mix to give a gloss finish, or can be used on its own, sprayed on a surface to give a gloss surface for decals, and also used to blend in decals as an overcoat.  Glaze is a bit yellowish.  Floquil also made a similar product called Crystal Clear, that was completely clear.  I suppose it might have been an improvement to Glaze, but have no factual basis that is was.  

It is rather interesting to be discussing Floquil's history and uses.  Kind of makes me realize I have been in this hobby a long, long time!

Jerry Michels


RCW kit re-intros

Eric Hansmann
 

Resin Car Works announces the re-introduction of a couple kits. These have been out of production but are available again. More details can be found in the latest blog post.

http://blog.resincarworks.com/kit-re-introductions/

 

 

Eric Hansmann

RCW web guy


Re: Rapido NP boxcar, K brake question

Jon Miller <atsfus@...>
 

On 11/2/2018 7:00 AM, Matt Goodman via Groups.Io wrote:
Good to here that the screw forming and screw verticalness issues aren’t widespread.

    I have a black roof AB brake car and I would describe my truck screws as washer offset.  I don't think as bad as the picture but with 4x glasses it's offset.  Working on painting .088 wheelsets currently with other projects.

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
SPROG User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


WP PS-1 Boxcar

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Good Friends,

I am scanning up my father's and my railroad slides before the physical images go to a museum. As I was working on the enclosed image of a WP maintenance of way boxcar, I made an interesting discovery. The car is riding on what once were Chrysler trucks. The outboard snubbing mechanism is gone, but the brackets are still attached to the truck frame.

Some background: This car was from WP series 20801-20820, the first 20 cars in the larger series 20801-21400. These were PS-1 boxcars delivered in 1951. The first 20 cars were equipped by Pullman with Compartmentizer adjustable bulkheads and Chrysler trucks for high-value fragile merchandise loads (probably for Montgomery Wards in Oakland). The bodies, ends and roofs were silver-colored, and a huge orange feather ran the length of the car, crossing the door, plus the "Rides Like a Feather" slogan was in the upper right corner. In 1952 the class was renumbered as 19501-19520. Also in 1952, 22 additional cars were drawn at random from the main series and returned to Pullman for adding Compartmentizers. These cars originally came with black car cement on the ends and roofs, to which the silver paint wouldn't stick. They came back to the WP with same black ends and roofs, and also retained their ASF A-3 "Ride Control" trucks. This later group was renumbered 19521-19542. Around 1958 the silver paint was beginning to fail, and the whole class was repainted boxcar red, with a diagonal orange feather covering most of the panel to the right of the doors, and the "Rides Like a Feather" slogan below the feather at the lower right. Except for WP 3401-3410, similar 8'-door cars with DF-2 loaders, these were the only WP 40' cars to carry this scheme. These two classes of boxcars were among the last 40' boxcars on the WP, as the company bought 50' cars heavily beginning in 1954.

Fast forward to about 1980. Most of WP's remaining 40' boxcars were stretched, sold or scrapped by the 1970s, and the few remaining went into maintenance service. I came upon this car in Keddie, California on one of my last WP photo trips up the Feather River Canyon before I was posted to the East Coast by the Coast Guard. I couldn't resist a photo, but only now almost 40 years later did I notice the odd trucks while I was photoshopping out some processing debris.



Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿


Re: Rapido NP boxcar, K brake question

Matt Goodman
 

Good to here that the screw forming and screw verticalness issues aren’t widespread. By way of a visual description to go along with the cam lobe references, see attached. 



Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio

Sent from my mobile

On Nov 1, 2018, at 1:56 PM, Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:

Matt Goodman wrote:

I just picked up my pre-war model a couple of days ago. I'll paint the wheels and truck side frames, and probably replace the couplers with #58s. As Eric mentioned, the existing couplers are metal Kadee #5 replicas, with metal knuckle springs. While I'm mildly disappointed that Rapido chose to use these instead of the path Tangent has taken, I did appreciate the rust color (which included the "air" hose).

    Full agreement. The "rust" color of the couplers is too light anyway.

I had to do some tuning to the truck mounting. One truck would rock toward one side of the car body, but not the other; the other truck would rock toward toward the car center, but not toward the coupler.

      I checked my model carefully after reading this, and found no such problem on mine. I pulled out the screws and they look fine.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: Floquil Glaze (reconstitute Floquil paints)

Lester Breuer
 

Denny I do not know if Floquil glaze will reconstitute Floquil paints.   I added it to existing colors or sprayed it over Floquil colors to get a gloss base for decal application.  To reconstitute old Floquil pints I used an ultrasonic cleaner (UC). The paint had to have a little thinner left in the bottle.  I would start by just putting the old bottle of paint in the UC for a period of time to see if usable.  If not I would start adding an eye dropper of  Diosol (since off the market my mix 50% xylene and 50% toluene) and back into the UC.  I would repeat this process until I could get it usable.  I define usable as being able to brush the paint.  At times I was able to get the paint back to spray quality if strained through a nylon stocking.  It took time and patience to get it done; however, if it was the only bottle I had left it was worth the effort.
Hopes this helps.   Lester Breuer


Re: Rapido NP boxcar, K brake question

Eric Hansmann
 

Yesterday I took a closer look at the Pre-War version and noticed the running board end supports need attention. These details are crammed into place on the model and the angle of the support is lost. A builder image of the car reveals a longer support board under the ends of the running board than what is typically seen. I think the model detail is a bit to long and the support angle is minimized. I hope a little adjustment will make this better.

I have yet to remove the trucks or couplers for upgrades.


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN



On November 1, 2018 at 9:46 PM James SANDIFER <steve.sandifer@...> wrote:

I also replaced the coupler. The Kadee copy used the old style Kadee spring and mine would not center dependably. I put whisker couplers in and that problem was solved. I also painted the wheels first thing – why don’t Mfg. blacken wheelsets? I had none of the problems you describe with trucks or truck screws.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Matt Goodman via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, November 1, 2018 11:51 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Rapido NP boxcar, K brake question

 

I just picked up my pre-war model a couple of days ago. I'll paint the wheels and truck side frames, and probably replace the couplers with #58s. As Eric mentioned, the existing couplers are metal Kadee #5 replicas, with metal knuckle springs. While I'm mildly disappointed that Rapido chose to use these instead of the path Tangent has taken, I did appreciate the rust color (which included the "air" hose).

 

I had to do some tuning to the truck mounting. One truck would rock toward one side of the car body, but not the other; the other truck would rock toward toward the car center, but not toward the coupler.

 

The root cause was twofold. The first issue was with the mounting screws themselves - which were poorly formed. The screw head and washer are a single part, but the washer is not concentric with the head - think of a cam lobe. I fiddled with the location of the lobe until I found a location that allowed the truck to rock equally in most directions.

 

The second issue was one of the screws was driven in crooked.  The fiddling described above also mitigated this issue.

 

Although both were easily overcome, these two quality issues were disappointing given the cost of the model. The screw shape issue especially seems like it would be easy to fix - better screws!

 

 

Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio

 

 

On Friday, October 26, 2018, 12:25:16 PM EDT, Eric Hansmann <eric@...> wrote:

 

 

Yes. I got a four-pack of the Pre-War cars. Three of them will be sent to others modeling the 1920s and 1930s. Out of the box, these models look downright amazing.

 

In a quick overview I noticed a couple of things.

 

- The models have a 1937 reweigh date. NP lettering was spartan so a paint out and a 1925 or 1926 reweigh date will be an easy fix.

- The stencil on the air reservoir on the brake casting is upside down, which made me chuckle. It's hard to read as it is.

- The model has two grabs on the left end of the car sides. The uppermost grab will need to be removed for a pre-1930 appearance. Rapido only had one basic version made and used different paint and lettering styles.

- The models are equipped with a metal Kadee-like coupler that I will change out to a preferred Accurail Proto:HO coupler.

- The wheels will need to be painted.

 

 

I was told at RPM Chicagoland that the basic car represents the rebuilt version so the sheathing is not reflective of the original center-bead board. This is difficult to see at a 12-inch view. It will be a pretty quick addition to my 1926 fleet.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io ] On Behalf Of Alexander Schneider Jr
Sent: Thursday, October 25, 2018 11:26 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Rapido NP boxcar, K brake question

 

I received mine, and I have a question about the K brake system. I don’t see any connection between the lever on the “A” end and the rest of the system. My 1928 Car Builders Cyclopedia shows a connecting rod between the two levers. I can’t imagine it would be between the underframe channels. Any ideas?

 

Alex Schneider

 

,_

 



 


 




Re: Floquil Glaze

Mark Vinski
 

I believe glaze was meant to be added to Floquil paint to produce a glossy finish I have used it that way.

Mark Vinski


Re: Rapido NP boxcar, K brake question

Steve SANDIFER
 

I also replaced the coupler. The Kadee copy used the old style Kadee spring and mine would not center dependably. I put whisker couplers in and that problem was solved. I also painted the wheels first thing – why don’t Mfg. blacken wheelsets? I had none of the problems you describe with trucks or truck screws.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Matt Goodman via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, November 1, 2018 11:51 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Rapido NP boxcar, K brake question

 

I just picked up my pre-war model a couple of days ago. I'll paint the wheels and truck side frames, and probably replace the couplers with #58s. As Eric mentioned, the existing couplers are metal Kadee #5 replicas, with metal knuckle springs. While I'm mildly disappointed that Rapido chose to use these instead of the path Tangent has taken, I did appreciate the rust color (which included the "air" hose).

 

I had to do some tuning to the truck mounting. One truck would rock toward one side of the car body, but not the other; the other truck would rock toward toward the car center, but not toward the coupler.

 

The root cause was twofold. The first issue was with the mounting screws themselves - which were poorly formed. The screw head and washer are a single part, but the washer is not concentric with the head - think of a cam lobe. I fiddled with the location of the lobe until I found a location that allowed the truck to rock equally in most directions.

 

The second issue was one of the screws was driven in crooked.  The fiddling described above also mitigated this issue.

 

Although both were easily overcome, these two quality issues were disappointing given the cost of the model. The screw shape issue especially seems like it would be easy to fix - better screws!

 

 

Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio

 

 

On Friday, October 26, 2018, 12:25:16 PM EDT, Eric Hansmann <eric@...> wrote:

 

 

Yes. I got a four-pack of the Pre-War cars. Three of them will be sent to others modeling the 1920s and 1930s. Out of the box, these models look downright amazing.

 

In a quick overview I noticed a couple of things.

 

- The models have a 1937 reweigh date. NP lettering was spartan so a paint out and a 1925 or 1926 reweigh date will be an easy fix.

- The stencil on the air reservoir on the brake casting is upside down, which made me chuckle. It's hard to read as it is.

- The model has two grabs on the left end of the car sides. The uppermost grab will need to be removed for a pre-1930 appearance. Rapido only had one basic version made and used different paint and lettering styles.

- The models are equipped with a metal Kadee-like coupler that I will change out to a preferred Accurail Proto:HO coupler.

- The wheels will need to be painted.

 

 

I was told at RPM Chicagoland that the basic car represents the rebuilt version so the sheathing is not reflective of the original center-bead board. This is difficult to see at a 12-inch view. It will be a pretty quick addition to my 1926 fleet.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io ] On Behalf Of Alexander Schneider Jr
Sent: Thursday, October 25, 2018 11:26 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Rapido NP boxcar, K brake question

 

I received mine, and I have a question about the K brake system. I don’t see any connection between the lever on the “A” end and the rest of the system. My 1928 Car Builders Cyclopedia shows a connecting rod between the two levers. I can’t imagine it would be between the underframe channels. Any ideas?

 

Alex Schneider

 

,_


New Kadee Parts

Bill Welch
 

I notice that Kadee has now added their two new Running board types, Morton and Gypsum, to their website. Will someone please remind me of the new brake wheels they are also doing?

Thank you,
Bill Welch


Re: Floquil Glaze

Tim O'Connor
 


Because Floquil is an enamel, it can slowly polymerize in the bottle... this is what
causes the graininess. It also happens to acrylic enamels. In each case the best way
to prevent it is to measure out the paint you're going to use, and throw out any left
overs, and never return any paint to the original bottle.

But, absent those problems, then adding thinner should make it flow again. A couple
drops of retarder helps too.

When the paint gets grainy I keep them but only as brush paint and washes for weathering.
Never try to airbrush them. It won't be pretty!

Tim O'



I have a stash of this material, which at one time was identified as Floquil paint without any pigment, i.e. only the carrier and solvent.  Does anyone know whether or not this is true?  

If so, I am wondering whether or notGlaze  could be used to reconstitute Floquil paints that seemed to be too  reduced  by evaporation (how does that happen when the lid is on right….?).  I have been successful in soome instances by just adding solvent (lacquer thinner or Diosol), but too often this ends up with a degraded grainy paint.  I am very much aware that older Floquil paints craze styrene. Of course, I could simply try and see what happens.

I find that the older more colorful Floquil paints still have their good uses.

Denny S. Anspach, MD

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Floquil Glaze

Denny Anspach <danspachmd@...>
 

I have a stash of this material, which at one time was identified as Floquil paint without any pigment, i.e. only the carrier and solvent. Does anyone know whether or not this is true?

If so, I am wondering whether or notGlaze could be used to reconstitute Floquil paints that seemed to be too reduced by evaporation (how does that happen when the lid is on right….?). I have been successful in some instances by just adding solvent (lacquer thinner or Diosol), but too often this ends up with a degraded grainy paint. I am very much aware that older Floquil paints craze styrene. Of course, I could simply try and see what happens.

I find that the older more colorful Floquil paints still have their good uses.

Denny

Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento, CA 95864


Broach for Freight Car building

Lester Breuer
 

As I was working on a resin Speedwitch Media Northern Pacific Flat Car kit I reached in the drawer for a broach to remove the flash from the stake pockets.   If you on not familiar with a broach  and are interested in seeing one and learning a few freight car modeling uses I have  posted photos and a quick read writeup on my blog for modeling projects on the Minneapolis & Northland Railroad Company.   If you are interested in viewing photos take a look at the following:
 
 
Lester Breuer


Re: Rapido NP boxcar, K brake question

Tony Thompson
 

Matt Goodman wrote:

I just picked up my pre-war model a couple of days ago. I'll paint the wheels and truck side frames, and probably replace the couplers with #58s. As Eric mentioned, the existing couplers are metal Kadee #5 replicas, with metal knuckle springs. While I'm mildly disappointed that Rapido chose to use these instead of the path Tangent has taken, I did appreciate the rust color (which included the "air" hose).

    Full agreement. The "rust" color of the couplers is too light anyway.

I had to do some tuning to the truck mounting. One truck would rock toward one side of the car body, but not the other; the other truck would rock toward toward the car center, but not toward the coupler.

      I checked my model carefully after reading this, and found no such problem on mine. I pulled out the screws and they look fine.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: Poultry Cars

Stuart Forsyth
 

Great info, Jake.

My theory is the first drives would have been to Escondido, CA, some 15 miles away, down the San Pasquale Valley.

That seems like a long way for a turkey to trott…

Best wishes,

Stuart

Stuart A. Forsyth

On Oct 29, 2018, at 9:09 AM, Jake Schaible <jjschaible@...> wrote:

Stuart,

While I have yet to locate photos of poultry cars loaded on the Santa Fe in SoCal, I feel it is highly likely... at least in the 1920 & 1930 with Thanksgiving turkeys from Ramona. 

Ramona, CA was once known as the "turkey capital of the world" and I learned they originally had annual "turkey drives" where the town would get together to drive flocks "to the station".   This informal parade & season ending celebration evolved and by 1933 the event was formalized and popular with tourists till the last one in 1941 as WW2 cancelled the event.  At some point, the turkey drives died out, replaced by trucking.  

Live turkey from Ramona were shipped all over the US.  There is a local rumor that President Woodrow Wilson once pardoned a Ramona turkey at the White House, but others think it was Truman and still others think it was neither.  But the real mystery to me is what "station" was the destination of the original Ramona drives, as the town isn't on the track.  My theory is the first drives would have been to Escondido, CA, some 15 miles away, down the San Pasquale Valley.  

I'll make some calls to see if I can confirm...

 
 
 
 


Re: Poultry Cars

Stuart Forsyth
 

Thanks, Kristin!

Stuart A. Forsyth

On Oct 29, 2018, at 7:27 AM, Kristin Dummler <kbdummler@...> wrote:

Stuart, 

I haven't seen one specifically, but that doesn't mean they weren't there. A couple of photos show cars in CA (I have one from 1945 in Sacramento, and another in Stockton.) Pacific Wholesale Poultry in Petaluma had two of their own private cars. There was a Dairy, Swine and Poultry Special that ran in 1922 on the Atchison, Topeka, And Santa Fe RR. (Attachment)  It's a good likelihood there were some that made their way south. 

While not Santa Fe, others might find interest in the book the Southern Pacific released called "Success with Poultry in California". The digital version can be found here: 

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.b2751859;view=1up;seq=1


Kristin D. 



On 10/29/2018 8:55 AM, Stuart Forsyth via Groups.Io wrote:
Shifting from mesh to operations, has anyone seen photos of poultry cars running on the Santa Fe in Southern California?

Stuart A. Forsyth

On Oct 29, 2018, at 6:34 AM, Douglas Harding <doug.harding@...> wrote:

Here is an interior view of the “Brookport”. I’ll contact the person who sent me the photos and see if I can learn reason for the “Brookport” name.
 
Doug  Harding
 
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Kristin Dummler
Sent: Monday, October 29, 2018 6:37 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Poultry Cars
 

Doug,

I believe you are correct. The FC Brown car was a very early design that allowed crates of birds to be stacked inside for transport. Note there is no caretaker stateroom. The crates would have been stacked floor to ceiling and, with no one to feed or water the birds, most would have lost weight, and many would have likely perished on the journey. 

Excellent pictures of the car in St. Louis. I have not been able to find the car's specific name. Somewhere, I am sure there are records of what it was originally called, but once P.T.C. took over and took over the remaining cars from North American, a lot of them were just left with their original designations, such as the Palace name on the side sill. Somewhere there has to be a listing of the names of the cars. Hopefully it turns up one of these days. 

Kristin D. 

 
On 10/28/2018 9:46 PM, Douglas Harding wrote:
Attached are two photos of the car at the National Transportation Museum in St Louis, which I have listed as the Brookport. I don’t know if that name is correct, that is how the photos were named when they came to me. This car has eight layers of cages, the top one does a smaller “screen” on the exterior, no doubt because the fascia covered the upper part of the top cage.
 
Also attached is a very different poultry car, FC Brown #104. Which appears to be a full cage design, built by AFC in 1907. I can’t quite make out the lot #, looks like it could be 9637.
I suspect this car was designed to hold standard chicken crates. As Kristen pointed out in her presentation, farmers had a problem getting their chicken crates back, so cars of this design fell out of favor.
 
Doug  Harding

Attachments:

 

<Brookport 1770.JPG>


<1922 - Atchison, Topeka, And Santa Fe RR.jpg>


Re: Rapido NP boxcar, K brake question

Matt Goodman
 

I just picked up my pre-war model a couple of days ago. I'll paint the wheels and truck side frames, and probably replace the couplers with #58s. As Eric mentioned, the existing couplers are metal Kadee #5 replicas, with metal knuckle springs. While I'm mildly disappointed that Rapido chose to use these instead of the path Tangent has taken, I did appreciate the rust color (which included the "air" hose).

I had to do some tuning to the truck mounting. One truck would rock toward one side of the car body, but not the other; the other truck would rock toward toward the car center, but not toward the coupler.

The root cause was twofold. The first issue was with the mounting screws themselves - which were poorly formed. The screw head and washer are a single part, but the washer is not concentric with the head - think of a cam lobe. I fiddled with the location of the lobe until I found a location that allowed the truck to rock equally in most directions.

The second issue was one of the screws was driven in crooked.  The fiddling described above also mitigated this issue.

Although both were easily overcome, these two quality issues were disappointing given the cost of the model. The screw shape issue especially seems like it would be easy to fix - better screws!


Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio


On Friday, October 26, 2018, 12:25:16 PM EDT, Eric Hansmann <eric@...> wrote:


Yes. I got a four-pack of the Pre-War cars. Three of them will be sent to others modeling the 1920s and 1930s. Out of the box, these models look downright amazing.

 

In a quick overview I noticed a couple of things.

 

- The models have a 1937 reweigh date. NP lettering was spartan so a paint out and a 1925 or 1926 reweigh date will be an easy fix.

- The stencil on the air reservoir on the brake casting is upside down, which made me chuckle. It's hard to read as it is.

- The model has two grabs on the left end of the car sides. The uppermost grab will need to be removed for a pre-1930 appearance. Rapido only had one basic version made and used different paint and lettering styles.

- The models are equipped with a metal Kadee-like coupler that I will change out to a preferred Accurail Proto:HO coupler.

- The wheels will need to be painted.

 

 

I was told at RPM Chicagoland that the basic car represents the rebuilt version so the sheathing is not reflective of the original center-bead board. This is difficult to see at a 12-inch view. It will be a pretty quick addition to my 1926 fleet.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io ] On Behalf Of Alexander Schneider Jr
Sent: Thursday, October 25, 2018 11:26 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Rapido NP boxcar, K brake question

 

I received mine, and I have a question about the K brake system. I don’t see any connection between the lever on the “A” end and the rest of the system. My 1928 Car Builders Cyclopedia shows a connecting rod between the two levers. I can’t imagine it would be between the underframe channels. Any ideas?

 

Alex Schneider

 

,_

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