Date   

Re: Foobies

A&Y Dave in MD
 

No one is allowed to refer to Museum quality accurate replicas of steam era freight cars as “troobies”...not even a helium car.

Sent from Dave Bott' iPhone

On Nov 8, 2018, at 2:45 PM, Dave Parker via Groups.Io <spottab@...> wrote:

Wow!  Talk about a wandering thread.

The original query concerned the origin of the term "foobie" to describe something "non-prototype".

Two members advanced the theory, without any tangible evidence, that "foobie" is somehow derived from FUBAR, a widely understood acronym that has been around for something like 75 years.

Bruce Smith and I basically said, not so fast.  Non-functioning links to the Urban Dictionary aside, a 10-second search with Google for "foobie definition" yields only one solid result:  a contraction of fake and boobie (i.e., augmented breasts).

This definition makes perfect sense in the context of the original query.  A foobie is attractive, appealing because it seems to be authentic.  But it's not.  It's fake, false, faux.  Sometimes subtly, other times more obviously.  But it is not FUBAR, unless it is a particularly egregious foobie

The only connection that I can find between foobie and FUBAR is that computer nerds occasionally use the former as shorthand for an audio program called foobar2000 or foobar2k (description can be found in Wikipedia).

With luck, maybe we can terminate this thread soon.

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA


Re: Foobies

Dave Parker
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:

Foobie caught on here.

Undeniably, but I think the original question was where did the term come from?

Unfortunately, the OED doesn't contain an entry for foobie (or fooby or phoobie).  There was a website called foobies.com that dates to 2006.  It very much had to do with female anatomy.  You can read about it here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fark

BTW, the foobies domain name is for sale if anybody wants to acquire it and repurpose it for the RPM community.

And, for the military history buffs, the OED gives the first known usage of FUBAR as a quote from Yank magazine, in January of 1944.  Apparently there was a FUBAR squadron.  (And maybe the kid in Private Ryan should be forgiven for not knowing the term?)

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA


Re: Foobies

Dennis Storzek
 

On Thu, Nov 8, 2018 at 10:37 AM, Rod Miller wrote:
When the computer crashed, the status it would display
was the number F00 (F zero zero), which probably quickly
became the word FOO.
At risk of extending this discussion even more, I propose that the hexidecimal number F00 was chosen for the error code specifically because it spelled FOO. Read HERE for more on the history of foo.

I happen to be of the mind that foobie derived as a contraction of FAKE and BOOBIE, but also see it likely as a combination of FOO and BOOBIE.

More than you wanted to know, I'm sure.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Foobies

Benjamin Hom
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:
"Foobie caught on here."

Bah.  Take it away, Senator Vreenak:

Now can we please get back to freight cars?


Ben Hom


Re: Foobies

Tim O'Connor
 


"I'd like to have the last word" Dave Parker writes
 > With luck, maybe we can terminate this thread soon.

I think this is simply a job only the Oxford English Dictionary can resolve.
Their job is to uncover the very first known use of words. Some words are derived
from other words, but some just appear out of a writer's imagination, and they
catch on.

Foobie caught on here. I have 755 saved emails with the term "foobie" after it first
appeared on the MFCL in 2007. It made its first appearance on STMFC in 2008. It is much
more popular on MFCL - 329 occurrences versus 142 on STMFC. In 2015, there were just
TWO occurences, both on MFCL. Was there a new product drought in 2015, or was every
model that year an accurate prototype replica? I dunno. (Disclaimer: the numbers only
reflect emails I considered to be worth saving, or maybe I just never got around to
reading them. There could be many more appearances of the term out there in the email
ether.)

Tim O'Connor



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: SFRD reefers (was Intermountain Announces Foobies)

Tony Thompson
 

I should add that PFE was not "occasionally " short of cars, but used "foreigns" much of the year. By peak harvest season, fully a fourth of their loads were in foreign cars, many of them ART, despite having by far the largest reefer fleet in North America.
Tony Thompson 


On Nov 8, 2018, at 7:09 PM, Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:

I'm sure Richard never said SFRD was "preferred" for any PFE use. Perhaps he said something that was misunderstood. Both PFE and SFRD tried quite hard NOT to load each other's cars, but mutually returned them empty. Richard had much data about the Santa Fe side of this, which  is why I'm sure he never said what was attributed.
Tony Thompson 


On Nov 8, 2018, at 2:21 PM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Jeff

Likewise I wasn't trying to contradict you. But I have plenty of data points without
the help of conductors' lists - they're called PHOTOGRAPHS. :-);-)

LOTS of Overland route photos show foreign reefers. And I have dozens of photos of
private reefers (mostly meat reefers) on the SP in California, as well as photos of
NWX, FGEX, URTX, ART, BAR (lots of these esp post 1960), NRC (mostly post 1960).
The rarest on the SP (in California) seem to be NP and WFEX.


 I didn't say it, but the data I posted was all from the Overland Route.  I don't say that this confirms or contradicts your statement; I'm saying that modelers of that route now have some data to make a judgement.
 I do assert that a realistic train of "solid" PFE reefers ought to have some non-PFE cars in it.  The modeler's idea of a veritable unit train of PFE cars is a generalization and not actually true.
 Regards,
 -Jeff


  > I'll leave it to the UP modelers to decide for themselves if an SFRD reefer is essential or not.
  > - Jeff Aley

 On the Overland route (Roseville-Ogden-Cheyenne-Omaha) I expect SFRD reefers would be relatively rare (maybe < 1 in 100) but in terminal areas near big cities, possibly much more common. And ATSF might have turned over more than a few SFRD reefers to UP for haulage up the LA&SL for delivery to Utah or other destinations in that direction. People forget that MP (ART) loaded more reefers in Texas than either PFE or ATSF, and produce loaded on any of those roads in Texas could easily end up on other railroads for delivery to destinations not reached by the originating road.
 I guess I'm saying that each layout has to consider where the cars are coming from, and going to, on THAT layout, and then let the cards fall where they may.


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: SFRD reefers (was Intermountain Announces Foobies)

Tony Thompson
 

I'm sure Richard never said SFRD was "preferred" for any PFE use. Perhaps he said something that was misunderstood. Both PFE and SFRD tried quite hard NOT to load each other's cars, but mutually returned them empty. Richard had much data about the Santa Fe side of this, which  is why I'm sure he never said what was attributed.
Tony Thompson 


On Nov 8, 2018, at 2:21 PM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Jeff

Likewise I wasn't trying to contradict you. But I have plenty of data points without
the help of conductors' lists - they're called PHOTOGRAPHS. :-);-)

LOTS of Overland route photos show foreign reefers. And I have dozens of photos of
private reefers (mostly meat reefers) on the SP in California, as well as photos of
NWX, FGEX, URTX, ART, BAR (lots of these esp post 1960), NRC (mostly post 1960).
The rarest on the SP (in California) seem to be NP and WFEX.


 I didn't say it, but the data I posted was all from the Overland Route.  I don't say that this confirms or contradicts your statement; I'm saying that modelers of that route now have some data to make a judgement.
 I do assert that a realistic train of "solid" PFE reefers ought to have some non-PFE cars in it.  The modeler's idea of a veritable unit train of PFE cars is a generalization and not actually true.
 Regards,
 -Jeff


  > I'll leave it to the UP modelers to decide for themselves if an SFRD reefer is essential or not.
  > - Jeff Aley

 On the Overland route (Roseville-Ogden-Cheyenne-Omaha) I expect SFRD reefers would be relatively rare (maybe < 1 in 100) but in terminal areas near big cities, possibly much more common. And ATSF might have turned over more than a few SFRD reefers to UP for haulage up the LA&SL for delivery to Utah or other destinations in that direction. People forget that MP (ART) loaded more reefers in Texas than either PFE or ATSF, and produce loaded on any of those roads in Texas could easily end up on other railroads for delivery to destinations not reached by the originating road.
 I guess I'm saying that each layout has to consider where the cars are coming from, and going to, on THAT layout, and then let the cards fall where they may.


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Foobies

Dave Parker
 

Nelson:

Your point is well-taken, but I think it's important to remember that one modeler's FUBAR could be another's foobie, or another's stand-in, or even another's PAM (perfectly acceptable model).

Personal standards seem to vary widely, even within this august group.

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA


Roof Color on FGE Series 38875-38499 Reefers?

Nelson Moyer
 

The series mentioned above consisted of post-war steel cars built in 1946 to the wartime specifications for plywood and T&G reefers. Roofs were Murphy rectangular panel type and ends were 4/4 Dreadnaught. I have photos of FGEX 38387, 38415m and 38491, plus WFEX 66703 (built to the same plans). I can’t tell for sure from the photos, but the roofs appear not to be painted (galvanized steel), and the Apex steel running boards were definitely not painted as I can see the paint separation line where the end color overspray painted the ends of the running boards, or in some cases just the brackets were painted brown and the running board was unpainted to the ends. The article on these cars in RPC Volume 12 states that aluminum color roofs first appeared around 1951. Were the roofs of all four of these car numbers brown or unpainted (aluminum color) as built? I think the WFEX car roof is unpainted, as they had aluminum color roofs earlier than FGE, but I’m not sure. If the roofs were painted, can anyone confirm that the Apex running boards were unpainted.

 

Nelson Moyer

 


Re: Foobies

Nelson Moyer
 

Actually, the acronym better describes what Intermountain is about to do.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of BRIAN PAUL EHNI
Sent: Thursday, November 08, 2018 12:36 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Foobies

 

Nope. That link says it’s a mashup of “fake” and “boobie”

 

 

Thanks!
--
Brian Ehni

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Nelson Moyer <npmoyer@...>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, November 8, 2018 at 11:41 AM
To: "main@RealSTMFC.groups.io" <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Foobies

 

FUBAR is an acronym  for F#@&8! Up Beyond All Recognition. The link to Urban Dictionary didn’t ‘t work for me, but it probably says the same thing.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bruce Smith
Sent: Thursday, November 08, 2018 9:21 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Foobies

 

Interesting, and not the story I was told… I think that there is a second etymology for the term “foobie” coming from a contraction of “fake” and “boobie”, and referring to silicone breast implants. This view is supported by the Urban Dictionary

 

Regards

Bruce

 

Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."

 


Re: Foobies

Dave Parker
 

Wow!  Talk about a wandering thread.

The original query concerned the origin of the term "foobie" to describe something "non-prototype".

Two members advanced the theory, without any tangible evidence, that "foobie" is somehow derived from FUBAR, a widely understood acronym that has been around for something like 75 years.

Bruce Smith and I basically said, not so fast.  Non-functioning links to the Urban Dictionary aside, a 10-second search with Google for "foobie definition" yields only one solid result:  a contraction of fake and boobie (i.e., augmented breasts).

This definition makes perfect sense in the context of the original query.  A foobie is attractive, appealing because it seems to be authentic.  But it's not.  It's fake, false, faux.  Sometimes subtly, other times more obviously.  But it is not FUBAR, unless it is a particularly egregious foobie

The only connection that I can find between foobie and FUBAR is that computer nerds occasionally use the former as shorthand for an audio program called foobar2000 or foobar2k (description can be found in Wikipedia).

With luck, maybe we can terminate this thread soon.

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA


Re: Foobies

Marty McGuirk
 

During WWII the military had Warner Brothers produce a series of cartoon training shorts featuring a character named Private Snafu (yet another acronym, Situation Normal, All Fouled<sic> Up!)


In the one of these cartoons Three Brothers, it is revealed that Snafu has two brothers, a carrier pigeon keeper named Tarfu and a dog trainer named Fubar.


So the term certainly predates the urban dictionary reference. 


The Navy usage of the term may be earlier than WWII - and refer to a Chief Petty Officer's fouled anchor insignia as a commentary on that particular Chief's abilities or lack thereof... but that's another story. 


Marty McGuirk

On November 8, 2018 at 1:51 PM mopacfirst <ron.merrick@...> wrote:

The term FUBAR was in wide use when I came into the construction industry in the mid-70s, and mostly used by older guys, which is an indicator that it originated with the generation previous.  I've also read, starting about that time, definitions of the term which all said it originated in World War II.  It was definitely not new in that mid-70s period.

Other explanations certainly could be true also, but in parallel with this one.

Ron Merrick
just an engineer, not a real linguist


Re: Foobies

Brent Greer
 

If Bruce's definition is correct,  then I appreciate foobies more now than I did prior to this discussion!

Lol

________________________________
Dr. J. Brent Greer


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Bruce Smith <smithbf@...>
Sent: Thursday, November 8, 2018 10:20:59 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Foobies
 
Interesting, and not the story I was told… I think that there is a second etymology for the term “foobie” coming from a contraction of “fake” and “boobie”, and referring to silicone breast implants. This view is supported by the Urban Dictionary

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."




On Nov 8, 2018, at 4:41 AM, Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:

Well known, from FUBAR. Look it up for full story.
Tony Thompson 


On Nov 8, 2018, at 3:30 AM, m repka via Groups.Io <mikerepka@...> wrote:

Wonder who came up with that strange description of something non-prototype? Mike R.


Re: Foobies

mopacfirst
 

The term FUBAR was in wide use when I came into the construction industry in the mid-70s, and mostly used by older guys, which is an indicator that it originated with the generation previous.  I've also read, starting about that time, definitions of the term which all said it originated in World War II.  It was definitely not new in that mid-70s period.

Other explanations certainly could be true also, but in parallel with this one.

Ron Merrick
just an engineer, not a real linguist


Re: Foobies

Rod Miller
 

I read somewhere that the term FOO originated on
the MIT model railroad club. The club used computers
that had (old days) simple displays of status using
3 hexidecimal digits (0-9 A-F for a range of 16 digits)
to indicate status.

When the computer crashed, the status it would display
was the number F00 (F zero zero), which probably quickly
became the word FOO.

--
Rod Miller
Handcraftsman
===
Custom 2-rail O Scale Models: Drives, | O Scale/S Scale West/Narrow Gauge West
Repairs, Steam Loco Building, More | 2019 O Scale National Convention
http://www.rodmiller.com | 2019 Dates Are May 23 - 25
| http://www.oscalewest.com


Re: Foobies

 

Nope. That link says it’s a mashup of “fake” and “boobie”

 

 

Thanks!
--
Brian Ehni

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Nelson Moyer <npmoyer@...>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, November 8, 2018 at 11:41 AM
To: "main@RealSTMFC.groups.io" <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Foobies

 

FUBAR is an acronym  for F#@&8! Up Beyond All Recognition. The link to Urban Dictionary didn’t ‘t work for me, but it probably says the same thing.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bruce Smith
Sent: Thursday, November 08, 2018 9:21 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Foobies

 

Interesting, and not the story I was told… I think that there is a second etymology for the term “foobie” coming from a contraction of “fake” and “boobie”, and referring to silicone breast implants. This view is supported by the Urban Dictionary

 

Regards

Bruce

 

Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."

 


Re: Foobies

Nelson Moyer
 

FUBAR is an acronym  for F#@&8! Up Beyond All Recognition. The link to Urban Dictionary didn’t ‘t work for me, but it probably says the same thing.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bruce Smith
Sent: Thursday, November 08, 2018 9:21 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Foobies

 

Interesting, and not the story I was told… I think that there is a second etymology for the term “foobie” coming from a contraction of “fake” and “boobie”, and referring to silicone breast implants. This view is supported by the Urban Dictionary

 

Regards

Bruce

 

Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."

 


Re: SFRD reefers (was Intermountain Announces Foobies)

Tim O'Connor
 

Jeff

Likewise I wasn't trying to contradict you. But I have plenty of data points without
the help of conductors' lists - they're called PHOTOGRAPHS. :-);-)

LOTS of Overland route photos show foreign reefers. And I have dozens of photos of
private reefers (mostly meat reefers) on the SP in California, as well as photos of
NWX, FGEX, URTX, ART, BAR (lots of these esp post 1960), NRC (mostly post 1960).
The rarest on the SP (in California) seem to be NP and WFEX.


 I didn't say it, but the data I posted was all from the Overland Route.  I don't say that this confirms or contradicts your statement; I'm saying that modelers of that route now have some data to make a judgement.
 I do assert that a realistic train of "solid" PFE reefers ought to have some non-PFE cars in it.  The modeler's idea of a veritable unit train of PFE cars is a generalization and not actually true.
 Regards,
 -Jeff


  > I'll leave it to the UP modelers to decide for themselves if an SFRD reefer is essential or not.
  > - Jeff Aley

 On the Overland route (Roseville-Ogden-Cheyenne-Omaha) I expect SFRD reefers would be relatively rare (maybe < 1 in 100) but in terminal areas near big cities, possibly much more common. And ATSF might have turned over more than a few SFRD reefers to UP for haulage up the LA&SL for delivery to Utah or other destinations in that direction. People forget that MP (ART) loaded more reefers in Texas than either PFE or ATSF, and produce loaded on any of those roads in Texas could easily end up on other railroads for delivery to destinations not reached by the originating road.
 I guess I'm saying that each layout has to consider where the cars are coming from, and going to, on THAT layout, and then let the cards fall where they may.


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Foobies

Tim O'Connor
 


 > Wonder who came up with that strange description of something non-prototype? Mike R.

Mike

The very first reference I have is an email from June 4, 2007. I have a huge
archive of emails going back more than 20 years, and that is the earliest one.
After that, the word appears quite frequently.

Sometimes a word appears that we knew we needed but we didn't know what it was
until we saw it.

Tim O'Connor

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: SFRD reefers (was Intermountain Announces Foobies)

Aley, Jeff A
 

Tim,

I didn't say it, but the data I posted was all from the Overland Route. I don't say that this confirms or contradicts your statement; I'm saying that modelers of that route now have some data to make a judgement.

I do assert that a realistic train of "solid" PFE reefers ought to have some non-PFE cars in it. The modeler's idea of a veritable unit train of PFE cars is a generalization and not actually true.

Regards,

-Jeff

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tim O'Connor
Sent: Wednesday, November 07, 2018 6:01 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] SFRD reefers (was Intermountain Announces Foobies)


> I'll leave it to the UP modelers to decide for themselves if an SFRD reefer is essential or not.
> - Jeff Aley

On the Overland route (Roseville-Ogden-Cheyenne-Omaha) I expect SFRD reefers would be relatively rare (maybe < 1 in 100) but in terminal areas near big cities, possibly much more common. And ATSF might have turned over more than a few SFRD reefers to UP for haulage up the LA&SL for delivery to Utah or other destinations in that direction. People forget that MP (ART) loaded more reefers in Texas than either PFE or ATSF, and produce loaded on any of those roads in Texas could easily end up on other railroads for delivery to destinations not reached by the originating road.

I guess I'm saying that each layout has to consider where the cars are coming from, and going to, on THAT layout, and then let the cards fall where they may.



--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*

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