Date   

Re: Interesting Boxcar

rwitt_2000
 

On Mon, Nov 26, 2018 at 04:56 AM, Garth Groff wrote:
These were Pullman-built, circa 1952 or so, and were 10' IH, likely the only 50' low-height PS-1s ever built.
Apparently not all followed the PS-1 design. Attached is a PS builders photo for the Navy car as well as an earlier design with "car builders" ends. I recall some earlier box cars used the the Victoria Station restaurant in Indianapolis, Indiana with Dreadnaught ends. All these 50-ft cars had 10-ft door openings.

A Google search yielded few useful results. I thought there was a group preserving information on the DOD freight car fleet.

Bob Witt


T&P Single Sheathed Boxcar 30570

gary laakso
 

What is the build date on this boxcar and how tall is it:

 

http://www.texaspacificrailway.org/rolling-stock/texas-and-pacific-railway-rolling-stock-30570-image-1158.html 

 

It appears to be tall enough to be a war emergency boxcar, though it is not. 

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock


Re: On the Workbench

bigfourroad
 

That V-10 built up into a really nice looking car.  Like to see the decaled model when done. 
They were only 8'6" interior height as you will probably see on the decals.
BTW there is a color picture of a V-10 on page 66 of Paul Faulk's SAL a Color Guide to Freight and Passenger Equipment but after it had received plywood siding instead of the individual boards.
At one time SAL had 10,000 of these and for reasons lost in time began an aggressive rebuilding program in the late 40's and early 50's that gave them another decade of life.
Chris Rooney


Re: Dental tool or “picks”

Daniel A. Mitchell
 

If you’re on good terms with your dentist, you might get some used ones for free. Many are double-ended. When one end breaks or gets badly worn the dentist may scrap it.

Better than the picks are the little chisels. These come in various sizes and with straight and bent shanks …all are useful. They’re similar to the ones Micro-Mark sells, but of better quality. They carve plastic with ease, and even work on softer metals.

Dan MItchell
==========

On Nov 26, 2018, at 10:11 AM, Paul Doggett via Groups.Io <paul.doggett2472@...> wrote:

Lester 

That’s an interesting article I have built the Speedwitch NP flat and have another one to build.
I will start looking for dental picks a good idea.

Paul Doggett England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 


On 26 Nov 2018, at 14:59, Lester Breuer <rforailroad@...> wrote:

I use dental tools or “picks” to help build every freight car I do.  And, a dental pick can be made into a removable load tool you see in the attached photo.  The photos and writeup of various types and ways I use them when building a freight car are on my blog I started to share photos and writeup of modeling projects on my Minneapolis & Northland Railroad Company.   If you would like to take a look please do at the following:

Attachments:



Re: Painting handles used to be Two Questions About Paint Primers

Jim Betz
 


  Thanks Rob - yours is an elegant solution ... works exceptionally
well and is straight forward and easy to make.

  I have a similar jig I use for weathering tank cars - that involves 
using wood verticals and horizontals.  The car holders on the
ends are tuna cans filled with foam with the centers of the
foam cut out.  This allows me to rotate the car in the holder
while applying the 'drips' that go down and around the car.
  Mine works quite well - but is no where near as elegant as
yours.
                                                                                  - Jim B.
                                                                                         - Jim


Re: Dental tool or “picks”

Paul Doggett
 

Lester 

That’s an interesting article I have built the Speedwitch NP flat and have another one to build.
I will start looking for dental picks a good idea.

Paul Doggett England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 


On 26 Nov 2018, at 14:59, Lester Breuer <rforailroad@...> wrote:

I use dental tools or “picks” to help build every freight car I do.  And, a dental pick can be made into a removable load tool you see in the attached photo.  The photos and writeup of various types and ways I use them when building a freight car are on my blog I started to share photos and writeup of modeling projects on my Minneapolis & Northland Railroad Company.   If you would like to take a look please do at the following:

Attachments:


Dental tool or “picks”

Lester Breuer
 

I use dental tools or “picks” to help build every freight car I do.  And, a dental pick can be made into a removable load tool you see in the attached photo.  The photos and writeup of various types and ways I use them when building a freight car are on my blog I started to share photos and writeup of modeling projects on my Minneapolis & Northland Railroad Company.   If you would like to take a look please do at the following:


Re: Painting handles used to be Two Questions About Paint Primers

O Fenton Wells
 

Thanks Rob, that helps
Fenton

On Sun, Nov 25, 2018 at 9:12 PM roblmclear <rob.mclear@...> wrote:
Sorry guys the photo's were too large to get posted, here they are resized.

Rob McLear
Aussie



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


SFRD reefer kit builds

Eric Hansmann
 

John Ritchie shares hiskit building tips and techniques for Resin Car Works SFRD reefer kits in the latest RCW blog post. 

http://blog.resincarworks.com/sfrd-reefer-kits-2/



Eric Hansmann
RCW web guy


Re: Decals for SHPX

O Fenton Wells
 

Tichy has JM Huber decals for tank cars that SHPX reporting marks
Fenton

On Mon, Nov 26, 2018 at 12:47 AM Richard Townsend via Groups.Io <richtownsend=netscape.net@groups.io> wrote:
In further answer, Tichy sets 10042, 10049, 10360, and 10361 have SHPX reporting marks.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Richard Townsend via Groups.Io <richtownsend=netscape.net@groups.io>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Sun, Nov 25, 2018 9:00 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Decals for SHPX


Without having that article in front of me, it is hard to answer. Champ HT-71 is (was) for white SHPX lettering. Microscale 87-236 has some black SHPX lettering but it might be too recent. I suggest you look at various tank car decal sets for private shippers and see if they are SHPX leases and have SHPX reporting marks even though they are nominally for (i'm making this up) Townsend Oil Company.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: James SANDIFER <steve.sandifer@...>
To: Steam Freight Car <RealSTMFC@groups.io>
Sent: Sun, Nov 25, 2018 7:34 pm
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Decals for SHPX

I have built and painted the tank car that is similar to the Tichy car detailed by Richard in the Railmodel Journal October 1990. I can’t find SHPX decals. Anyone know where to get some?
 
 
J. Stephen Sandifer
 



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Re: Interesting Boxcar

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Scott,

These were Pullman-built, circa 1952 or so, and were 10' IH, likely the only 50' low-height PS-1s ever built. Many were used for ammunition (as in aircraft bombs) transport from the Navy weapons depot at Hawthorn, Nevada to the loading docks at Port Chicago in California, which explains their 10' door openings. Eventually interchange cars from the various military services were consolidated under the DODX reporting marks. At least one car survives, in the Western Railroad Museum collection in Suisun, California.

Far post-period, but these were the cars which exploded in the SP yard at Roseville, California in 1973 after a hot box fire got out of control. The cars were loaded with iron bombs for use in Vietnam. My parents lived just a few blocks from east yard throat, but the explosions were at the west end near the village of Antelope.
When the UP took over the SP circa 1996 and began modernizing the yard, several live bombs blown clear of the fire were found buried under the tracks.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿

On 11/26/18 12:33 AM, Scott wrote:
Found this photo while searching around the net.

U.S. Navy Boxcar

Don't see many 3ft? auxiliary doors!  Neat looking car.

Scott McDonald


Re: Decals for SHPX

Richard Townsend
 

In further answer, Tichy sets 10042, 10049, 10360, and 10361 have SHPX reporting marks.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Richard Townsend via Groups.Io <richtownsend@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Sun, Nov 25, 2018 9:00 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Decals for SHPX


Without having that article in front of me, it is hard to answer. Champ HT-71 is (was) for white SHPX lettering. Microscale 87-236 has some black SHPX lettering but it might be too recent. I suggest you look at various tank car decal sets for private shippers and see if they are SHPX leases and have SHPX reporting marks even though they are nominally for (i'm making this up) Townsend Oil Company.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: James SANDIFER <steve.sandifer@...>
To: Steam Freight Car <RealSTMFC@groups.io>
Sent: Sun, Nov 25, 2018 7:34 pm
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Decals for SHPX

I have built and painted the tank car that is similar to the Tichy car detailed by Richard in the Railmodel Journal October 1990. I can’t find SHPX decals. Anyone know where to get some?
 
 
J. Stephen Sandifer
 


Interesting Boxcar

Scott
 

Found this photo while searching around the net.

U.S. Navy Boxcar

Don't see many 3ft? auxiliary doors!  Neat looking car.

Scott McDonald


Re: Decals for SHPX

Richard Townsend
 


Without having that article in front of me, it is hard to answer. Champ HT-71 is (was) for white SHPX lettering. Microscale 87-236 has some black SHPX lettering but it might be too recent. I suggest you look at various tank car decal sets for private shippers and see if they are SHPX leases and have SHPX reporting marks even though they are nominally for (i'm making this up) Townsend Oil Company.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: James SANDIFER <steve.sandifer@...>
To: Steam Freight Car <RealSTMFC@groups.io>
Sent: Sun, Nov 25, 2018 7:34 pm
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Decals for SHPX

I have built and painted the tank car that is similar to the Tichy car detailed by Richard in the Railmodel Journal October 1990. I can’t find SHPX decals. Anyone know where to get some?
 
 
J. Stephen Sandifer
 


Decals for SHPX

Steve SANDIFER
 

I have built and painted the tank car that is similar to the Tichy car detailed by Richard in the Railmodel Journal October 1990. I can’t find SHPX decals. Anyone know where to get some?

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 


Re: Reefers for frozen fish.

James McDonald
 

Hello Scott and list,

You didn’t say where your layout was set, which might have some bearing on the cars used, as Garth suggested.

Despite not being able to hold temperatures at 0˚F or below, ice refrigerator cars would have been the dominant type of car used for frozen fish in 1950. Mechanicals were rather rare. The frozen food industry asked for any refrigerator cars they could get with extra thick insulation, because for a long time the issue was largely seen to be a matter of not enough insulation instead of insufficient refrigerant. The available number of such heavily insulated cars never seemed to match the needs of shippers, so it seems that quite a number of frozen foods loads must have gotten shipped in ordinary fan cars, much to the displeasure of the consignees, depending on the product.

“Frozen” was a bit of judgement call in the industry, with a differing bodies recommending different temperatures for different foods and with different amounts of “softening” being acceptable during transit. As Tony noted, it was frozen concentrated orange juice (FCOJ) that began to bring about the change to mechanical refrigerators. To taste right FCOJ had to be kept at temperatures below 0˚F. Other frozen foods were a bit more tolerant to variations in temperature, but FCOJ and fish were among those that were not. Money talks, though, and with a 37,740 percent increase in FCOJ sales between 1945 and 1952, the product and its temperature needs was worthy of attention from carriers, especially when the producers were displeased and were shifting loads to trucks in droves.

FGE ordered 11 mechanical refrigerators in 1948, predominantly because of the growth in FCOJ originating in Florida after 1945. They used these 11 cars to try out 9 different mechanical cooling systems. In the period between 1948 and 1950 FGE ordered 165 mechanical cars. They still were a tiny fraction of the cars “suitable” (according to the frozen food industry) for frozen foods. Sources differ on that number, but in either case the number of mechanicals was less than 1% of cars deemed “suitable” for frozen foods in 1953. By 1953 FGE had 175 mechanicals in service, all but 12 of them dedicated to frozen food shipping.

Things didn’t begin to change all that much until around 1955. Not only had trucks begun to dominate frozen food traffic by this time, but in 1955 the railroad industry began for the first time to publicly acknowledge the insufficiency of ice and salt for frozen food shipment. By the end of 1955 a reported 2,100 mechanical refrigerators had been brought into service nationwide.

In terms of frozen fish movements, the industry tends to lump them in under a general category of “seafood” and in 1950 the ICC didn’t appear to treat frozen fish any different than fresh in its stats, so it’s a little hard to extract an exact number of frozen fish movements. ICC records for 1950 show that a total of 8,763 carloads of "Seafood NOS" (fresh and frozen) were originated and terminated, or 190,303 tons. In 1950 there were 66,500 tons of frozen seafood “produced” by the frozen food industry, of which about 30% moved by truck in 1950, leaving 46,500 tons of frozen seafood for railroads and other modes—not really a huge amount when divided by 365 and split into carloads.

There’s been mention a couple of times in this thread about fish sticks. These were introduced in 1953 by General Foods/Birds Eye; something invented to deal with the fact that mechanized trawler ships were netting fish and freezing them at sea into giant blocks. As fish doesn’t thaw and refreeze well, the processors cut these fish blocks into “portions” and “sticks,” breaded them, and then sought to create a market for them, primarily through institutional sales (schools, etc.). Although packaging was a changing subject itself, fish in the late 1940s and early 1950s was more often sold in fiberboard boxes and was often pre-filleted so as to avoid any air pockets inside the cut of fish that might introduce bacteria. Trays, as we now tend to associate with frozen meals, were around by 1950, but didn’t really begin to achieve their icon position in American dining until the mid-1950s.

I would recommend seeing if your local library has (or can get you) back issues of a frozen food trade periodical called “Quick Frozen Foods” from your year of interest. Not only will it give you a good breakdown of what was on the minds of that industry at the time, the issues often contain useful statistics and news items. The editors of that time were hyper-aware of the insufficiency of their transportation solutions so there frequent articles about railroad developments. Don’t overlook the ads as well, since these also give great insights into the industry that are useful for modeling.

All the best,

James McDonald
Greenbelt, MD.


Re: Painting handles used to be Two Questions About Paint Primers

roblmclear
 

Sorry guys the photo's were too large to get posted, here they are resized.

Rob McLear
Aussie


Re: Painting handles used to be Two Questions About Paint Primers

roblmclear
 

Here is another approach, I have used these a lot and it is a sturdy platform.   The uprights are soldered to the square bottom pieces and one end of the tube is soldered to one of the square support bases as well,  the other end is left free so that cars of differing lengths can use the jig.   I have painted 36', 40' ,50' freight cars and full length passenger cars on one of these.   Didn't take that long to make and was not that expensive for the materials, they only thing I changed when I made the second one was to use a harder bearing silver solder, had trouble with the first one until I went back and did that to it as well.

Regards to all
Rob McLear
Aussie


Re: Reefers for frozen fish. (Government Document)

Peter Ness
 

Hi Bob,

 

Many thanks for the link. For my period, this is very useful information.  Note that by changing the three-digit leaflet number I was also able to access the other leaflets in the series.

 

Peter Ness

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro
Sent: Sunday, November 25, 2018 2:19 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Reefers for frozen fish. (Government Document)

 

I found the original link: https://spo.nmfs.noaa.gov/sites/default/files/legacy-pdfs/leaflet431.pdf

Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: Two Questions About Paint Primers

Randy Hammill
 

Wow, I literally just saw almost those exact holders at my buddy Pete’s earlier this week. He said they were from an article back in the day. He has slots he cut in the horizontal pieces with wingnuts to adjust them instead of the pipe. He has pieces of 2”x4” that he cut slots in with a table saw with a circle cut out with a hole saw in the middle to widen it for the wing it so he can stand them up. 

Randy
--

Randy Hammill
Modeling the New Haven Railroad 1946-1954  | https//:blog.newbritainstation.com

23101 - 23120 of 183254