Date   

Re: Prototype Rails Dining Recommendations updates?

Bill Welch
 

Reminder EVERYBODY I did ask you to send these massages to me at MY EMAIL Account, NOT HERE

fgexbill(at)tampabay.rr.com

Bill Welch


Re: Prototype Rails Dining Recommendations updates?

m repka
 

We were very impressed with this place last year on Thusday night! Its up on North Atlantic towards the cruise port, in the shopping center with the other Publix, and think that up there is called Satellite Beach Flavors of India | Indian restaurant in Cocoa Beach | South Indian foodMike R. 




Virus-free. www.avg.com


Re: Modeling a B&O M-26D boxcar

O Fenton Wells
 

Excellent Bill, truly excellent 
Fenton Wells


On Dec 13, 2018, at 3:29 PM, Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:

As we know the Pennsy built thousands of their X29 design and with few exceptions like the late cars with Dreadnaught ends they are identical. Personally I find building two or more identical models to be boring. With the X29 different doors and styles and locations for the doorstops can create some variety. For variety however one can look to the Baltimore & Ohio’s M-26 class of cars that offers six different versions that were also built in the thousands although not in the numbers of the X29. Granted the differences are not dramatic but still I can count five different door type, horizontal and vertical brake arrangements, Duryea and two other underframe arrangements, and different truck type create enough variety to keep my attention.

The model here will be B&O #274971 built in October 1929 utilizing the Red Caboose RC-7003 (molds now owned by InterMountain). Photo #1 captures the right side of the car while #2 is a close-up of the various door area details that distinguish this particular car. Tichy’s “Boxcar Door Hardware” set #3070 provides the “claws” used as door guides/supports—two sets are needed. In this arrangement the doors had a small rib along the bottom of the door and I used .010 x .020 styrene to create this. Archer rivets will be added later. Flattened .010-wire is used for the handles on the doors after the molded on pieces were carefully removed. Tichy .020 rivets are used for the attachment bolts. Note that the upper door track has been carefully shortened. The doorstops are from the Red Caboose kit. Note that the molded-on paired bolt/rivet heads under the door have been peeled off and relocated to match the cross bearers for the Duryea underframe.

A-Line Type “A” sill step parts (Photo #3) were annealed in a flame and then had the two corners squared up while strips of 0.005-styrene were used to make the mounting tabs. A fillet of CA fills in the gap between the metal step and the styrene. Once that is cured liquid Testers is applied to help melt the styrene. The next day the excess was carved away and sanded to give the impression that the styrene and metal are one part. Harvested Athearn boxcar rivets finish the effect. With the Kadee Bracket Grabs firmly in place a new Single Edge Razor Blade will be used to carefully remove the flash.

At some point Red Caboose (Photo #4) cut the tooling for the B&O’s signature seven-rung side ladders/six-rung end ladders. The B&O used lengths of steel bar to attach their ladders and I have glued this in place along with attaching bolts. I have also replaced the molded on rungs with Plastruct’s 0.0010-styrene rod except for the very bottom rung of the side ladders. After the ladders are glued onto the model this rung will be clipped off and a Drop Grab Iron inserted into the holes already drilled into the Ladder Stiles.

The “B” end of this M-26D has some interesting details I think. I scratch built the signature “Tatum” brake step with bits of dimensional styrene. I think the way the Retainer’s pipe cuts sharply to the right on the end is interesting: To make this I use .010-wire which a little oversize but much easier to handle. Flattened .010-wire is used to make the two pipe brackets (Photos #5,6). The B&O used what I call Type 2 Bracket Grabs on the bottom of the ends. They are characterized by having the brackets rotated 90°. The parts seen in Photo #7 are the kit parts converted to brass (by Valley Brass). I did a lousy job with the Drill template for the Bracket grab. I am going to try to pry it off, fill the holes and re-drill for a straighter install. The Brake Gear will eventually have a Kadee Ajax wheel attached. Photo #7 shows the ladder installed on the “A” end and how it looks with the steel bars and bolts used to secure it. That bracket grab demonstrates I can get them straight sometimes.

Speedwitch makes a lovely kit for the M-26 Duryea underframe and Photos #9–12 show my interpretation of how to build it. I used the 0.010-styrene rod for the pipe from the AB Valve to the brake cylinder here because it is so flexible and it made the bends much easier. I run hot and cold regarding the Train Line and did not install it this model because I did not think it would be visible so the pipe from the Dirt Collector simply terminates to nowhereville.

Photo #13 shows the scratch built “Tatum Patent” Route Car Holders that will eventually be attached to the side of the car to the left of the doors. These were basically a steel frame into which the tack board would slide.

Thanks to a friend I know that the Running Boards were for the M-26D class were 42-feet 10-inches long and I plan to build a wood running board system using my favored Mt. Albert strip wood for this model. The M-26D class rode on Andrews trucks.

Hopefully I will follow soon with my Wheeling Lake Erie and Nickel Plate builds.
Bill Welch

<_1 B_O M_27D side view.JPG>
<_2 B_O M_27D door area details.JPG>
<_11 B_O M_26D w_Speedwitch Duryea U_F.JPG>
<_12 B_O M_26D w_Speedwitch Duryea U_F.JPG>
<_13 Tatum Patent B_O Route Card Holders.JPG>
<_3 B_O M_27D left end sill step, Type ! braket grabs, bolster flange.JPG>
<_4 B_O M_27D _left_ side ladders, _right_ end ladder with attachement brackets.JPG>
<_5 B_O M_27D _B_ end Tatum brake step straight on.JPG>
<_6 B_O M_27D _B_ end Tatum brake step oblique view.JPG>
<_7 B_O M_27D Type 2 braket grabs.JPG>
<_8 B_O M_27D _A_ end with ladder inplace attachment plates.JPG>
<_9 B_O M_26D w_Speedwitch Duryea U_F.JPG>
<_10 B_O M_26D w_Speedwitch Duryea U_F.JPG>


Prototype Rails2019 Clinic Schedeule and Descriptions

Mikebrock
 

Guys,

For those who might be tired of shoveling snow and enduring freezing temps, here’s the latest flyer of PrototypeRails with both the clinic schedule and clinic descriptions:

 

www.prototyperails.com

 

Several people have enquired about the clinic schedule and clinic descriptions. Links to both are located toward the bottom of the flyer.

 

Mike Brock

 


Re: Modeling a B&O M-26D boxcar

gtws00
 

That's some amazing work Bill.
Thanks for sharing
George Toman


Modeling a B&O M-26D boxcar

Bill Welch
 

As we know the Pennsy built thousands of their X29 design and with few exceptions like the late cars with Dreadnaught ends they are identical. Personally I find building two or more identical models to be boring. With the X29 different doors and styles and locations for the doorstops can create some variety. For variety however one can look to the Baltimore & Ohio’s M-26 class of cars that offers six different versions that were also built in the thousands although not in the numbers of the X29. Granted the differences are not dramatic but still I can count five different door type, horizontal and vertical brake arrangements, Duryea and two other underframe arrangements, and different truck type create enough variety to keep my attention.

The model here will be B&O #274971 built in October 1929 utilizing the Red Caboose RC-7003 (molds now owned by InterMountain). Photo #1 captures the right side of the car while #2 is a close-up of the various door area details that distinguish this particular car. Tichy’s “Boxcar Door Hardware” set #3070 provides the “claws” used as door guides/supports—two sets are needed. In this arrangement the doors had a small rib along the bottom of the door and I used .010 x .020 styrene to create this. Archer rivets will be added later. Flattened .010-wire is used for the handles on the doors after the molded on pieces were carefully removed. Tichy .020 rivets are used for the attachment bolts. Note that the upper door track has been carefully shortened. The doorstops are from the Red Caboose kit. Note that the molded-on paired bolt/rivet heads under the door have been peeled off and relocated to match the cross bearers for the Duryea underframe.

A-Line Type “A” sill step parts (Photo #3) were annealed in a flame and then had the two corners squared up while strips of 0.005-styrene were used to make the mounting tabs. A fillet of CA fills in the gap between the metal step and the styrene. Once that is cured liquid Testers is applied to help melt the styrene. The next day the excess was carved away and sanded to give the impression that the styrene and metal are one part. Harvested Athearn boxcar rivets finish the effect. With the Kadee Bracket Grabs firmly in place a new Single Edge Razor Blade will be used to carefully remove the flash.

At some point Red Caboose (Photo #4) cut the tooling for the B&O’s signature seven-rung side ladders/six-rung end ladders. The B&O used lengths of steel bar to attach their ladders and I have glued this in place along with attaching bolts. I have also replaced the molded on rungs with Plastruct’s 0.0010-styrene rod except for the very bottom rung of the side ladders. After the ladders are glued onto the model this rung will be clipped off and a Drop Grab Iron inserted into the holes already drilled into the Ladder Stiles.

The “B” end of this M-26D has some interesting details I think. I scratch built the signature “Tatum” brake step with bits of dimensional styrene. I think the way the Retainer’s pipe cuts sharply to the right on the end is interesting: To make this I use .010-wire which a little oversize but much easier to handle. Flattened .010-wire is used to make the two pipe brackets (Photos #5,6). The B&O used what I call Type 2 Bracket Grabs on the bottom of the ends. They are characterized by having the brackets rotated 90°. The parts seen in Photo #7 are the kit parts converted to brass (by Valley Brass). I did a lousy job with the Drill template for the Bracket grab. I am going to try to pry it off, fill the holes and re-drill for a straighter install. The Brake Gear will eventually have a Kadee Ajax wheel attached. Photo #7 shows the ladder installed on the “A” end and how it looks with the steel bars and bolts used to secure it. That bracket grab demonstrates I can get them straight sometimes.

Speedwitch makes a lovely kit for the M-26 Duryea underframe and Photos #9–12 show my interpretation of how to build it. I used the 0.010-styrene rod for the pipe from the AB Valve to the brake cylinder here because it is so flexible and it made the bends much easier. I run hot and cold regarding the Train Line and did not install it this model because I did not think it would be visible so the pipe from the Dirt Collector simply terminates to nowhereville.

Photo #13 shows the scratch built “Tatum Patent” Route Car Holders that will eventually be attached to the side of the car to the left of the doors. These were basically a steel frame into which the tack board would slide.

Thanks to a friend I know that the Running Boards were for the M-26D class were 42-feet 10-inches long and I plan to build a wood running board system using my favored Mt. Albert strip wood for this model. The M-26D class rode on Andrews trucks.

Hopefully I will follow soon with my Wheeling Lake Erie and Nickel Plate builds.
Bill Welch


Re: 1934 AAR twin hopper blueprints

mark_landgraf
 

Ed

There are a variety of AAR hopper drawing reprints in the Sept 1987 Mainline Modeler, including the one that you are looking for.

The drawing that appears in the Car Cycs appears to be the AAR drawing. I have a couple of drawings from the rr's and they are tracings of the same AAR drawing, overall sheet layout, detail placement and dimension location.

I have not found any other detail drawings. One would expect to find them in an AAR Freight Car Construction manual for that period.

My collection jumps from 1925 to 1960. I'd like to close that gap a little if some one has one to borrow for scanning purposes. I have a large scanner that can handle the foldouts.

Mark Landgraf
Albany NY


--------------------------------------------

On Mon, 12/10/18, Ed Hawkins <hawk0621@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] 1934 AAR twin hopper blueprints
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Date: Monday, December 10, 2018, 9:56 AM


On Dec 10, 2018, at 7:58 AM, up4479
<up4479@hotmail.com>
wrote:
A friend is in need of access to drawings for a
1934 AAR twin hopper.  This is for a fully detailed large
1:8 scale model.   Does anybody have a lead on any
original drawings?  Thanks in advance.

Steve,A general drawing of the
car was published on p. 263 of the 1937 Car Builders’
Cyclopedia. This drawing shows a vertical-staff hand brake
that few, if any, cars actually received. For developing a
scale a model it provides the basics. It’s the version
having straight side sills between the bolsters and an
upward bend towards the corners.
The National Museum of
Transportation has ACF drawings for the cars they built, and
the Illinois Railway Museum has drawings for cars built by
Pullman-Standard in the 1930s to early 1940s. Both of these
sources have not only general arrangement drawings for
specific series of cars, but they also have other drawings
such as brake arrangement, side & end construction,
floor sheets, and various steel details drawings for the
underframe & other components. 
Please advise if you have a specific
railroad in mind & I can provide specific lists of ACF
drawings. Paper or digital copies of the ACF drawings are
available. 
Regards,Ed
Hawkins


Re: Photos From The New York Historical Society's Digital Collections

Ralph W. Brown
 

Hi Ben,
 
Thanks for the confirmation.
 
Pax,
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 

From: Benjamin Hom
Sent: Wednesday, December 12, 2018 10:44 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photos From The New York Historical Society's Digital Collections
 
Ralph Brown wrote:
"A number of 14” 50 caliber railway guns were built for the Navy by Baldwin Locomotive Works late in the war, one of which was used after the war for testing 14” ammunition, which still used by battleships.  At some point, that gun was moved to the Washington Navy Yard for museum display, but I’ve been unable to determine whether it is still there.  See:
https://www.history.navy.mil/content/history/museums/nmusn/explore/photography/wwi/wwi-naval-railway-guns/us-naval-railway-guns-assembly.html .

It is indeed still on display in the park in front of the Navy Museum, though in need of some corrosion control and a fresh coat of paint.
 
 
Ben Hom



Re: Photos From The New York Historical Society's Digital Collections

Benjamin Hom
 

Ralph Brown wrote:
"A number of 14” 50 caliber railway guns were built for the Navy by Baldwin Locomotive Works late in the war, one of which was used after the war for testing 14” ammunition, which still used by battleships.  At some point, that gun was moved to the Washington Navy Yard for museum display, but I’ve been unable to determine whether it is still there.  See:
https://www.history.navy.mil/content/history/museums/nmusn/explore/photography/wwi/wwi-naval-railway-guns/us-naval-railway-guns-assembly.html .

It is indeed still on display in the park in front of the Navy Museum, though in need of some corrosion control and a fresh coat of paint.


Ben Hom



Re: Photos From The New York Historical Society's Digital Collections

Bruce Smith
 

​Ralph,


I too wondered as to whether this was one of the WWI USN railway guns. I'm pretty sure it is, but there just isn't quite enough visible to be sure.


Regards

Bruce

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL 


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Ralph W. Brown <rbrown51@...>
Sent: Wednesday, December 12, 2018 9:20 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photos From The New York Historical Society's Digital Collections
 
Hi Bob, et al.,
 
Regarding the third photograph listed (http://digitalcollections.nyhistory.org/islandora/object/islandora%3A72295), the New York Historical Society Museum & Library caption identifies the subject as “Unidentified civilians examining a large artillery piece mounted on a train car, Baltimore, Maryland, undated (ca. 1919),” but this appears to be a railway gun rather than an artillery piece mount on a train.  Judging from the end sill, coupler and under carriage, I suspect it is a US built gun built for WWI.  A number of 14” 50 caliber railway guns were built for the Navy by Baldwin Locomotive Works late in the war, one of which was used after the war for testing 14” ammunition, which still used by battleships.  At some point, that gun was moved to the Washington Navy Yard for museum display, but I’ve been unable to determine whether it is still there.  See: https://www.history.navy.mil/content/history/museums/nmusn/explore/photography/wwi/wwi-naval-railway-guns/us-naval-railway-guns-assembly.html.
 
In any event, I’m wonder whether the railway gun in that photograph is that particular 14”50 less the enclosure I’ve seen in other photographs, such one shown on the Museum’s website here: https://www.history.navy.mil/content/history/museums/nmusn/explore/photography/wwi/wwi-naval-railway-guns.html.  The 1919 time frame would be about right.  Anyone else here any thoughts on the identity of this unusual piece of “rolling stock”?
 
Pax, 
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 
From: Bob Chaparro
Sent: Tuesday, December 11, 2018 1:10 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photos From The New York Historical Society's Digital Collections
 

Most model railroads are never completed. Mine suffers from the owner's habit of pursuing digital archives. In this case, I was looking for (and found) Sunkist billboards for my Citrus Modeling Group and went from Getty Images to the actual source, the New York Historical Society's digital collections

( http://digitalcollections.nyhistory.org/ ).

Once there, I wondered what railroad items were in the collection. They have literally hundreds of photos of elevated train infrastructure being removed in early 1941 under a search for "Railroad". Queries for "Train" and "Pier" (as in d"own by the docks") were more fruitful.

Below is what I found.

I hope you enjoy these and can make use of the photos. These can be enlarged quite a bit while retaining good detail.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

++++

SP Boxcar 83468 & PRR Ventilated Boxcar 73922

http://digitalcollections.nyhistory.org/islandora/object/islandora%3A68733

PRR Boxcar 7?746 "Empire Line"

http://digitalcollections.nyhistory.org/islandora/object/islandora%3A72870

Railway Gun & Camouflage (?) Painted Boxcars

http://digitalcollections.nyhistory.org/islandora/object/islandora%3A72295

Four MTD Reefers

http://digitalcollections.nyhistory.org/islandora/object/islandora%3A64065

Assorted Boxcar Rooftops

http://digitalcollections.nyhistory.org/islandora/object/islandora%3A65688

B&M Boxcar 70027CT Plus Gondola

http://digitalcollections.nyhistory.org/islandora/object/islandora%3A65652

Partial UP 122156 Boxcar

http://digitalcollections.nyhistory.org/islandora/object/islandora%3A67344

Assorted Boxcars

http://digitalcollections.nyhistory.org/islandora/object/islandora%3A67414

NYC Boxcar 198604 Plus Other Boxcars

http://digitalcollections.nyhistory.org/islandora/object/islandora%3A68116

IC Boxcar 28000 (Partial) & VRR Boxcar 8610

http://digitalcollections.nyhistory.org/islandora/object/islandora%3A68334

Many Boxcars On Car Floats

http://digitalcollections.nyhistory.org/islandora/object/islandora%3A68115

SOU Gondola 180010 & NYC&HR Reefer 131147

http://digitalcollections.nyhistory.org/islandora/object/islandora%3A68324

New Haven Boxcar

http://digitalcollections.nyhistory.org/islandora/object/islandora%3A68339

Partial Great Northern Boxcar (Hopper Box?)

http://digitalcollections.nyhistory.org/islandora/object/islandora%3A68532


Re: Photos From The New York Historical Society's Digital Collections

Ralph W. Brown
 

Hi Bob, et al.,
 
Regarding the third photograph listed (http://digitalcollections.nyhistory.org/islandora/object/islandora%3A72295), the New York Historical Society Museum & Library caption identifies the subject as “Unidentified civilians examining a large artillery piece mounted on a train car, Baltimore, Maryland, undated (ca. 1919),” but this appears to be a railway gun rather than an artillery piece mount on a train.  Judging from the end sill, coupler and under carriage, I suspect it is a US built gun built for WWI.  A number of 14” 50 caliber railway guns were built for the Navy by Baldwin Locomotive Works late in the war, one of which was used after the war for testing 14” ammunition, which still used by battleships.  At some point, that gun was moved to the Washington Navy Yard for museum display, but I’ve been unable to determine whether it is still there.  See: https://www.history.navy.mil/content/history/museums/nmusn/explore/photography/wwi/wwi-naval-railway-guns/us-naval-railway-guns-assembly.html.
 
In any event, I’m wonder whether the railway gun in that photograph is that particular 14”50 less the enclosure I’ve seen in other photographs, such one shown on the Museum’s website here: https://www.history.navy.mil/content/history/museums/nmusn/explore/photography/wwi/wwi-naval-railway-guns.html.  The 1919 time frame would be about right.  Anyone else here any thoughts on the identity of this unusual piece of “rolling stock”?
 
Pax, 
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 

From: Bob Chaparro
Sent: Tuesday, December 11, 2018 1:10 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photos From The New York Historical Society's Digital Collections
 

Most model railroads are never completed. Mine suffers from the owner's habit of pursuing digital archives. In this case, I was looking for (and found) Sunkist billboards for my Citrus Modeling Group and went from Getty Images to the actual source, the New York Historical Society's digital collections

( http://digitalcollections.nyhistory.org/ ).

Once there, I wondered what railroad items were in the collection. They have literally hundreds of photos of elevated train infrastructure being removed in early 1941 under a search for "Railroad". Queries for "Train" and "Pier" (as in d"own by the docks") were more fruitful.

Below is what I found.

I hope you enjoy these and can make use of the photos. These can be enlarged quite a bit while retaining good detail.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

++++

SP Boxcar 83468 & PRR Ventilated Boxcar 73922

http://digitalcollections.nyhistory.org/islandora/object/islandora%3A68733

PRR Boxcar 7?746 "Empire Line"

http://digitalcollections.nyhistory.org/islandora/object/islandora%3A72870

Railway Gun & Camouflage (?) Painted Boxcars

http://digitalcollections.nyhistory.org/islandora/object/islandora%3A72295

Four MTD Reefers

http://digitalcollections.nyhistory.org/islandora/object/islandora%3A64065

Assorted Boxcar Rooftops

http://digitalcollections.nyhistory.org/islandora/object/islandora%3A65688

B&M Boxcar 70027CT Plus Gondola

http://digitalcollections.nyhistory.org/islandora/object/islandora%3A65652

Partial UP 122156 Boxcar

http://digitalcollections.nyhistory.org/islandora/object/islandora%3A67344

Assorted Boxcars

http://digitalcollections.nyhistory.org/islandora/object/islandora%3A67414

NYC Boxcar 198604 Plus Other Boxcars

http://digitalcollections.nyhistory.org/islandora/object/islandora%3A68116

IC Boxcar 28000 (Partial) & VRR Boxcar 8610

http://digitalcollections.nyhistory.org/islandora/object/islandora%3A68334

Many Boxcars On Car Floats

http://digitalcollections.nyhistory.org/islandora/object/islandora%3A68115

SOU Gondola 180010 & NYC&HR Reefer 131147

http://digitalcollections.nyhistory.org/islandora/object/islandora%3A68324

New Haven Boxcar

http://digitalcollections.nyhistory.org/islandora/object/islandora%3A68339

Partial Great Northern Boxcar (Hopper Box?)

http://digitalcollections.nyhistory.org/islandora/object/islandora%3A68532


Re: PRR G24 scrap car questions

Bruce Smith
 

From the PRRT&HS Gondola book - The arrangement drawing was changed to specify an extra 3 side stakes and to include the racks for scrap tin service in 1949. As of October 31, 1954, the PRR had 23 cars shown as equipped for scrap tin, but only 5 were G24s. These cars were gone by October 31, 1959.


It is highly likely that the scrap tin cars had the additional side stakes and  the brass car referred to by Johannes does have those stakes.


Regards

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of James E Kubanick <jekuban@...>
Sent: Wednesday, December 12, 2018 5:56 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] PRR G24 scrap car questions
 
I am surprised to see that the OER tracing shows only six of these cars remaining in 1958. I worked at the HJ Heinz plant in Pittsburgh in 1957-58 and these cars would show up on one of our B&O sidings to be loaded with spent tin plate sheets that had been run trough our stamping machines to form glassware closures (bottle and jar lids). This must have been one of their final assignments,

Jim Kubanick
Morgantown WV

On Wednesday, December 12, 2018, 4:47:14 PM EST, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:



you have a keen eye for the obvious


On 12/12/2018 2:59 PM, Bruce Smith wrote:
Tim,

While the car was BUILT in 1919, the presence of a NEW stencil from 1919 (being the weight stencil and not the built stencil, which would have been towards the right end of the car side) is clearly incorrect as the car would have been reweighed repeatedly before receiving steel sides and likely after receiving steel sides and before getting the side extensions.  Technically, the model depicted in the photo does not have ANY “BUILT” stencil.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."




On Dec 12, 2018, at 1:34 PM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Johannes

The build date is correct, but most had been rebuilt by 1953 with steel sheathing replacing the wood. You should try to buy the 1953 ORER reprint from the NMRA! The PRR listings actually show the car classes!!


On 12/12/2018 5:58 AM, vapeurchapelon wrote:
Hello friends,

I consider buying this PRR G24 scrap gondola:

https://www.ebay.de/itm/Precision-Scale-Company-16014-1-HO-BRASS-PRR-G-24-Gondola-Painted-EX-Box/332941133908?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2060353.m1431.l2649

But of course I have some questions.
1. How many of these cars were in existence?
2. What's the appropriate time frame? Model has AB brakes, but a NEW date 1919 which obviously is very wrong.
3. Were these cars used in interchange service, or were they restricted to PRR homerails, or even to some specific regions/ companies?

Many thanks and best regards

Johannes
Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1953



--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*






--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: T&P RC box

william darnaby
 

Ed Hawkins was selling these cars at a very early Naperville meet and that is where I got mine (car #40876).  They were offered by the T&P Historical Society IIRC.  Anyway, I made the door by cutting and splicing the Detail Associates Superior door which is now useful for nothing else (too short) as it was made for the Athearn blue box car.  It also got me all of the neat hardware.

 

Bill Darnaby

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Benjamin Hom
Sent: Wednesday, December 12, 2018 5:17 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] T&P RC box

 

Tony Pawley wrote:

"Easiest way to the 5-panel door is to either make one or take the 8-panel one and scrape the ribs off then relay news one I guess?"

 

Not sure what "8-panel" door you're referring to...just scratchbuild the 5-panel door.  It's not that difficult - just some work with sheet and strip styrene, some Archer rivets, and door hardware scrounged from another source.

 

 

Ben Hom

 

 

 


Re: T&P RC box

Benjamin Hom
 

Steve Hile wrote:
"How about using Dan Hall's Southwest Scale 5 panel door?  No photo on the site, but
Superior 6 Ft Wide 10' 6" IH 5 Panel Door 

Too tall.  The T&P cars are 10 ft IH.  Otherwise, you'd be also able to use a Kadee or Branchline door.


Ben Hom


Re: PRR G24 scrap car questions

James E Kubanick
 

I am surprised to see that the OER tracing shows only six of these cars remaining in 1958. I worked at the HJ Heinz plant in Pittsburgh in 1957-58 and these cars would show up on one of our B&O sidings to be loaded with spent tin plate sheets that had been run trough our stamping machines to form glassware closures (bottle and jar lids). This must have been one of their final assignments,

Jim Kubanick
Morgantown WV

On Wednesday, December 12, 2018, 4:47:14 PM EST, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:



you have a keen eye for the obvious


On 12/12/2018 2:59 PM, Bruce Smith wrote:
Tim,

While the car was BUILT in 1919, the presence of a NEW stencil from 1919 (being the weight stencil and not the built stencil, which would have been towards the right end of the car side) is clearly incorrect as the car would have been reweighed repeatedly before receiving steel sides and likely after receiving steel sides and before getting the side extensions.  Technically, the model depicted in the photo does not have ANY “BUILT” stencil.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."




On Dec 12, 2018, at 1:34 PM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Johannes

The build date is correct, but most had been rebuilt by 1953 with steel sheathing replacing the wood. You should try to buy the 1953 ORER reprint from the NMRA! The PRR listings actually show the car classes!!


On 12/12/2018 5:58 AM, vapeurchapelon wrote:
Hello friends,

I consider buying this PRR G24 scrap gondola:

https://www.ebay.de/itm/Precision-Scale-Company-16014-1-HO-BRASS-PRR-G-24-Gondola-Painted-EX-Box/332941133908?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2060353.m1431.l2649

But of course I have some questions.
1. How many of these cars were in existence?
2. What's the appropriate time frame? Model has AB brakes, but a NEW date 1919 which obviously is very wrong.
3. Were these cars used in interchange service, or were they restricted to PRR homerails, or even to some specific regions/ companies?

Many thanks and best regards

Johannes
Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1953



--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*






--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: T&P RC box

Steve and Barb Hile
 

How about using Dan Hall's Southwest Scale 5 panel door?  No photo on the site, but
 
 
I was a little leery of Protocraft calling them Creco doors.
 
Steve Hile



From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Benjamin Hom
Sent: Wednesday, December 12, 2018 5:17 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] T&P RC box

Tony Pawley wrote:
"Easiest way to the 5-panel door is to either make one or take the 8-panel one and scrape the ribs off then relay news one I guess?"

Not sure what "8-panel" door you're referring to...just scratchbuild the 5-panel door.  It's not that difficult - just some work with sheet and strip styrene, some Archer rivets, and door hardware scrounged from another source.


Ben Hom




Re: T&P RC box

Benjamin Hom
 

Tony Pawley wrote:
"Easiest way to the 5-panel door is to either make one or take the 8-panel one and scrape the ribs off then relay news one I guess?"

Not sure what "8-panel" door you're referring to...just scratchbuild the 5-panel door.  It's not that difficult - just some work with sheet and strip styrene, some Archer rivets, and door hardware scrounged from another source.


Ben Hom




Re: PRR G24 scrap car questions

Tim O'Connor
 


you have a keen eye for the obvious


On 12/12/2018 2:59 PM, Bruce Smith wrote:
Tim,

While the car was BUILT in 1919, the presence of a NEW stencil from 1919 (being the weight stencil and not the built stencil, which would have been towards the right end of the car side) is clearly incorrect as the car would have been reweighed repeatedly before receiving steel sides and likely after receiving steel sides and before getting the side extensions.  Technically, the model depicted in the photo does not have ANY “BUILT” stencil.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."




On Dec 12, 2018, at 1:34 PM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Johannes

The build date is correct, but most had been rebuilt by 1953 with steel sheathing replacing the wood. You should try to buy the 1953 ORER reprint from the NMRA! The PRR listings actually show the car classes!!


On 12/12/2018 5:58 AM, vapeurchapelon wrote:
Hello friends,

I consider buying this PRR G24 scrap gondola:

https://www.ebay.de/itm/Precision-Scale-Company-16014-1-HO-BRASS-PRR-G-24-Gondola-Painted-EX-Box/332941133908?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2060353.m1431.l2649

But of course I have some questions.
1. How many of these cars were in existence?
2. What's the appropriate time frame? Model has AB brakes, but a NEW date 1919 which obviously is very wrong.
3. Were these cars used in interchange service, or were they restricted to PRR homerails, or even to some specific regions/ companies?

Many thanks and best regards

Johannes
Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1953



--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*






--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: GN Reefer Ablaze

Walter
 

They also will burn if the fans were not turnoff. Heaters not fastened properly will also do the same. Don’t ask how I know.

Walter Ohrnell


Photos From The AC&Y Historical Society

David
 

NATX 3180 Acid Tank Car

Page 21

https://acyhs.org/newsletter/ACYHS_News_Fall_Winter_2015.pdf

Three-course 7(?)k radial Standard Tank Car product, rebuilt for acid service at some point. The dome platform may have been added at that time.

AC&Y 1411 Flat Car With Conveyor Belt Load

Page 6

https://acyhs.org/newsletter/ACYHS_NEWS_SS_2016.pdf

Page 15 shows one of the ex-Piedmont & Northern single-sheathed 1-1/2 door boxes.

David Thompson

22741 - 22760 of 183396