Date   

Re: Staley Tank Car question and modeling advice

brianleppert@att.net
 

In our Files section are the pages of an AC&F brochure for their Type 8 tank car.  Listing for pages start at the bottom of page 7 in Files.

Brian Leppert
Carson City, NV


Re: DODX Tank Car, Another View

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Tim

Thanks for posting the photo. Those PAs are nice too.

Coming back to my second photo, the end of one of what appears to be a General American car is to the left of the AC&F car. Note the two-level corner steps and the lack of a short sill above the trucks.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff


Re: deliver something other than livestock

Louie B. Hydrick
 

Greetings,

In compiling loading records on the Georgia Railroad, I have found replacement car wheels, axles, and coupler castings delivered to the Georgia's car shops in cattle cars, and shipments out of local industry of industrial pump castings, sewer lids, brick, tile, clay pipe, and cotton (cotton, either very early on, or after diesels).

Connecting roads (Southern, Charleston & Western Carolina, Georgia & Florida,  Central of Georgia) also used cattle cars at least once for produce baskets and crates, watermelons, pumpkins, and unnoted produce in baskets.

Louie B. Hydrick
Associate Broker
RE/MAX Partners
4316 Washington Road
Evans GA 30809-3957

706-832-6263 Mobile
706-922-7355 Office
706-922-7356 Fax
706-922-7368 Direct

GA License: 207874 SC License: 14865

Or visit me on the web at:
www.csrahomesandland.com
or
www.louiebhydrick.remax-georgia.com


Re: deliver something other than livestock

Steve SANDIFER
 

Santa Fe did the same, lining the cars with cardboard or plywood. In later years, some were lined with plywood and repainted so that the car was totally mineral brown and a “G” added to the car number. You could build a resin kit this way and not fool will sanding the flashing away.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Andy Carlson
Sent: Monday, January 21, 2019 11:32 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] deliver something other than livestock

 

Clark, such as this Q car?

-Andy Carlson

Ojai CA

 

On Monday, January 21, 2019, 9:19:17 AM PST, Clark Propst <cepropst@q.com> wrote:

 

 

They would line the cars with plywood and haul grain in them. Have photos.
Clark Propst


World War II Era Gondolas from Tangent Scale Models!

Tangent Scale Models
 

Tangent Scale Models is pleased to announce the availability today of our latest run of Bethlehem 52’6” 70-Ton Gondolas in HO scale.  Produced from 1937 until 1957, Bethlehem Steel Company produced over 6,000 of these Gondolas at its Johnstown PA plant and supplied parts to other builders to build an additional 3,000+ cars.  These gondolas saw service across the steam, steam-transition, and diesel-eras.  These cars could be loaded with steel products, automotive frames, bulk material and scrap metal, just to name a few, and served customers across the USA and Canada.  The prototypes were built with drop ends and equipped with various options per the buyer’s specifications.

We will have these in stock this weekend at Springfield!

 

The Tangent Scale Models Bethlehem 52’6” 70-Ton Gondola is a distinctive finescale replica that includes highly accurate lettering, “true to life” colors, and “near-scale” draft gear.  The Tangent model features prototype specific options as well as interior detail, wire grab irons, CNC-machined wheels, Kadee® scale couplers and an intelligent weight design to ensure the model operates as good as it looks.

Check them out now at www.tangentscalemodels.com in these FIVE sharp RTR schemes:

 

Baltimore & Ohio (B&O) "Original O-59A 9-1941" is an all new paint scheme for the Tangent Bethlehem 52’6” 70T Gondola.  This group of 300 cars was built by BSC and delivered to the B&O in September of 1941.  While the B&O rostered over 4,000 of these gondolas total, the paint schemes show interesting variations.  By this date, B&O has shifted the Capitol Dome Logo to the right side of the car.  Duryea draft gear, riveted steel floors, corrugated ends, and an Ajax brake wheel are all present on the model and correct for this B&O series.  Check out the slack adjuster, mounted under the 5th rib on one side of the car – accurate for this specific B&O offering!  This car is available in 6 different numbers!

 

Reading (RDG) "Original 1941" replicates the delivery scheme on Reading’s first 100 car order, built by Bethlehem Steel.  BSC and the Reading Company’s own shops would eventually combine to build 2000 cars between 1941 and 1945!  Classic white roman lettering stands out on these black GHH class cars.  Reading specifications included Duryea draft gear, riveted steel floors, corrugated ends, and Ajax brake wheels.  All of these important details are present on the Tangent model and we are pleased to offer 6 new numbers for 2019!

 

Reading (RDG) "GHH Repaint 1956" is one of our most popular and requested paint schemes for this gondola.  1956 has brought a fresh coat of black paint and the Reading’s new “Speed Lettering” graphics to this 1941-built GHH class workhorse.  Slanted and stylized speed lettering with Roman reporting marks and data – this is Classic Reading Company, all the way.  We are very happy to offer 6 numbers in this scheme!

 

Lehigh Valley (LV) "Original 1942" brings some color to this release, exhibiting the Lehigh Valley’s oxide red paint and white lettering.  These cars are part of the LV’s second order of 400 gondolas.  Take your time – enjoy the nuances of accurate LV lettering:  The unevenly spaced LD LMT line, the classic LEHIGH VALLEY typestyle, and black & white diamond.  The Lehigh Valley requested conventional draft gear, wood floor, and Dreadnaught ends for these cars, all duplicated with the Tangent offering.  This scheme is available in 6 numbers!

 

Lehigh Valley (LV) "Green 1970" gives the 1970s modelers a splash of beautiful green color!  This offering replicates a series of cars refurbished by United State Railway Equipment (USRE) in Washington, Indiana for the Lehigh Valley in February of 1970.  This model Is full of little details: a light gray interior wall color matching the prototype, etched-metal Wine tie-downs on the top chord of the car, and stand-off metal ACI plates -- just like the prototype.  This car is available in three numbers!

 

Want to see photos of our new spectacular replicas?

See http://www.tangentscalemodels.com/  for a link to the new models!

 

We studied the prototype to accurately reproduce it with the following features:

- Dimensional accuracy – scaled exactly from Bethlehem Steel plans

- Highly accurate “true to life” colors

- Exact fonts and lettering placement – compare our replicas to the prototype photos on our website!

- Detail variations: Side chord tie downs appropriate for each paint scheme

- Detail variations: Steel or wood decks inside the car

- Detail variations: Duryea or conventional end sill detail appropriate for each paint scheme

- Detail variations: End door variations (Dreadnaught and Straight Corrugated) appropriate for each paint scheme

- Detail variations: Tack board locations appropriate for each paint scheme

- Detail variations: Brake platforms appropriate for each paint scheme

- Detail variations: Handbrakes applied to match production specifications (Universal, Ajax, or Equipco handbrakes available as separate parts, too!)

- Interior deck sits at the scale height

- Interior detail inside the gondola

- Wire grab irons and coupler lift bars

- Separate air hoses

- Weighted to NMRA specs for smooth operation

- Genuine Kadee® scale couplers

- Tangent 70-ton ASF A-3 Ride-Control trucks

- CNC-machined 33” wheels in high quality Tangent Scale Models trucks, with semi-scale wheels available separately

- Recommended age 14 years and older.

 

Do not miss out on this popular Bethlehem 52’-6” 70-Ton Riveted Drop-End Gondola!  Pricing for our new RTR gondolas is $38.95 each with quantity discounts for direct purchases from Tangent Scale Models.

 

Thank you for continuing to support Tangent Scale Models, a family-owned and operated company! 

 

David Lehlbach

Tangent Scale Models

“Unparalleled scale replicas for discriminating railroad modelers”

www.tangentscalemodels.com

tangentscalemodels@...

PO Box 6514

Asheville NC 28816

828-279-6106


Re: UP Side Door Caboose Survivor

Randy Hees
 

The surviving depot in Rhyolite is from the Las Vegas & Tonopah.  The caboose is from the San Pedro, Los Angeles & Salt Lake (later LA&SL. today Union Pacific)  It was built by Pullman in November of 1903,  It was retired in 1928 as no 3303, was previously no 4217.  It was considered a non-common standard (NCS) class car.

The body was moved to Rhyolite to be used as part of a gas station.    

Randy Hees


Re: Staley Tank Car question and modeling advice

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 


Hi Doug and Steve and List Members,
 
Doug's photo shows the car AESX 22 closest to the camera. The Fallen Flags web site has an image of AESX 23 - the next car in the numeric series of reporting marks.
 
In any case, AESX 23 looks to be a dead-on match for AESX 22.
 
 
Hope this helps.
 
Claus Schlund
 
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, January 21, 2019 12:07 PM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Staley Tank Car question and modeling advice

This car is an ACF product, like a Type 7 or 8.  An approach modeling this car could be from an F&C tank car kit, probably the high walkway car, with the running boards lowered.  What isn't clear from the on-line photos is whether the end sill of the kit has the trapezoid shaped end sill.  The hand rail across the tank ends are a notable feature.

Steve Hile

-----Original Message-----
From: Doug Forbes
Sent: Jan 21, 2019 10:04 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Staley Tank Car question and modeling advice

To all,
In looking for photos, I ran across this picture of a Staley tank car from the Decatur Herald and Review website.  I don't know much about tank cars and was wonder what type and any suggestions about how to maybe model such a car. 
Thanks,
Doug
 


California Dispatch Line

Bob Chaparro
 

Just a little history.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

++++

California Dispatch Line was incorporated under the laws of California on April 11, 1914, for the purpose, among others, of owning, maintaining, and operating tank and other cars and machinery, apparatus, and appliances in connection with the shipment and transportation of wine or fermented or unfermented liquor, or distilled liquor or liquids of any kind, in tank or other cars.

The corporation was incorporated primarily for the purpose of taking over the car business of the California Wine Association, and of thus segregating the association's utility business (Subject to the jurisdiction of the California State Railroad Commission) from its non-utility business.

California Dispatch Line purchased eighty-five box cars, insulated box cars, steel tank cars, and insulated steel tank cars from California Wine Association. Forty of these cars are listed on the link below, with car numbers. There is no explanation of the difference between eighty-five cars and forty cars. (Note: As of 1950 California Dispatch Line/CDLX owned 396 tank cars. By 1955 the fleet was sold to General American.)

Information from Decisions of the Railroad Commission of the State of California, Volume 5, July 1, 1914 to December 31, 1914.

Link: https://tinyurl.com/y7pwrm2e

(Scroll up to Page 90.)

Tony Thompson wrote about the California Dispatch Line several times on his blog:

http://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/search?q=California+Dispatch+Line

He noted that the fleet of the California Dispatch Line eventually carried more than just wine.


Re: UP Side Door Caboose Survivor

David Allen
 

Forgot to sign -
Dave Allen of Marquette, MI


Re: UP Side Door Caboose Survivor

David Allen
 

But the SPLA&SL was built by two - Harriman and Senator William A. Clark. And Clark had a railroad through Rhyolite - the Las Vegas and Tonapah.

And there is a bit of mention in Don Strack's Bool, Cabooses of the Union Pacific, pg 123. Class NCS (Non-Common Standard) caboose LA&SL 3303 was built by Pullman in 1903 (previous number 4217) and was retired in 1928.



Re: Riveting Thoughts

al_brown03
 

I like Archers, even for small groups. The trick to getting just a few to stay put, I find, is to cut them from the sheet with a little extra film. I use half-strength Solvaset to set them, and then gloss-coat the car before doing anything else.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


Re: DODX Tank Car, Another View

Tim O'Connor
 


In addition to the cars built by ACF, there were additional cars of exactly the same type built
by General American. (attached)

Tim



I just turned up another photo of the same car which more clearly shows the details, including the car number (DODX 12100). This car is from series (DODX 11635-12374) that Richard Hendrickson cited as the prototype in his April 1996 RMJ article "Fifties-Era Welded Tank Cars from Red Caboose HO & O Scale Models".

One of these cars, DODX 12107 (as FR&W 12107: https://wplives.org/collectionpageimages/freightcarimages/tankcars/frw_12107_022709_DSC_4612.jpg ), survives at the Western Pacific Railroad Museum in Portola, California, and is likely the car Red Caboose measured. I wonder if others still exist?

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

Attachments:


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Riveting Thoughts

Tony Thompson
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:

Tony that's an excellent, well done project. Years ago I bought a bunch of the old McKean/FR 50 foot double door riveted box cars as fodder for SP box cars, because the McKean/FR riveted 50 foot cars all had the wide panels favored by the SP and the MP. But even with that they need additional rivets from Archer.

     Thanks, Tim.

Tony Thompson




Re: Riveting Thoughts

Tim O'Connor
 


Tony that's an excellent, well done project. Years ago I bought a bunch of the old McKean/FR 50 foot
double door riveted box cars as fodder for SP box cars, because the McKean/FR riveted 50 foot cars
all had the wide panels favored by the SP and the MP. But even with that they need additional rivets
from Archer.

Another consideration is the door opening. I think the Branchline models have 15 foot openings while
I think the McKean/FR models had 16 foot openings. The SP had cars of both sizes.

Tim O'


On 1/17/2019 2:03 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:
        I will confess to very rarely having harvested rivets (I use the remains of cut-up Athearn gondolas). The Archer rivets are so easy to manage, even for a couple of rivets, that I have used them very extensively. I did a 50-foot auto car (Branchline) on which I removed all the side rivets in order to change the number of side panels. The Archer rivets were a piece of cake and made the project really not difficult.
         I wrote a three-part blog post series about that project; if you are interested, see the link below.


Tony Thompson


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


deliver something other than livestock

Andy Carlson
 

Clark, such as this Q car?
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

On Monday, January 21, 2019, 9:19:17 AM PST, Clark Propst <cepropst@q.com> wrote:


They would line the cars with plywood and haul grain in them. Have photos.
Clark Propst


Re: the stock car in the lower right

Tim O'Connor
 

On the image below, anyone have any thoughts on the stock car in the lower right? Reporting marks might be SWSCL - can anyone confirm and/or elaborate?
 
 
Thanks
 
Claus Schlund

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: deliver something other than livestock

Clark Propst
 

They would line the cars with plywood and haul grain in them. Have photos.
Clark Propst


Re: deliver something other than livestock

Bill Daniels <billinsf@...>
 

Claus, versatility wasn’t the issue for these cars. It was to utilize otherwise idle rolling stock throughout most of the year when these cars were idle.

Bill Daniels


On Jan 21, 2019, at 7:39 AM, Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) <claus@...> wrote:

Oops, should also have included Mark in the list of adressees - sorry!
 
Thanks Mark!
 
Claus Schlund
 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, January 21, 2019 10:12 AM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] deliver something other than livestock

Hi Guy and List Members,
 
What a list - clearly a more versatile car than one would initially conclude!
 
Thanks
 
Claus Schlund
 
 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, January 21, 2019 9:13 AM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] deliver something other than livestock

Mark wrote:

"Commodities I've seen shipped in stock cars in photographs:

  • Coal. A LOT of coal in stock cars, in the Rocky Mountain States, as late as WWII
  • Beehive Oven Coke. Also as late as WWII
  • Railroad ties, treated and untreated
  • Ice -- some recent photos were posted on the D&RGW Facebook site showing pond ice loading in stock cars in the early 1960s
  • Freight Car Wheels
  • Lumber
  • Cabbages"

Additional commodities transported within stock cars included; watermelons, other various melons, and bagged potatoes.

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada



Re: Staley Tank Car question and modeling advice

Steve and Barb Hile
 

This car is an ACF product, like a Type 7 or 8.  An approach modeling this car could be from an F&C tank car kit, probably the high walkway car, with the running boards lowered.  What isn't clear from the on-line photos is whether the end sill of the kit has the trapezoid shaped end sill.  The hand rail across the tank ends are a notable feature.

Steve Hile

-----Original Message-----
From: Doug Forbes
Sent: Jan 21, 2019 10:04 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Staley Tank Car question and modeling advice

To all,
In looking for photos, I ran across this picture of a Staley tank car from the Decatur Herald and Review website.  I don't know much about tank cars and was wonder what type and any suggestions about how to maybe model such a car. 
Thanks,
Doug
 


Re: What Is It?

Tim O'Connor
 

On Jan 19, 2019, at 1:18 PM, Douglas Harding <doug.harding@...> wrote:

I’m with Ralph, the platform next to the telegraph pole looks like a hog drencher platform. Hogs were the only animals that required cooling off with a spray of water. Railroads that handled livestock, particularly hogs, had hog drenchers. Most consisted of a vertical pipe on a platform, with horizontal nozzles to spray the water. This one looks different from others I have seen.

 

And yes that is a steamboat on the far right edge of the photo. After all the photo was taken in Vicksburg MS, which is on the Mississippi River. You can see the river in the distance, behind the other train.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ralph W. Brown
Sent: Saturday, January 19, 2019 12:06 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] What Is It?

 

Hi Bob,

 

Looks like there is a water hose coiled at the right end of the platform and attached to the vertical pipe and valve, so I’d guess it’s a station for watering and/or cooling stock in stock cars.

 

Pax,

 

 

Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com

 

From: Bob Chaparro

Sent: Saturday, January 19, 2019 12:48 PM

Subject: [RealSTMFC] What Is It?

 

Can anyone identify the structure to the right of the string of freight cars in this photo?

https://www.lakestatesarchive.org/ICRR-8x10-sheet-film-negatives/i-xQrM6Gb/A

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

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