Date   

Re: Company Service Boxcar

Douglas Harding
 

Early rotary snowplows were steam powered and consumed lots of water as well as coal. They operated in extreme weather conditions, which was hard on man and machine. When something broke it was often in a location impossible to access. Water lines would freeze and break, requiring replacement parts and tools. Rotaries had to carry spare parts, etc. with them hence a supply car.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Richard Townsend via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, February 4, 2019 12:02 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Company Service Boxcar

 

Here's a photo of the D&SL's rotary plow.

 

http://digital.denverlibrary.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15330coll22/id/77529/rec/2

Richard Townsend

Lincoln City, OR

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Bob Chaparro <chiefbobbb@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Mon, Feb 4, 2019 9:40 am
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Company Service Boxcar

This is a link to a photo from the Denver Public Library:

The company service boxcar is stenciled "Rotary & Water Service Material".

"Water Service" I think I understand, but what is "Rotary"?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Company Service Boxcar

Jon Miller <atsfus@...>
 

On 2/4/2019 9:58 AM, Richard Townsend via Groups.Io wrote:
The company service boxcar is stenciled "Rotary & Water Service Material".
"Water Service" I think I understand, but what is "Rotary"?

    More interesting is what is in the car?

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
SPROG User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: Company Service Boxcar

Richard Townsend
 

Here's a photo of the D&SL's rotary plow.

http://digital.denverlibrary.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15330coll22/id/77529/rec/2

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Bob Chaparro <chiefbobbb@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Mon, Feb 4, 2019 9:40 am
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Company Service Boxcar

This is a link to a photo from the Denver Public Library:
The company service boxcar is stenciled "Rotary & Water Service Material".
"Water Service" I think I understand, but what is "Rotary"?
Thanks.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: Company Service Boxcar

Richard Townsend
 

Probably refers to the rotary snow plow.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Bob Chaparro <chiefbobbb@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Mon, Feb 4, 2019 9:40 am
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Company Service Boxcar

This is a link to a photo from the Denver Public Library:
The company service boxcar is stenciled "Rotary & Water Service Material".
"Water Service" I think I understand, but what is "Rotary"?
Thanks.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: Company Service Boxcar

Eric Hansmann
 

A rotary would be a mechanical snowplow often used on Rocky Mountain railroads in the winter to keep the tracks clear.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro
Sent: Monday, February 4, 2019 11:40 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Company Service Boxcar

 

This is a link to a photo from the Denver Public Library:

http://digital.denverlibrary.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15330coll22/id/30840/rec/5

The company service boxcar is stenciled "Rotary & Water Service Material".

"Water Service" I think I understand, but what is "Rotary"?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Company Service Boxcar

naptownprr
 

Could rotary possibly refer to a snowplow?


Jim Hunter


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Bob Chaparro <chiefbobbb@...>
Sent: Monday, February 4, 2019 12:40 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Company Service Boxcar
 

This is a link to a photo from the Denver Public Library:

http://digital.denverlibrary.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15330coll22/id/30840/rec/5

The company service boxcar is stenciled "Rotary & Water Service Material".

"Water Service" I think I understand, but what is "Rotary"?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Company Service Boxcar

Bob Chaparro
 

This is a link to a photo from the Denver Public Library:

http://digital.denverlibrary.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15330coll22/id/30840/rec/5

The company service boxcar is stenciled "Rotary & Water Service Material".

"Water Service" I think I understand, but what is "Rotary"?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Military loads.

Bill Welch
 

Ideal Buick for "Road Rage" encounters. . .

Bill Welch


Military loads.

Andy Carlson
 


It has been awhile now, but I was at the Western Pacific Railroad Museum at Portola, California shortly after the 2 donated 3 axle Army flat cars arrived. The museum was excited about having a flat car which, after rails were attached, could go around the country picking up museum applications. I believe this use was accomplished once when the news came that roller bearing conversion trucks could no longer be accepted in interchange. The last I saw of these flat cars was the 3 axle Buckeye pieces in a mill gon loaded with other scrap. Portola has a record of scrapping items after donation. The loss of a rust-free Alco RS3 cemented my quitting the group.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA
_._,_._,_


Re: Military loads.

Daniel A. Mitchell
 

Indeed Amtrak did end up with some of these. I’d forgotten seeing them in MofW service here in Michigan on Amtrak’s’own section of track (Kalamazoo, MI to Porter, IN, 110 mph).

Dan Mitchell
========== 

On Feb 4, 2019, at 2:23 AM, Charlie Vlk <cvlk@...> wrote:

All-
If I am not mistaken I saw a couple of the 1953 era cars in back of the AMTRAK ex PRR shop back in 2005 when I was there to take photos for a client.   I believe the car was lettered for AMTRAK and used to haul locomotive components between shops but I haven’t thought about the day for over a decade and could have some of the details wrong.
Charlie Vlk
 


Re: Military loads.

Bruce Smith
 

Dan,

Getting off topic, but a quick response - Trident did an HO scale mixed media resin and photo-etch M-18 Hellcat a number of years ago. I have 2 awaiting construction and loading onto a steam era flat car. I will likely leave them “untarped” as the fighting compartment is quite detailed.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."




On Feb 4, 2019, at 8:49 AM, Daniel A. Mitchell <danmitch@...> wrote:

Or a museum, VFW hall, or other display, or being shipped overseas to some friendly 3rd-world army. Many obsolete military vehicles end up in such places. Some (often large groups) are then shipped back to the USA for rebuilding or modernization, then returned to their current owners. Also, commercial weapons dealers buy such for resale, and ship them wherever needed.

As one example …

I’m a crew member on a restored M-18 “Hellcat” tank destroyer. The M-18s were all built by Buick Motors (General Motors) here in Flint, MI. Ours was shipped to Europe in 1944. They ended up in Europe at the end of WWII. Most of the European countries lost all their military equipment during the war. The surplus USA equipment cost more to return to the USA than it was worth, so it was given away to friendly nations to rebuild their armies. Next, our M-18 was shipped back to the USA for rebuilding by a private contractor, then it was shipped back to Europe, and ended up in the Yugoslavian Army. Then, with the collapse of the Soviet Union, Yugoslavia descended into civil war in 1991. Our then ancient M-18 found itself back in combat again. Then the United Nations stepped in and removed all their heavy weapons. Six of the M-18s were purchased by a weapons-dealer in Great Britain, and shipped there. Our local (Flint, MI) Sloan Museum got word of it and arranged to have General Motors purchase one for their “Buick Collection”. Buick built no cars in 1944, just Hellcats, so it’s the only "1944 Buick" there is. Anyway, in 2002 it was shipped back to the USA, to Flint, and we spent two years doing a complete restoration of it to running condition. So … it went back and forth across the Atlantic FOUR times, plus a trip to England, and at least four trips to/from several locations in the USA over a 60-year period. LOTS of history for this vehicle, and a LOT of time being moved about. Now it’s back home.

<M-18 Hellcat - @Back To The Bricks, Flint,MI. - Aug.18,2013 - RMW (edit., tiny).jpg>

I’d love to do an HO model of a few Hellcats beign shipped out of Buick on the Pere Marquette RR. We have photos of solid trains of them, two to a flat car. Sometimes they were tarped, and at least one was crated (why ?). Unfortunately, despite all the HO military vehicles produced by many manufacturers, and some 3D printed ones, nobody’s yet done a decent M-18. Future project ...

Dan Mitchell
==========
On Feb 3, 2019, at 5:52 PM, Allen Cain <Allencaintn@...> wrote:

Brian,
 
Of course if the tank was too early for your era, could you model one going to the scrap yard?
 
Allen Cain
 



Re: Military loads.

Daniel A. Mitchell
 

Or a museum, VFW hall, or other display, or being shipped overseas to some friendly 3rd-world army. Many obsolete military vehicles end up in such places. Some (often large groups) are then shipped back to the USA for rebuilding or modernization, then returned to their current owners. Also, commercial weapons dealers buy such for resale, and ship them wherever needed.

As one example …

I’m a crew member on a restored M-18 “Hellcat” tank destroyer. The M-18s were all built by Buick Motors (General Motors) here in Flint, MI. Ours was shipped to Europe in 1944. They ended up in Europe at the end of WWII. Most of the European countries lost all their military equipment during the war. The surplus USA equipment cost more to return to the USA than it was worth, so it was given away to friendly nations to rebuild their armies. Next, our M-18 was shipped back to the USA for rebuilding by a private contractor, then it was shipped back to Europe, and ended up in the Yugoslavian Army. Then, with the collapse of the Soviet Union, Yugoslavia descended into civil war in 1991. Our then ancient M-18 found itself back in combat again. Then the United Nations stepped in and removed all their heavy weapons. Six of the M-18s were purchased by a weapons-dealer in Great Britain, and shipped there. Our local (Flint, MI) Sloan Museum got word of it and arranged to have General Motors purchase one for their “Buick Collection”. Buick built no cars in 1944, just Hellcats, so it’s the only "1944 Buick" there is. Anyway, in 2002 it was shipped back to the USA, to Flint, and we spent two years doing a complete restoration of it to running condition. So … it went back and forth across the Atlantic FOUR times, plus a trip to England, and at least four trips to/from several locations in the USA over a 60-year period. LOTS of history for this vehicle, and a LOT of time being moved about. Now it’s back home.


I’d love to do an HO model of a few Hellcats beign shipped out of Buick on the Pere Marquette RR. We have photos of solid trains of them, two to a flat car. Sometimes they were tarped, and at least one was crated (why ?). Unfortunately, despite all the HO military vehicles produced by many manufacturers, and some 3D printed ones, nobody’s yet done a decent M-18. Future project ...

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Feb 3, 2019, at 5:52 PM, Allen Cain <Allencaintn@...> wrote:

Brian,
 
Of course if the tank was too early for your era, could you model one going to the scrap yard?
 
Allen Cain
 


Re: Military loads.

james murrie
 

There are pictures of whole battalions of M-48 tanks of Wisconsin National Guard's 32nd Infantry Division being loaded for transport to Ft. Lewis WA, October 1961 on regular MILW flats; some had 2 per car, some had one.  Pictures were printed in both Railway Age and MILW employee magazines.  Unable to read car numbers, but they were definitely not 100 ton cars.


Re: Military loads.

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Friends,

Quite a bit of military railroad equipment was distributed to museums across the country when declared surplus. Attached is what I remember as an ex-military car at the California State Railroad Museum shortly after delivery about 15 years ago. They had another ex-military flat car attached to this one, but it wasn't in a position that allowed photos. Also there that day was an ex-Air Force 40' PS-1 boxcar.

The second photo shows an older ex-military flat car still used in MW service on the Shenandoah Valley Railroad.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 2/4/19 2:23 AM, Charlie Vlk wrote:

All-

If I am not mistaken I saw a couple of the 1953 era cars in back of the AMTRAK ex PRR shop back in 2005 when I was there to take photos for a client.   I believe the car was lettered for AMTRAK and used to haul locomotive components between shops but I haven’t thought about the day for over a decade and could have some of the details wrong.

Charlie Vlk

 



Re: Military loads.

Charlie Vlk
 

All-

If I am not mistaken I saw a couple of the 1953 era cars in back of the AMTRAK ex PRR shop back in 2005 when I was there to take photos for a client.   I believe the car was lettered for AMTRAK and used to haul locomotive components between shops but I haven’t thought about the day for over a decade and could have some of the details wrong.

Charlie Vlk

 


Re: Military loads.

Richard Townsend
 

It might be a little misleading to think of the prototypes for the Roco model of the USAX 38000 series as a 60's era car. The prototypes were built in 1953, but of course they were around in the 60's, too. They first appeared in the October 1952 ORER (I understand that sometimes cars appeared in the ORER before they actually were delivered).

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Daniel A. Mitchell <danmitch@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Sun, Feb 3, 2019 1:27 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Military loads.

In most cases they load a car to something like its capacity in either length of weight. Many armored vehicles were heavy enough to require either “single” loading or a vary heavy duty flatcar (100-tons plus). An ordinary truck, like an M-35 “Deuce and a Half”, could easily be loaded two to a car.

Of course, it they only had one to ship, it’d be on one car.

Today the Dept of Defense (DODX) has a lot of very heavy 6-axle flatcars. These routinely carry two M-1 Abrams tanks (which weigh around 70 tons each, so that’s 140 tons per car).

In WWII an M4 Sherman tank only weighed about 32 tons, so two could be carried on one 70-ton flatcar.

I just finished doing an HO model of an M-48 Patton tank (~55 tons) on an older U.S. Army 6-axle flat. The car has a 100 ton capacity.

Just FYI. The old ROCO 6-axle flats are BOTH 1960’s vintage U.S. Army prototypes. The regular flatcar was for general use. The depressed-center flat is the transport carrier for the M-103 Heavy Tank (though it may well have been used for other things too).

Dan Mitchell
==========


> On Feb 3, 2019, at 3:14 PM, Brian Carlson via Groups.Io <prrk41361=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
>
> Years ago after seeing a photo of military truck load in either the RPC article on loads or in an article, I picked up a Roco Minitanks M35 to create a load.
>
> Now after thinking about the August 1957 era I Model I’m wondering if a single M35 on a flatcar would be a common load.  Did military loads commonly move in singles/separate moves in my era.
>
> I wasn’t around then so hoping for advice.
>
> Brian J. Carlson
>
>
>




Re: Military loads.

Charles Peck
 

One might think that some seriously obsolete pieces might be getting donated to
a VFW hall or some such.  That would be an individual shipment.
Chuck Peck 

On Sun, Feb 3, 2019 at 6:34 PM George Courtney via Groups.Io <gsc3=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Most of the National Guard units in my area had retired tanks or artillery pieces.  I wonder if they moved by mostly by rail or totally by truck.

George Courtney


Re: Military loads.

gary laakso
 

Plus, many weapons were exported to allies and, perhaps, one tank was cheaper for parts than components alone were.

Gary Laakso
Northwest of Mike Brock


On Feb 3, 2019, at 3:34 PM, George Courtney via Groups.Io <gsc3@...> wrote:

Most of the National Guard units in my area had retired tanks or artillery pieces.  I wonder if they moved by mostly by rail or totally by truck.

George Courtney


Re: Military loads.

George Courtney
 

Most of the National Guard units in my area had retired tanks or artillery pieces.  I wonder if they moved by mostly by rail or totally by truck.

George Courtney


Re: Military loads.

Dave Owens
 

The USAX/DODX cars were built for the Army because the Patton tank family was too heavy for standard railroad flats. The cars operated into the early 90s and some can still be found in MOW service on Amtrak. I caught one a few years ago along the New Haven to  Springfield line in Hartford, Conn.

Jim Eager moved the bolsters on the cars. As built by Roco, they are a little off. Otherwise, the Roco car is a very nice match for the Magor USAX/DODX 38000 series car.

I have about 70 of these cars I've modified and operate as a unit train. It's out of the steam era,, though.

Also, all the references I have seen indicate these cars were painted green.

Here's one that has been restored to its original paint scheme at the Age of  Steam Roundhouse in Sugarcreek, Ohio.

John Frantz, the proprietor of  Mount  Vernon  Shops decals, helped with the  lettering on this  car.

Dave Owens
West Hartford, Conn.





On Sun, Feb 3, 2019 at 5:52 PM Allen Cain <Allencaintn@...> wrote:

Brian,

 

Of course if the tank was too early for your era, could you model one going to the scrap yard?

 

Allen Cain

 

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