Date   
Re: Trix Stock Cars--was MORE ON NORTHERN PACIFIC STOCK CARS

Bryian Sones
 

Steve,

I did the same for my Trix/Marklini U.P. Stock Cars. The Acurail underframe lines up fairly well with very light sanding. For the Trix/Marklin U.P.  Box cars I use the Speedwitch underframes. 


Regards,

Bryian Sones
Union Pacific Prototype Modeler
Murrieta, CA


On Monday, February 4, 2019 11:34 AM, StephenK <thekays100@...> wrote:


I also modified Trix hoppers and have a nice train of a dozen cars.   I have also rebuilt the underframes on a half dozen CA-3s, and a few boxcars.   I skipped the Speedwitch underbody (which I know is accurate -- http://speedwitchmedia.com/product/p105-union-pacific-welded-underframe-for-box-cars/ ) and went for the easier/cheaper but not quite accurate Accurail 40' underframe -- http://www.accurail.com/accurail/art/Details/106.jpg .   On the boxcar it fits with only a few swipes of a file, and the car and couplers ride at the correct height.   Assuming the stock car is using the same Trix underframe as the boxcar, this would be a good choice.   The Speedwitch part is correct for boxcars, but I doubt it is correct for the stock cars.

Steve Kay


Re: Trix Stock Cars--was MORE ON NORTHERN PACIFIC STOCK CARS

mopacfirst
 

Hadn't thought of that, in fact I haven't torn into this car.  I'm only going to do one.  But if there's a height issue with the car, that would definitely be easier.

Ron Merrick

Re: Painting Brass

Tim O'Connor
 


Hal is a master of painting and rebuilding brass steam locomotives.


On 2/4/2019 3:14 PM, James SANDIFER wrote:

This is a nearly 2 hour painting brass clinic that is on YouTube. It is excellent. I learned a good bit from it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cs6SPzZjauA

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

Re: Company Service Boxcar

mofwcaboose
 

Another possibility is that the car contained small water tanks similar to those on pickle cars. Certain railroads, such as the Katy and the Milwaukee Road, built water cars like that for use mostly in camp outfits. The cars usually had a caboose stove or two to keep the water from freezing in winter.

John C. La Rue, Jr.
Bonita Springs, FL


-----Original Message-----
From: Douglas Harding <doug.harding@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Mon, 4 Feb 2019 13:38
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Company Service Boxcar

Early rotary snowplows were steam powered and consumed lots of water as well as coal. They operated in extreme weather conditions, which was hard on man and machine. When something broke it was often in a location impossible to access. Water lines would freeze and break, requiring replacement parts and tools. Rotaries had to carry spare parts, etc. with them hence a supply car.
 
Doug  Harding
www.iowacentralrr.org
 
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Richard Townsend via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, February 4, 2019 12:02 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Company Service Boxcar
 
Here's a photo of the D&SL's rotary plow.
 
http://digital.denverlibrary.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15330coll22/id/77529/rec/2
Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Bob Chaparro <chiefbobbb@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Mon, Feb 4, 2019 9:40 am
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Company Service Boxcar
This is a link to a photo from the Denver Public Library:
The company service boxcar is stenciled "Rotary & Water Service Material".
"Water Service" I think I understand, but what is "Rotary"?
Thanks.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA

Painting Brass

James SANDIFER
 

This is a nearly 2 hour painting brass clinic that is on YouTube. It is excellent. I learned a good bit from it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cs6SPzZjauA

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

Re: Company Service Boxcar

Todd Sullivan
 

I looked more closely at that boxcar, and it looks to me like it is off its trucks and on the ground.  The car is much lower than the loco, and if you look at the bottom of the siding between the wheels at the left edge of the photo and the pile of castings on the ground in front of the loco, it looks like there is about 3" of dark shadow.  That's not consistent with a car on its trucks.  What's visible through the door looks like pipes or other cylindrical objects.  The boxcar might simply be a storage shed for water and rotary supplies.

Todd Sullivan.

Trix Stock Cars--was MORE ON NORTHERN PACIFIC STOCK CARS

StephenK
 

I also modified Trix hoppers and have a nice train of a dozen cars.   I have also rebuilt the underframes on a half dozen CA-3s, and a few boxcars.   I skipped the Speedwitch underbody (which I know is accurate -- http://speedwitchmedia.com/product/p105-union-pacific-welded-underframe-for-box-cars/ ) and went for the easier/cheaper but not quite accurate Accurail 40' underframe -- http://www.accurail.com/accurail/art/Details/106.jpg .   On the boxcar it fits with only a few swipes of a file, and the car and couplers ride at the correct height.   Assuming the stock car is using the same Trix underframe as the boxcar, this would be a good choice.   The Speedwitch part is correct for boxcars, but I doubt it is correct for the stock cars.

Steve Kay

Re: Military loads.

Ken Adams
 

Off topic because it is current rather than steam era. This is an almost model like drone view of a current day military rail move descending Cuesta grade into San Luis Obispo. Fascinating and also why many choose to model this area.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PT1lYx1sZys

I spent 19 months in the 3rd Armored Division in Germany 1967-69. As a result I would not consider myself very pro-military but I will model military subjects when I feel they are of historical importance and related to my theoretical layout needs.

Steam Era Content


This is an Accurail 36 foot boxcar reworked to match the actual car now in the Western Railway Museum collection in Rio Vista California. It has been "restored" to D&RGW paint scheme it carried before the US Navy bought the car in 1944 to replace equipment destroyed in the July 1944 explosion that leveled the Port Chicago (California) navy docks and surrounding area.

Re: Military loads.

Bruce Smith
 

Jim,

I’ll add that within the period of this list, there were multiple military actions that saw significant mobilizations or movements of military forces that would rationalize large scale movements, beyond the three majors conflicts (WWI, WWII, Korea), along with a nearly continuous post WWII arms race with the Soviets and Communist China, that saw regular individual movement of military vehicles, be they new, used, reconditioned, or crapped out and done. Before dismissing such moves as “unusual” I would suggest that each modeler consider the routing possible for the individual area that they model and work with the understanding that these moves were actually pretty common in the overall scheme of things… given that, again, within the era of the list, these things did not move long distance over highways.

Of course, I have no struggle rationalizing massive movements of military loads, given my June 1944 modeling date ;)

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."




On Feb 4, 2019, at 1:01 PM, Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:

Jim Betz wrote:

  Have -I- seen pictures of military loads/equipment from the transition?
Yes, if it is during the war, not many if it is immediately post war (except
for trains directly related to the wind down), and very few if it was 1950 or
later.

    Jim, I hope you are not forgetting that there was a Korean War.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: Military loads.

Dave Owens
 

Hi James:
Are those images scannable?
I'd love to see them.
Thanks,
Dave Owens

Re: Military loads.

Tony Thompson
 

Jim Betz wrote:

  Have -I- seen pictures of military loads/equipment from the transition?
Yes, if it is during the war, not many if it is immediately post war (except
for trains directly related to the wind down), and very few if it was 1950 or
later.

    Jim, I hope you are not forgetting that there was a Korean War.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Military loads.

Jim Betz
 

Hi,
  I'm going to take a different tack on this entire thread.  Guys - I am probably
-JUST- as pro-military as most of the people on this list ("above average").  But ...

  As Richard H. would have said and Tony T. has pointed out many times ....
"be careful about what you do/don't put on your layout".  Just because it can
be justified as possible doesn't mean you should be running it regularly.
  I think this 'rule/guideline' applies just as much to military equipment on a
transition era layout as it does to those oddball/"I just love this car" freight
equipment.
  I'm asking "if you have to go to great lengths to justify it"? ... then it probably
doesn't "fit" on your layout for even a third of the sessions on your layout.

  ===> Can you run them every once in a while?  Of course you can.
  ===> Can you apply the "it's my RR" rule?  Of course you can!
  ===> Were they seen on very many trains in the late 40's and later?  No.

  So - IF - you care about prototypical accuracy/believability then you need to
pretty carefully "curb your enthusiasm" ... or acknowledge that "it isn't exactly
prototypical but I'm gonna do it any way".

  Have -I- seen pictures of military loads/equipment from the transition?
Yes, if it is during the war, not many if it is immediately post war (except
for trains directly related to the wind down), and very few if it was 1950 or
later.

  Some obvious exceptions - if your layout has an on layout "industry" that is
military related (base, military dock, etc.).  Or if you are actually modelling
WWII era.

  But you know what - if your layout is based in the "middlee 40's" .... you
can still get away without having -ayny- military loads/cars and it can still
be "prototypically believable".
                                                             - just saying ... Jim B.  

Re: Company Service Boxcar

Douglas Harding
 

Early rotary snowplows were steam powered and consumed lots of water as well as coal. They operated in extreme weather conditions, which was hard on man and machine. When something broke it was often in a location impossible to access. Water lines would freeze and break, requiring replacement parts and tools. Rotaries had to carry spare parts, etc. with them hence a supply car.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Richard Townsend via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, February 4, 2019 12:02 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Company Service Boxcar

 

Here's a photo of the D&SL's rotary plow.

 

http://digital.denverlibrary.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15330coll22/id/77529/rec/2

Richard Townsend

Lincoln City, OR

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Bob Chaparro <chiefbobbb@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Mon, Feb 4, 2019 9:40 am
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Company Service Boxcar

This is a link to a photo from the Denver Public Library:

The company service boxcar is stenciled "Rotary & Water Service Material".

"Water Service" I think I understand, but what is "Rotary"?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Re: Company Service Boxcar

Jon Miller
 

On 2/4/2019 9:58 AM, Richard Townsend via Groups.Io wrote:
The company service boxcar is stenciled "Rotary & Water Service Material".
"Water Service" I think I understand, but what is "Rotary"?

    More interesting is what is in the car?

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
SPROG User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS

Re: Company Service Boxcar

Richard Townsend
 

Here's a photo of the D&SL's rotary plow.

http://digital.denverlibrary.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15330coll22/id/77529/rec/2

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Bob Chaparro <chiefbobbb@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Mon, Feb 4, 2019 9:40 am
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Company Service Boxcar

This is a link to a photo from the Denver Public Library:
The company service boxcar is stenciled "Rotary & Water Service Material".
"Water Service" I think I understand, but what is "Rotary"?
Thanks.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA

Re: Company Service Boxcar

Richard Townsend
 

Probably refers to the rotary snow plow.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Bob Chaparro <chiefbobbb@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Mon, Feb 4, 2019 9:40 am
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Company Service Boxcar

This is a link to a photo from the Denver Public Library:
The company service boxcar is stenciled "Rotary & Water Service Material".
"Water Service" I think I understand, but what is "Rotary"?
Thanks.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA

Re: Company Service Boxcar

Eric Hansmann
 

A rotary would be a mechanical snowplow often used on Rocky Mountain railroads in the winter to keep the tracks clear.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro
Sent: Monday, February 4, 2019 11:40 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Company Service Boxcar

 

This is a link to a photo from the Denver Public Library:

http://digital.denverlibrary.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15330coll22/id/30840/rec/5

The company service boxcar is stenciled "Rotary & Water Service Material".

"Water Service" I think I understand, but what is "Rotary"?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Re: Company Service Boxcar

naptownprr
 

Could rotary possibly refer to a snowplow?


Jim Hunter


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Bob Chaparro <chiefbobbb@...>
Sent: Monday, February 4, 2019 12:40 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Company Service Boxcar
 

This is a link to a photo from the Denver Public Library:

http://digital.denverlibrary.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15330coll22/id/30840/rec/5

The company service boxcar is stenciled "Rotary & Water Service Material".

"Water Service" I think I understand, but what is "Rotary"?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Company Service Boxcar

Bob Chaparro
 

This is a link to a photo from the Denver Public Library:

http://digital.denverlibrary.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15330coll22/id/30840/rec/5

The company service boxcar is stenciled "Rotary & Water Service Material".

"Water Service" I think I understand, but what is "Rotary"?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Re: Military loads.

Bill Welch
 

Ideal Buick for "Road Rage" encounters. . .

Bill Welch