Date   

Re: Photo Links From The Oregon Historical Society

Bruce Smith
 

Bill,


Chalkmarks, as often noted here, are usually indecipherable as to meaning. They belonged to local crews.


Regards,

Bruce Smith




From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Bill Keene via Groups.Io <bill41@...>
Sent: Friday, February 15, 2019 3:13 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo Links From The Oregon Historical Society
 
Thanks Bob,

Re the cord wood photo: Are the chalk marks on the truck bolster ends some data regarding lubrication? Or perhaps something else?

Re the tank car photo:  Nice billboard in the background advertising the Portland Rose

Cheers,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA



On Feb 15, 2019, at 11:55 AM, Bob Chaparro <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

These can be enlarged quite a bit. Just click on the photo.
Derailed Tank Cars:
Car With Cord Wood
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: Bad Ladder Day

Bruce Smith
 

But definitely not the car in question 😉

Regards

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL




From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>
Sent: Friday, February 15, 2019 7:32 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Bad Ladder Day
 

40 foot steel ice reefers built by General American in 1934


On 2/15/2019 3:34 PM, Ralph W. Brown wrote:
Hi Bruce,
 
Milwaukee is hardly my area of expertise, but I enlarged the photo to see whether I read any dimensional data and found nothing helpful.  The car looked a bit short to me as well.  The shot is pretty much a broadside, so after measuring the image length of a wheel (1.5”), which I presume to be 33”, measuring the image length of the car (20 7/8”), and doing the math, I found a calculated length of 38’ 2.15”.  Similarly, the height of the roof above the railhead (excluding the roof walk) worked out to 13’ 3.5”, and the height of the car from the bottom of the floor worked out to 9’ 10.25”.  The car appears to be about halfway between a 36’ reefer and a 40’ reefer.  That strikes me as unusual, don’t you think?
 
I was also able to read an “ICE CAR” designation, a 70000 capacity, and what appears to be a 7-69 reweigh date.  Whoever speculated that the car was in company service may well have been correct.
 
Pax,
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 
Sent: Friday, February 15, 2019 2:25 PM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Bad Ladder Day
 

Folks,

Can anyone provide some background on this reefer? Hard to miss the horizontal seam. On my browser it almost appears to be shorter than 40'

Regards,

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL




From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
Sent: Friday, February 15, 2019 12:24 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Bad Ladder Day
 
On Fri, Feb 15, 2019 at 09:54 AM, earlyrail wrote:
Nice view of a MILW ice reefer.
Many of these were painted as medium/light blue.
The car is marked ICE SERVICE. In spite of the fact that it does not appear to have a company service number, I believe these were used only in company service.

Earlier the MILW had some wood cars in the same service, painted the same medium blue.

Dennis Storzek



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Transition era railway operations documentary cartoon

Bill Daniels <billinsf@...>
 

Tim,

I got a smile out of the name of the streamliner...

Bill Daniels San Francisco, CA


On Friday, February 15, 2019, 6:29:57 PM PST, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:



Reflects a surprising amount of common knowledge of railway ops in the
steam era...


:-)

Tim O'




--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*




Re: A quick update on John Greene

golden1014
 

Thanks Pierre.  I’m in contact with John often.  He will be at St Louis in July doing another kit bash clinic.

John Golden
Ramstein AB, Ger


Re: Photo Links From The Oregon Historical Society

Steve and Barb Hile
 

Ted found this photo about a year ago and we added it to the book. There
are two Class V cars in this picture, the one on the left is a 10,000 gallon
car, which makes this a pretty rare view as most of the larger Class V cars
were off the roster before many in service photos were being taken. The
five radial courses contrast with the three courses on the 6500 gallon car
on the right, both of which show some evidence of having STANDARD painted on
their sides.

The other interesting thing is the apparent integrity of the tank despite
damage to all of the things that were attached to it. John Van Dyke was 50
plus years ahead of his time with respect to a tank car not really needing
an underframe.

Steve Hile

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf
Of Earl Tuson
Sent: Friday, February 15, 2019 8:16 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo Links From The Oregon Historical Society

They look like 6,000 gallon UTLX Type X cars lettered for Standard Oil.
Those would be Type V (Van Dyke) cars. Note how the draft sills end shortly
after the bolster and the brake reservoir hangs on a bracket riveted
directly to the bottom sheet.

Earl Tuson


Re: Photo Links From The Oregon Historical Society

Earl Tuson
 

They look like 6,000 gallon UTLX Type X cars lettered for Standard Oil.
And the left car is 8,000 or more gallons: note the dual relief valves and the 5 courses.

Earl Tuson


Transition era railway operations documentary cartoon

Tim O'Connor
 

Reflects a surprising amount of common knowledge of railway ops in the steam era...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MzwxL6305Q4

:-)

Tim O'




--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Re: Photo Links From The Oregon Historical Society

Earl Tuson
 

They look like 6,000 gallon UTLX Type X cars lettered for Standard Oil.
Those would be Type V (Van Dyke) cars. Note how the draft sills end shortly after the bolster and the
brake reservoir hangs on a bracket riveted directly to the bottom sheet.

Earl Tuson


Re: FGEX Hutchins roof

Earl Tuson
 

Dennis explains:

The purpose of this is so the bolts pass through the fascia of the car, making the nuts accessible from
outside the car. This means that damaged roof panels can be replaced from outside the car; no need to
disturb the lining or insulation, or load, for that matter.

Ah ha! After my post’s initial crickets, I got out my (borrowed) copy of the ‘31 CBC, and began to think,
without the benefit of the correct reference drawing, that perhaps the roof used a lag screw going into the
wooden plate for the same reason Dennis gives above- access to the underside of the roof would have been
nigh impossible. But a standard bolt would be much more inline with standard construction techniques.
Thank you for sharing that.

And I’d completely agree that, consequently, there would be no use for such a fastener position on an Xm.

Last thing, perhaps for you Bill: when was the first application of these roofs? Pieter’s given me the
indication that they really aren’t appropriate for 1930, the rebuilds being from the later 1930’s.

Earl Tuson


Re: Bad Ladder Day

mopacfirst
 

One more reason I think this car, and I can't generalize beyond this single example, is an ex-Swift car, is that if you look closely at the ends, they appear to be one of those semi-dartnot designs where only one set of darts at the sides of the end is used.  Between every other major corrugation below the topmost one, the end is flat.  That's fairly well visible on the shot of this Milwaukee ice car, and is pretty clear on the similar broadside of the SRLX car I referenced above.  There could have been other meat reefers built this way, so this isn't a positive identification.

Ron Merrick


Re: Bad Ladder Day

cptracks
 

Or for that matter True Line Trains who produced a ton of Canadian 8 hatches in different road names

Colin Riley



On Friday, February 15, 2019, 5:41:06 p.m. PST, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


Scott

Funny you should say that, since Al Westerfield and Martin Lofton must
have produced
100 different reefers that were not any of those! To say nothing of
Brian Pate (CP, NP) or
F&C (Canadian brine reefers).

Tim O'Connor



On 2/15/2019 8:24 PM, Scott wrote:
> Does not seem to be too much love for reefers outside of SFRD, PFE and
> FGEX.
>
> Scott McDonald



--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*




Re: Bad Ladder Day

Tim O'Connor
 

Scott

Funny you should say that, since Al Westerfield and Martin Lofton must have produced
100 different reefers that were not any of those! To say nothing of Brian Pate (CP, NP) or
F&C (Canadian brine reefers).

Tim O'Connor

On 2/15/2019 8:24 PM, Scott wrote:
Does not seem to be too much love for reefers outside of SFRD, PFE and FGEX.

Scott McDonald
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Re: Duryea UF applications

mopacfirst
 

These 50 foot, mid-50s built Duryea underframes are the ne plus ultra (there is nothing beyond) of Duryea underframes.  Branchline conveniently overlooked this issue with the otherwise well-executed plug-door RBL they produced.  Besides the scratchbuilt one referred to above, there is nothing available.  If there was, you could perhaps wrap it around an existing AAR center sill such as on the Branchline cars.

The scratchbuilt one does have the AAR centersill as its basis.

Ron Merrick


Re: Bad Ladder Day

Tim O'Connor
 


40 foot steel ice reefers built by General American in 1934


On 2/15/2019 3:34 PM, Ralph W. Brown wrote:
Hi Bruce,
 
Milwaukee is hardly my area of expertise, but I enlarged the photo to see whether I read any dimensional data and found nothing helpful.  The car looked a bit short to me as well.  The shot is pretty much a broadside, so after measuring the image length of a wheel (1.5”), which I presume to be 33”, measuring the image length of the car (20 7/8”), and doing the math, I found a calculated length of 38’ 2.15”.  Similarly, the height of the roof above the railhead (excluding the roof walk) worked out to 13’ 3.5”, and the height of the car from the bottom of the floor worked out to 9’ 10.25”.  The car appears to be about halfway between a 36’ reefer and a 40’ reefer.  That strikes me as unusual, don’t you think?
 
I was also able to read an “ICE CAR” designation, a 70000 capacity, and what appears to be a 7-69 reweigh date.  Whoever speculated that the car was in company service may well have been correct.
 
Pax,
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 
From: Bruce Smith
Sent: Friday, February 15, 2019 2:25 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Bad Ladder Day
 

Folks,

Can anyone provide some background on this reefer? Hard to miss the horizontal seam. On my browser it almost appears to be shorter than 40'

Regards,

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL




From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
Sent: Friday, February 15, 2019 12:24 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Bad Ladder Day
 
On Fri, Feb 15, 2019 at 09:54 AM, earlyrail wrote:
Nice view of a MILW ice reefer.
Many of these were painted as medium/light blue.
The car is marked ICE SERVICE. In spite of the fact that it does not appear to have a company service number, I believe these were used only in company service.

Earlier the MILW had some wood cars in the same service, painted the same medium blue.

Dennis Storzek



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Bad Ladder Day

Scott
 

Does not seem to be too much love for reefers outside of SFRD, PFE and FGEX.

Scott McDonald


Re: Bad Ladder Day

Scott
 

The Milwaukee got their reefers from URTX.  The hinges and double latch bars are a feature of those cars for sure.

Scott McDonald


Re: Duryea UF applications

Tim O'Connor
 


Sadly, there is no Duryea advertising in the 1953 CBC and that drawing is evidently gone too. :-(

I've attached a Duryea drawing for a 50 foot flat car from the 1940 CBC. I haven't got a clue about
whose car it is.

Tim


On 2/15/2019 1:29 PM, william darnaby wrote:

On page 302 of the 1949-1951 issue of the Car Builders Cyclopedia are plans of a B&O M-55 boxcar that clearly show the Duryea UF in detail.  It has solid cross-bearers.

 

Bill Darnaby




--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Bad Ladder Day

Tim O'Connor
 


Yes blue is company service. The MILW continued to operate orange 40 foot ice reefers into the 1970's.


On 2/15/2019 1:24 PM, Dennis Storzek wrote:
On Fri, Feb 15, 2019 at 09:54 AM, earlyrail wrote:
Nice view of a MILW ice reefer.
Many of these were painted as medium/light blue.
The car is marked ICE SERVICE. In spite of the fact that it does not appear to have a company service number, I believe these were used only in company service.

Earlier the MILW had some wood cars in the same service, painted the same medium blue.

Dennis Storzek


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Bad Ladder Day

Tim O'Connor
 


What is the name or designation for that type of door and why are there no models? :-D

Tim O'Connor


On 2/15/2019 12:37 PM, gary laakso wrote:

Here are the results when the Milwaukee had a bad ladder day:

 

http://rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=4769374 

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock




--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Flat car vertical brake wheel staff supports.

Peter Ness
 

Bill,

 

Thanks very much for pointing out the sprue for flat cars – I’ve used the AB set so often I haven’t taken the time to see what else is there. Lesson learned!

 

Peter Ness

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