Date   

Heywood Oil Syndicate Tank Cars

Bob Chaparro
 

This photo is from the Louisiana Digital Library.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA



Re: Books and Magazines

 

The books in that series by Tom Taber and by Ben Kline have been reprinted at least once but remain difficult to find.  The books by Walt Casler have not been reprinted and probably never will be reprinted.  There is also an Index volume for the series.  It is almost impossible to find.  I am lucky to have the entire series including the index.


Re: MDT 6000 Series Roof Question

Tom Madden
 

I was under the impression that the Sunshine MDT/NRC wood reefers were from the same family as the Sunshine Santa Fe Rr 5-9, 11 wood reefers. The Santa Fe ones came with either a replacement panel steel roof or a "wood roof". The latter has 11 seam caps and hatch mounts.

Tom Madden


Cutting Into a Perfectly Fine Model Part 2

Bill Welch
 

More READING Door Replacement: As I noted earlier I nicked the door frame when I was cutting the old door away so this morning I repaired it using short sections of 0.030 styrene rod, first tacked into place w/Testors and then bonded in place with my reliable "Duro" Cyanoacrylate. I let this cure for a couple of hours and then trimmed and filed until it was impossible to tell I had ever messed up. While it was curing I added .020 x .030 strip styrene to my door blank, using a High School drafting technique taught to me by my friend Pierre Oliver to sort out the correct spacing. Here I used Tamiya's Super Thin as it sets up quickly and after about 30 minutes trimmed the ends off and made the wire door handle. I think it looks pretty good when set in place. I am very pleased with how this has turned out. I will wait to secure the door permanently until I do the other side because I need it to serve as a cutting guide for the second door. There are a couple gaps—I will use slivers of 0.005 styrene to fill these and melt it with Testors.

Bill Welch


MDT 6000 Series Roof Question

David
 

The roof in question is the SRE Murphy Solidsteel roof of the 1920s. 11 seam caps, and ten panels (12 counting the end panels with the hatches). Easiest starting point would be the Yarmouth "Murphy flat panel" roof: http://www.yarmouthmodelworks.com/index.php/Products/4238R

David Thompson


Re: Signaling item

Larry Smith
 

Just got a message from showcase minatures.  They are in stock and are kept in stock.  Call them and they will ship asap.

Larry Smith

On Tuesday, February 19, 2019, 6:01:05 PM CST, Charles Tapper via Groups.Io <charlestapper@...> wrote:


Showcase Miniatures has pictures of that dwarf, formerly Century Foundry,  but I cannot ascertain if it is stock. 

Charlie Tapper


On Feb 19, 2019, at 4:33 PM, Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:

Signals controlled movements of freight cars, right? My need is for a Century Foundry HO dwarf signal kit. If anyone has one they can spare, name your price and I’ll pay shipping.

Tony Thompson 


On Feb 19, 2019, at 11:58 AM, Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:

I spent this morning—my 73rd Birthday—cutting into a perfectly fine model. Shortly after purchasing the Funaro & Camerlengo kit #8292 to model a Reading XAd autocar, I started looking for photos to support building the kit and found a photo at "Bob's" of RDG 18867. It interested me because the left door was a replacement 7-panel Superior door. As I built the kit a voice kept telling to build my model with that door but it was only when I was almost finished did I pull the trigger. As the first photo shows I drilled a series of holes inside the door frame and then used the drill as a router to completely cut the door free. Then I filed what was left up do the four sides of the door frame and then used the cut out area to begin getting a small slab of 0.040 sheet styrene to make a new door. Next step will be to sort out the location of the door ribs. I did mange to nick the frame in a few places with the drill bit I will repair these nicks with styrene. I have to admit I like personalizing or putting my own signature on the models I build.

Bill Welch
<New Reading Door I.JPG>
<New Reading Door II.JPG>
<New Reading Door III.JPG>


Re: Books and Magazines

Dave Boss
 

Hello Allen
                  I've been looking for some of those logging in Pa. books. I'm particularly interested in the volume or volumes on the logging operations in Warren,and Forest counties in Pa. The exact volume number escapes me but if you have one, I would be interested in it  Thank you Dave

Virus-free. www.avg.com

On Thu, Feb 21, 2019 at 12:45 PM Allen Montgomery via Groups.Io <sandbear75=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I'll send you an email tomorrow with more detail as I'm snowbound at home and doing this on my phone. 


On Thu, Feb 21, 2019 at 10:40 AM, Marty McGuirk
<mjmcguirk@...> wrote:

Allen, 


If no one else has expressed any interest, I'd be interested in the series on Pennsylvania and Maryland logging railroads. 


Marty McGuirk




On February 20, 2019 at 11:19 AM "Allen Montgomery via Groups.Io" <sandbear75=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

My father, James Montgomery, 81, has been a lifelong rail nut. Why do you think my infection is so bad? He has amassed 1000's of issues of every magazine about railroading, going back to 1912 as far as I've seen. He had a website buying and selling them, but those days are over. He is currently undergoing treatment for cancer and has decided to down size into a smaller home. So, my inheritance  consists of truck load after truck load of books and magazines, most of which I don't have room for. Maybe if I took down my home layout and put in floor to ceiling book shelves, I might have a chance. But who wants to do that? My extra bedroom is already the library and I'm trying to figure out how I can put another layout around the room over the book shelves.
So, I would like to judge just how much demand there is for what seems to me, to be some fairly rare stuff. At least from a west coasters perspective. I've decided to keep everything that pertains to western railroading until I can read through it and keep the best stuff. The rest is up for grabs.
Any of you easterners have a desire for a series on logging railroads of Pennsylvania and Maryland?


I have books 1, 5-9 on Pennsylvania and two copies of 'Tall Pines and Winding Rivers', about Maryland. All are in great condition. There's a ton of photos in them of turn of the century freight cars, so Mike, don't be too mad at me. Here's one that I've never seen before in the attachment below.
If any of you have been looking for an issue from some obscure magazine and haven't found it, let me know. I might come across it in one of these truck loads.
Allen Montgomery


 


 


Virus-free. www.avg.com


Re: Books and Magazines

Allen Montgomery
 

I'll send you an email tomorrow with more detail as I'm snowbound at home and doing this on my phone. 


On Thu, Feb 21, 2019 at 10:40 AM, Marty McGuirk
<mjmcguirk@...> wrote:

Allen, 


If no one else has expressed any interest, I'd be interested in the series on Pennsylvania and Maryland logging railroads. 


Marty McGuirk




On February 20, 2019 at 11:19 AM "Allen Montgomery via Groups.Io" <sandbear75@...> wrote:

My father, James Montgomery, 81, has been a lifelong rail nut. Why do you think my infection is so bad? He has amassed 1000's of issues of every magazine about railroading, going back to 1912 as far as I've seen. He had a website buying and selling them, but those days are over. He is currently undergoing treatment for cancer and has decided to down size into a smaller home. So, my inheritance  consists of truck load after truck load of books and magazines, most of which I don't have room for. Maybe if I took down my home layout and put in floor to ceiling book shelves, I might have a chance. But who wants to do that? My extra bedroom is already the library and I'm trying to figure out how I can put another layout around the room over the book shelves.
So, I would like to judge just how much demand there is for what seems to me, to be some fairly rare stuff. At least from a west coasters perspective. I've decided to keep everything that pertains to western railroading until I can read through it and keep the best stuff. The rest is up for grabs.
Any of you easterners have a desire for a series on logging railroads of Pennsylvania and Maryland?


I have books 1, 5-9 on Pennsylvania and two copies of 'Tall Pines and Winding Rivers', about Maryland. All are in great condition. There's a ton of photos in them of turn of the century freight cars, so Mike, don't be too mad at me. Here's one that I've never seen before in the attachment below.
If any of you have been looking for an issue from some obscure magazine and haven't found it, let me know. I might come across it in one of these truck loads.
Allen Montgomery


 


 


Re: Books and Magazines

Marty McGuirk
 

Allen, 


If no one else has expressed any interest, I'd be interested in the series on Pennsylvania and Maryland logging railroads. 


Marty McGuirk




On February 20, 2019 at 11:19 AM "Allen Montgomery via Groups.Io" <sandbear75@...> wrote:

My father, James Montgomery, 81, has been a lifelong rail nut. Why do you think my infection is so bad? He has amassed 1000's of issues of every magazine about railroading, going back to 1912 as far as I've seen. He had a website buying and selling them, but those days are over. He is currently undergoing treatment for cancer and has decided to down size into a smaller home. So, my inheritance  consists of truck load after truck load of books and magazines, most of which I don't have room for. Maybe if I took down my home layout and put in floor to ceiling book shelves, I might have a chance. But who wants to do that? My extra bedroom is already the library and I'm trying to figure out how I can put another layout around the room over the book shelves.
So, I would like to judge just how much demand there is for what seems to me, to be some fairly rare stuff. At least from a west coasters perspective. I've decided to keep everything that pertains to western railroading until I can read through it and keep the best stuff. The rest is up for grabs.
Any of you easterners have a desire for a series on logging railroads of Pennsylvania and Maryland?


I have books 1, 5-9 on Pennsylvania and two copies of 'Tall Pines and Winding Rivers', about Maryland. All are in great condition. There's a ton of photos in them of turn of the century freight cars, so Mike, don't be too mad at me. Here's one that I've never seen before in the attachment below.
If any of you have been looking for an issue from some obscure magazine and haven't found it, let me know. I might come across it in one of these truck loads.
Allen Montgomery


 


 


MDT 6000 Series Roof Question

Nelson Moyer
 

I’d like to build Sunshine 20.1 for the MDT 8000 series as MFT 6000 according to modifications described in PDS 20A, which states that the kit can be converted by using wood hatch covers and substituting vertical brake staff and horizontal brake wheel for steel hatch covers and URECO power hand brakes. I built the underbody, including the AB brake components according to the drawings in MM, April 2004 for the 6000 series car, then noticed that the roof for 6000 series cars has 11 flat panels, while the roof provided in the kit has 13 raised panels and an integrated steel hatch. OOOPS! The kit roof is wrong for the conversion, instructions notwithstanding, as it is the 13 raised panel roof. Does anyone know of a roof on any kit or RTR car that matches the 41 ft. 6 ¼ in. 11 flat panel roof of the 6000 series MDT reefers? If I can get the right roof, I can cast a duplicate for my car. I attached a cropped scan of the roof drawing to help identify the right roof. Note the configuration of the seam caps and hatch configuration. My kit included only two wood hatches, while there should have been four, so I have to cast two more hatches in addition to the roof.

 

Nelson Moyer


George Hook built the CV kits: Central Valley Rolling Stock Kits

Andy Carlson
 

George Hook was the founder of Central Valley Works, formed after WWll.  Located in North Hollywood for years selling mostly kits and die cast sprung HO trucks. Jack Parker, having left Mattel (Jack did a lot of development work for what was to become "Hotwheels"), purchased Central Valley in the early 1980s. Jack attempted to redesign the HO trucks and came out with I believe the first "Semi-
Scale" wheelsets in the market. There was some quality control issues with the first runs, and after an historical scathing from a Model railroader review, Jack discontinued all truck manufacturing. Jack devoted his time to tooling the Piru, California, SP through truss bridge, which became a huge hit. Jack was able to take his new wealth and move to a ideal spot for a Model Railroad Supply company, close to the coast, south of Pismo Beach, CA.

George Hook's freight car kits had long been dormant  before Jack's purchase of the line. He had zero interest in resurrecting the kits.

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

On Thursday, February 21, 2019, 8:44:29 AM PST, Bob Chaparro <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:


This was back in the time when Jack Parker owned the company and it was in Southern California. Jack moved the operation to Oceano, CA, and built a large Northern Pacific layout in the same building. His son, Jeff, took over after Jack passed and still produces various products. The layout is still operational.
Both the shop and the layout are open during the layout tour I organize each October for the Central Coast Railroad Festival (http://ccrrf.com/).
Here are a few photos.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: Throwback Thursday: Central Valley Rolling Stock Kits

Bob Chaparro
 

This was back in the time when Jack Parker owned the company and it was in Southern California. Jack moved the operation to Oceano, CA, and built a large Northern Pacific layout in the same building. His son, Jeff, took over after Jack passed and still produces various products. The layout is still operational.
Both the shop and the layout are open during the layout tour I organize each October for the Central Coast Railroad Festival (http://ccrrf.com/).
Here are a few photos.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: Design of Combination 40-Ton Stock and Coal Car

Charlie Vlk
 

Claus and all
The length decision was likely because stock chutes were largely set up for 36 foot cars.  The same thing was in play for meat reefers IIRC.
Charlie Vlk




On Thu, Feb 21, 2019 at 9:54 AM -0600, "Claus Schlund \(HGM\)" <claus@...> wrote:


Hi Bob and List Members,
 
Thanks Bob for pointing us all to this interesting link.
 
The drawings show what looks like a 36 ft inside length car - I'm surprised that this short length of car was still in fashion at this 'late' date of 1923! Forty foot cars had been the norm for quite some time by then.
 
Claus Schlund
 
 
 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, February 19, 2019 1:03 PM
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Design of Combination 40-Ton Stock and Coal Car

An article from the August 4, 1923, issue of Railway Review:

https://tinyurl.com/y6t9k3m8

Includes text, drawings and specifications.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Design of Combination 40-Ton Stock and Coal Car

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 


Hi Bob and List Members,
 
Thanks Bob for pointing us all to this interesting link.
 
The drawings show what looks like a 36 ft inside length car - I'm surprised that this short length of car was still in fashion at this 'late' date of 1923! Forty foot cars had been the norm for quite some time by then.
 
Claus Schlund
 
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, February 19, 2019 1:03 PM
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Design of Combination 40-Ton Stock and Coal Car

An article from the August 4, 1923, issue of Railway Review:

https://tinyurl.com/y6t9k3m8

Includes text, drawings and specifications.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Throwback Thursday: Central Valley Rolling Stock Kits

Benjamin Hom
 

Central Valley ad, January 1954 issue of Model Railroader.


Ben Hom


Re: Reading Diamon Scheme lettering

Brian Carlson
 

I have a photo of a repainted Speed lettering gon in 1956.

 

Brian J. Carlson, P.E.

Cheektowaga NY

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Fran Giacoma
Sent: Wednesday, February 20, 2019 5:50 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Reading Diamon Scheme lettering

 

Tim,
According to George Losse’s presentation at the March 23-25, 2012 Prototype Modelers Meet titled “Modeling Reading Company Open Hopper Cars 1948-1956”, 
the 86000-86699 class HTv hopper cars were delivered in “speed lettering” in 1955. 
Just used his presentation to “correct” my small fleet of Reading hopper cars.
Fran Giacoma


Re: Reading Diamon Scheme lettering

Fran Giacoma
 

Tim,
According to George Losse’s presentation at the March 23-25, 2012 Prototype Modelers Meet titled “Modeling Reading Company Open Hopper Cars 1948-1956”, 
the 86000-86699 class HTv hopper cars were delivered in “speed lettering” in 1955. 
Just used his presentation to “correct” my small fleet of Reading hopper cars.
Fran Giacoma


West Side-Journal bearing sizes

Andy Carlson
 

Nice story how the F&CC parts made it to West Side Lumber Co. and also repatriated back to Colorado.

After the F&CC RR was severly damaged from a storm in the earlier 20th Century, much of their rolling stock (like 3-4 locomotives, some flat cars, cabooses and AC&F box cars) made it to the Nevada, California and Oregon, a narrow gauge RR which ran in all three of its name states. By the end of the 1920s the Southern Pacific RR purchased the NC&O RR for the planned route to Klamath Falls in the Modoc cutoff project. SP quickly standard gauged the line.

Not all equipment made it to the SP's Owens Valley narrow gauge line, as the Pacific Coast Railway, the narrow gauge road out of California's mid coast area of San Luis Obispo, purchased the cabooses, 2 4-6-0s, some flats and box cars. Before WWll, the PCRy itself failed and the West Side Lumber company purchased trucks and draft gears from the newly parted out narrow gauge freight cars. Some of the F&CC hardware thus made into new WS skeleten log cars. After the West Side and Cherry Valley failed, the Georgetown loop purchased some WSLC flats, and if someone is to look at some of the tourist cars, you can see "F&CC" initials on some hardware. Travelled a bit more than "as the crow flies"!

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

On Wednesday, February 20, 2019, 12:03:58 PM PST, David Soderblom <drs@...> wrote:


Yes, West Side was 3-foot gauge.  They had a  few trucks that had started out on the Florence & Cripple Creek.

David Soderblom
Baltimore MD USA








Re: Journal bearing sizes

Charles Peck
 

Yes, the trucks are 3 foot gauge.  No collar on the end of the axle and the wedge has a thrust
bearing plate on it.  And those little boxes have to be jacked up just right to get parts in
and out.  Not very forgiving.  
Chuck Peck

On Wed, Feb 20, 2019 at 1:04 PM Randy Hees <randyhees@...> wrote:
Is this narrow gauge?  If so, the D&RG was using a non-MCB collarless axle (called a "Muley") on their standard freight truck.  This bearing has a face to bear on the end of the axle to control thrust.

If standard gauge, the original MCB bearing was 3 3/4 x 7...   This became the MCB A bearing when the B size  (4 1/2x8) was adopted in the mid 1880's, followed by the C (5x9) in the 1890's...

MCB bearings A are very hard to find...  B's and C's are out there... 

Randy Hees


Re: Journal bearing sizes

David Soderblom
 

Yes, West Side was 3-foot gauge. They had a few trucks that had started out on the Florence & Cripple Creek.

David Soderblom
Baltimore MD USA
drs@stsci.edu, 410-338-4543

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