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Re: Proctor & Gamble Tank Cars

Tony Thompson
 

I agree with Spen Kellogg (who should know) that the cargoes here were vegetable oil from the Caribbean, likely palm oil. Remember that Proctor & Gamble made a lot of soap.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Design of Combination 40-Ton Stock and Coal Car

Steve SANDIFER
 

Charlie is right, and this depends on the railroad and its area served. The Santa Fe switched to 40’ stock cars around 1900. Other railroads ran 36’ cars into the 1950s. It also appears that railroads which handled primarily cattle used a lot of 40’ while those that shipped a lot of hogs used more 36’. Most country stock pens only had one chute, so the 36’ or 40’ spacing did not matter. It was the larger union stock yards where chute spacing was of greater concern.

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Charlie Vlk
Sent: Thursday, February 21, 2019 10:29 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Design of Combination 40-Ton Stock and Coal Car

 

Claus and all

The length decision was likely because stock chutes were largely set up for 36 foot cars.  The same thing was in play for meat reefers IIRC.

Charlie Vlk



On Thu, Feb 21, 2019 at 9:54 AM -0600, "Claus Schlund \(HGM\)" <claus@...> wrote:



Hi Bob and List Members,

 

Thanks Bob for pointing us all to this interesting link.

 

The drawings show what looks like a 36 ft inside length car - I'm surprised that this short length of car was still in fashion at this 'late' date of 1923! Forty foot cars had been the norm for quite some time by then.

 

Claus Schlund

 

 

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Tuesday, February 19, 2019 1:03 PM

Subject: [RealSTMFC] Design of Combination 40-Ton Stock and Coal Car

 

An article from the August 4, 1923, issue of Railway Review:

https://tinyurl.com/y6t9k3m8

Includes text, drawings and specifications.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Heywood Oil Syndicate Tank Cars

Jim Ogden
 

Jennings Oil/ Heywood Oil/ Heywood Jennings Oil owned oil leases in and around Jennings and Acadia parish and had a refining agreement with Gulf. I doubt they had any tank cars of their own and probably made most of their income from buying and selling leases.


In the 1920s there were once all sorts of tracks that came off the T&NO and Gulf Coast Lines to small facilities out in the middle of rice or sugar cane fields. The tank cars probably were parked at a Heywood Oil lease outside of Jennings so the photographer probably probably just scribbled these were Heywood Oil Syndicate cars and the negative went in the box for 70 years.

Jim Ogden
Formerly of Louisiana


Re: MDT 6000 Series Roof Question

Nelson Moyer
 

Thanks, Tom. I’ll look into the SFRD Rr5-9 cars and see what I find. I don’t have any SFRD kits to do a direct comparison (except the new RCW kits). Maybe somebody out that built the Rr 5-9 with a steel roof would part with the wood roof?

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tom Madden via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, February 21, 2019 4:09 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] MDT 6000 Series Roof Question

 

I was under the impression that the Sunshine MDT/NRC wood reefers were from the same family as the Sunshine Santa Fe Rr 5-9, 11 wood reefers. The Santa Fe ones came with either a replacement panel steel roof or a "wood roof". The latter has 11 seam caps and hatch mounts.

Tom Madden


Re: MDT 6000 Series Roof Question

Nelson Moyer
 

Pierre doesn’t give the roof length but it’s probably for a 40 ft. box car. The 6000 series roof is 41 ft. 6 ¼ in. to make the two end panels long enough to accommodate the hatches (the car is 41 ft. 5 in. long; 42 ft. 9-7/8 in. long over the running boards). I don’t think the YMW Murphy flat panel roof will be long enough, besides, it lacks the flairs on the outside ends of the seam caps shown in the drawing, and the end panels are the same size as the others, leaving no room for the ice hatches. I need a better match.

Nelson Moyer

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of David via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, February 21, 2019 2:58 PM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] MDT 6000 Series Roof Question

The roof in question is the SRE Murphy Solidsteel roof of the 1920s. 11 seam caps, and ten panels (12 counting the end panels with the hatches).
Easiest starting point would be the Yarmouth "Murphy flat panel" roof:
http://www.yarmouthmodelworks.com/index.php/Products/4238R

David Thompson


Mailed both today: I have a single RTR Intermountain undec USRA Gondola

Andy Carlson
 

USPS Tracking # 9505 5148 6716 9052 3121 95

Thanks,
-Andy

On Monday, February 18, 2019, 9:22:20 AM PST, Dave Bayless <davebayl@...> wrote:


Hi Andy:

If this car is available, I will take it.

How much do you want me to send via PayPal?

Dave Bayless

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Andy Carlson
Sent: Sunday, February 17, 2019 4:57 PM
To: STMFC <main@realstmfc.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] I have a single RTR Intermountain undec USRA Gondola

 


Hi-

 

I have a new Intermountain undecorated factory assembled USRA gondola, IMRC #46697 offered for purchase.

 

IMRC list is $32, I am offering this car for $27, and I pay USPS 1st class mail to the US. I accept checks and money orders. With a small fee, I accept PayPal. If interested, I suggest contacting me off-list, please, at <midcentury@...>

 

This may be the only factory assembled undec freight car at Intermountain. This car is new and never has been removed from its packaging.

Thanks,

-Andy Carlson

Ojai CA


Re: Proctor & Gamble Tank Cars

Spen Kellogg <spninetynine@...>
 

On 2/21/2019 3:59 PM, Bill Keene via Groups.Io wrote:
Hi Bob,

I can not add much about the tank cars… others are more tank car
literate than I am… but can offer some info about the ship…

The photo must have been taken sometime in the 1930s and it appears to
be somewhere on the Mississippi River. More of a guessing game on this
data. Wonder if the contents are being loaded or unloaded from the
ship. Also what those contents might be.
The cars were carrying some kind of vegetable oil, most likely palm oil,
although coconut oil is also possible. Some of those tank cars (the ones
with the high running boards) were probably built in the first decade of
the 20th century. I would guess that they were 8,000 gallon MCB Class II
cars built around 1908 by ACF Milton. Note the early number on the
nearest one.

Spen Kellogg


Re: Proctor & Gamble Tank Cars

Bruce Smith
 

S.W.A.G. - Molasses is the cargo.

The cars are a range of types, mostly AC&F, with a few high walkway cars (AC&F type 7 ?)

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Dave Parker via Groups.Io <spottab@...>
Sent: Thursday, February 21, 2019 5:14 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Proctor & Gamble Tank Cars
 
The attached JPEG didn't have much resolution, so here is the link to the LDL:

http://louisianadigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/hnoc-clf%3A8480
louisianadigitallibrary.org
View of the steamship ""Max Albrecht"" docked at a wharf with railroad tank cars.



I little more detail is evident here, but it's still not easy to identify very many of the cars.  They all look to date to the late teens or early twenties, and are consistent with the PGX listings in my 1930 and 1935 ORERs.  The PGX listing is gone by 1940, and Ian Cranstones's database (http://www.nakina.net/other/report/reportp.html ) suggests that the reporting mark was briefly used by GATC before being phased out altogether.

Bill's data on the boat indeed narrows the window to the 1930s (aka the decade that almost nobody models).

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA


Re: Proctor & Gamble Tank Cars

Dave Parker
 

The attached JPEG didn't have much resolution, so here is the link to the LDL:

http://louisianadigitallibrary.org/islandora/object/hnoc-clf%3A8480

I little more detail is evident here, but it's still not easy to identify very many of the cars.  They all look to date to the late teens or early twenties, and are consistent with the PGX listings in my 1930 and 1935 ORERs.  The PGX listing is gone by 1940, and Ian Cranstones's database (http://www.nakina.net/other/report/reportp.html ) suggests that the reporting mark was briefly used by GATC before being phased out altogether.

Bill's data on the boat indeed narrows the window to the 1930s (aka the decade that almost nobody models).

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA


Re: Proctor & Gamble Tank Cars

Bill Keene
 

Hi Bob,

I can not add much about the tank cars… others are more tank car literate than I am… but can offer some info about the ship…

The photo must have been taken sometime in the 1930s and it appears to be somewhere on the Mississippi River. More of a guessing game on this data. Wonder if the contents are being loaded or unloaded from the ship. Also what those contents might be. 

Can add the following about the ship…

5,824 grt tanker built by Kockums Mekaniska Verksted, Malmö, Sweden. Completed in 1929 as MAX ALBRECHT for Max Albrecht Kommanditgesellschaft, Hamburg. On 30 August 1939 she sailed from Houston, Texas and put into El Ferrol, Spain where she was interned. Surrendered in May 1945 to the British Ministry of War Transport (MoWT) and renamed EMPIRE TAGRALIA. Sold 1947 to Basra Steam Shipping Co Ltd, London and renamed REPTON. Sold in 1952 to Lloyd Siciliano di Armamento SpA, Palermo, Italy and renamed ALCANTARA. Scrapped in September 1960 at Vado Ligure, Italy.


Description:
Builder:Kockums Mekaniska Verksted, Malmö, Sweden 
Year Of build: 1929 (Yard no 158) 
Owner: Dr. Max Albrecht Kommanditgesellschaft, Hamburg, Germany (Deutsches Reich) 
Measures: BRT 5824, LOA 122,53 m, breadth 16,76 m, draught 7,93 m, 11,5 kn 
History: 
MAX ALBRECHT (1929 - 1945) 
EMPIRE TAGRALIA (1945 - 1947) 
Owner: British Government, Operator Ministry of War Transport, London, U.K. 
REPTON (1947 - 1952) 
Owner: Basra Steam Shipping Co Ltd, London, U.K. 
ALCANTARA (1952 - 1960) 
Owner: Lloyd Siciliano di Armamento SpA, Palermo, Italy 
BU 1960 Lloyd Siciliano di Armamento SpA, Palermo, Italy 

An interesting scene for a seaport based layout. 

Cheers,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA

On Feb 21, 2019, at 2:39 PM, Bob Chaparro <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

Proctor & Gamble Tank Cars
This photo is from the Louisiana Digital Library.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA

<P_G_Tank_Cars.jpg>


Re: Heywood Oil Syndicate Tank Cars

Bob Chaparro
 

Probably a Library caption error.


Re: Heywood Oil Syndicate Tank Cars

Tim O'Connor
 

Bob

I dunno what "Heywood" is, but I can see the Southern Pacific lettering on the cars. They look
like SP CS-25A tank cars.

Tim O'Connor


On 2/21/2019 5:38 PM, Bob Chaparro wrote:

This photo is from the Louisiana Digital Library.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Attachments:

_._,_


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Signaling item

Tony Thompson
 

Larry Smith wrote:

Just got a message from showcase minatures.  They are in stock and are kept in stock.  Call them and they will ship asap.

   Thank you, Larry, good to know for that whole range.         Tony


Re: Books and Magazines

anthony wagner
 

A looong time ago RR Museum of Pennsylvania at Strasburg used to sell them. Haven't been there in a decade and a half. Tony Wagner

On Thursday, February 21, 2019, 4:16:15 PM CST, Hugh Guillaume via Groups.Io <mguill1224@...> wrote:


The books in that series by Tom Taber and by Ben Kline have been reprinted at least once but remain difficult to find.  The books by Walt Casler have not been reprinted and probably never will be reprinted.  There is also an Index volume for the series.  It is almost impossible to find.  I am lucky to have the entire series including the index.


Proctor & Gamble Tank Cars

Bob Chaparro
 

Proctor & Gamble Tank Cars

This photo is from the Louisiana Digital Library.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA



Heywood Oil Syndicate Tank Cars

Bob Chaparro
 

This photo is from the Louisiana Digital Library.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA



Re: Books and Magazines

 

The books in that series by Tom Taber and by Ben Kline have been reprinted at least once but remain difficult to find.  The books by Walt Casler have not been reprinted and probably never will be reprinted.  There is also an Index volume for the series.  It is almost impossible to find.  I am lucky to have the entire series including the index.


Re: MDT 6000 Series Roof Question

Tom Madden
 

I was under the impression that the Sunshine MDT/NRC wood reefers were from the same family as the Sunshine Santa Fe Rr 5-9, 11 wood reefers. The Santa Fe ones came with either a replacement panel steel roof or a "wood roof". The latter has 11 seam caps and hatch mounts.

Tom Madden


Cutting Into a Perfectly Fine Model Part 2

Bill Welch
 

More READING Door Replacement: As I noted earlier I nicked the door frame when I was cutting the old door away so this morning I repaired it using short sections of 0.030 styrene rod, first tacked into place w/Testors and then bonded in place with my reliable "Duro" Cyanoacrylate. I let this cure for a couple of hours and then trimmed and filed until it was impossible to tell I had ever messed up. While it was curing I added .020 x .030 strip styrene to my door blank, using a High School drafting technique taught to me by my friend Pierre Oliver to sort out the correct spacing. Here I used Tamiya's Super Thin as it sets up quickly and after about 30 minutes trimmed the ends off and made the wire door handle. I think it looks pretty good when set in place. I am very pleased with how this has turned out. I will wait to secure the door permanently until I do the other side because I need it to serve as a cutting guide for the second door. There are a couple gaps—I will use slivers of 0.005 styrene to fill these and melt it with Testors.

Bill Welch


MDT 6000 Series Roof Question

David
 

The roof in question is the SRE Murphy Solidsteel roof of the 1920s. 11 seam caps, and ten panels (12 counting the end panels with the hatches). Easiest starting point would be the Yarmouth "Murphy flat panel" roof: http://www.yarmouthmodelworks.com/index.php/Products/4238R

David Thompson

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