Date   

freight cars being scrapped in 1947

David
 

Would anyone have a guess what this car was? The other cars are Pere Marquette USRA ds box derivatives, but this one is Santa Fe?

https://www.facebook.com/Radio.WW2/photos/a.1995435020702484/1995435100702476/?type=3&;theater

David Thompson


Re: Procter & Gamble and Colgate-Palmolive

Tony Thompson
 

Andy Carlson wrote:

Though Palmolive may have been named for Palm oil and Olive oil combos, it was never a Procter and Gamble product. Back in nthe 1920s, the Palmolive corporation was founded. Later merged with the colgate company. Not associated at all with P&G.

       Palmolive originally was a product of the B.J. Johnson Company, and their primary product, a very popular soap, was given the Palmolive name for its ingredients, back in 1898. In 1928, Palmolive, already merged with Peets Brothers to form Palmolive-Peets, PUIRCHASED Colgate to form Colgate-Palmolive-Peet. The "Peet" was dropped in 1953, and today the company is still named Colgate-Palmolive.
       Certainly it's true that this is a separate topic from Procter & Gamble, who was the main competitor of Colgate-Palmolive and in fact usually outsold them in the soap business.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Procter & Gamble and Colgate-Palmolive

Andy Carlson
 

One more correction for the week----

Though Palmolive may have been named for Palm oil and Olive oil combos, it was never a Procter and Gamble product. Back in nthe 1920s, the Palmolive corporation was founded. Later merged with the colgate company. Not associated at all with P&G.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

On 2/22/2019 1:15 PM, Aley, Jeff A wrote:
> Indeed, P&G made a lot of soap.  As you know, soaps can be made with many different kinds of oil - coconut, palm, etc.
> One of their products was a soap made with a mixture of PALM oil and OLIVE oil -- PALMOLIVE.

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-


Re: freight cars being scrapped in 1947

Tony Thompson
 

Bruce Smith wrote:

In most cases, I believe that wooden cars were rolled to the side, off the track, before burning. This allowed the trucks, wheels, brakes etc.,, to be salvaged first and without damage from the flames and would have also spared the cross-ties.

    Metallurgically, the fire would only have annealed the cast steel and iron parts, not even a bad thing in most cases.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: Proctor & Gamble Tank Cars

Tim O'Connor
 

That's a great image Jeff I wish I could find a higher resolution view... there are lots of images
online but I can't find a better one of that facility. Here's another P&G building in St Louis.

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5267/5646992577_680913d9be_b.jpg

Tim O'

On 2/22/2019 1:15 PM, Aley, Jeff A wrote:
Indeed, P&G made a lot of soap. As you know, soaps can be made with many different kinds of oil - coconut, palm, etc.
One of their products was a soap made with a mixture of PALM oil and OLIVE oil -- PALMOLIVE.

Attached is an aerial photo of the P&G factory in Kansas City, KS. You can see many tank cars were present (though none are identifiable from this altitude).

Regards,

-Jeff

Armourdale04.jpg: https://RealSTMFC.groups.io/g/main/attachment/162355/0
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Re: freight cars being scrapped in 1947

dale florence <dwwesley@...>
 

At the H-M plant, you could see the crane derricks from the street. They were located where they burned the cars. No EPA then. I know they would stack cars, and assumed they knocked cars over.
The plant was located on the Illinois/Indiana boarder. Plant was all in Illinois.The burning took place near the boarder.




On Friday, February 22, 2019, 2:37:37 PM EST, Charles Peck <lnnrr152@...> wrote:


Yes, I agree that I would roll cars over onto their side if I had an interest in salvaging useful material, trucks and such.
Perhaps that was not the case in what I saw as I remember seeing a door fall off the car.  It made a big splash of embers
that really stood out in this boy's memory.
Chuck Peck

On Fri, Feb 22, 2019 at 11:42 AM Bruce Smith <smithbf@...> wrote:
Charles,

In most cases, I believe that wooden cars were rolled to the side, off the track, before burning. This allowed the trucks, wheels, brakes etc.,, to be salvaged first and without damage from the flames and would have also spared the cross-ties.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."




 




Re: freight cars being scrapped in 1947

Charles Peck
 

Yes, I agree that I would roll cars over onto their side if I had an interest in salvaging useful material, trucks and such.
Perhaps that was not the case in what I saw as I remember seeing a door fall off the car.  It made a big splash of embers
that really stood out in this boy's memory.
Chuck Peck

On Fri, Feb 22, 2019 at 11:42 AM Bruce Smith <smithbf@...> wrote:
Charles,

In most cases, I believe that wooden cars were rolled to the side, off the track, before burning. This allowed the trucks, wheels, brakes etc.,, to be salvaged first and without damage from the flames and would have also spared the cross-ties.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."




 




Re: George Hook built the CV kits: Central Valley Rolling Stock Kits

Bob Chaparro
 

Right, Andy. I should have remembered George's role in the company.
I asked Jack's son, Jeff, about the old kits. He has some on display at the current company location. Jeff says he has nothing on these...no plans, no tooling. So we are unlikely to see these kits again.


Re: Proctor & Gamble Tank Cars

mopacfirst
 

If this photo is New Orleans, then the ship is facing upriver since the docks were mostly along the city side.  The angle of the sun reinforces that thought.

That makes it more likely that this is an unloading scene.

Ron Merrick


Re: Proctor & Gamble Tank Cars

Aley, Jeff A
 

Indeed, P&G made a lot of soap. As you know, soaps can be made with many different kinds of oil - coconut, palm, etc.
One of their products was a soap made with a mixture of PALM oil and OLIVE oil -- PALMOLIVE.

Attached is an aerial photo of the P&G factory in Kansas City, KS. You can see many tank cars were present (though none are identifiable from this altitude).

Regards,

-Jeff

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tony Thompson
Sent: Thursday, February 21, 2019 6:27 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Proctor & Gamble Tank Cars

I agree with Spen Kellogg (who should know) that the cargoes here were vegetable oil from the Caribbean, likely palm oil. Remember that Proctor & Gamble made a lot of soap.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@signaturepress.com Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: freight cars being scrapped in 1947

Bruce Smith
 

Charles,

In most cases, I believe that wooden cars were rolled to the side, off the track, before burning. This allowed the trucks, wheels, brakes etc.,, to be salvaged first and without damage from the flames and would have also spared the cross-ties.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."




On Feb 22, 2019, at 10:05 AM, Charles Peck <lnnrr152@...> wrote:

In the late 1940's, grandfather would sometimes drive us down after dark to watch the L&N RR burning
wooden cars.  I remember there being five or six in a row but that there was at least one more row
behind.  Getting trucks and couplers out of the ashes would I guess have been straight forward.
The little stuff would get pulled out with the magnet crane.  Then bring in more cars once the
tracks were cleared.  
I have wondered what was done to protect the ties under the rails from burning.  Cover them
with something?  Flood them?  I don't know.  But it was quite a sight to see the flames at night
with sparks rising into the air. 
Chuck Peck

On Fri, Feb 22, 2019 at 9:51 AM Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

A collection of photos here - lots of interesting freight car bits and
pieces

https://www.facebook.com/pg/Radio.WW2/photos/?tab=album&album_id=1995435020702484

Tim O'Connor



--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*





Re: Proctor & Gamble Tank Cars

Peter Weiglin
 

Fellas, I almost hate to bringt his up, but -

In case someone is doing decal artwork or car cards, it should be noted that the name of the company is PROCTER and Gamble.
Company was founded in 1837 by William Procter and James Gamble.

Proctor is a town near Duluth, or someone who oversees exams

Peter Weiglin


Re: freight cars being scrapped in 1947

dale florence <dwwesley@...>
 

I lived not to far from these photos, and they did burn cars. I remember the clouds of smoke coming from near the back end of there property. I still have memories of the Green Bay Western gray wood refer cars lined up for scrapping.

Dale Florence




On Friday, February 22, 2019, 10:18:32 AM EST, tyesac@... via Groups.Io <tyesac@...> wrote:


Tim,

Nice find!   There's a lot of photos of Santa Fe Caswell gons being cut up.  It's interesting that they have had the wood striped out and are being cut up upside down. Striping the wood out first is obviously done to prevent burning.  In one of the photos the one underframe appears to have been from a Caswell stock/coke car.

Tom Casey    


-----Original Message-----
From: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Feb 22, 2019 8:51 am
Subject: [RealSTMFC] freight cars being scrapped in 1947


A collection of photos here - lots of interesting freight car bits and
pieces


Tim O'Connor



--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*




Re: freight cars being scrapped in 1947

Charles Peck
 

In the late 1940's, grandfather would sometimes drive us down after dark to watch the L&N RR burning
wooden cars.  I remember there being five or six in a row but that there was at least one more row
behind.  Getting trucks and couplers out of the ashes would I guess have been straight forward.
The little stuff would get pulled out with the magnet crane.  Then bring in more cars once the
tracks were cleared.  
I have wondered what was done to protect the ties under the rails from burning.  Cover them
with something?  Flood them?  I don't know.  But it was quite a sight to see the flames at night
with sparks rising into the air. 
Chuck Peck

On Fri, Feb 22, 2019 at 9:51 AM Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

A collection of photos here - lots of interesting freight car bits and
pieces

https://www.facebook.com/pg/Radio.WW2/photos/?tab=album&album_id=1995435020702484

Tim O'Connor



--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*




Re: freight cars being scrapped in 1947

tyesac@aol.com <tyesac@...>
 

Tim,

Nice find!   There's a lot of photos of Santa Fe Caswell gons being cut up.  It's interesting that they have had the wood striped out and are being cut up upside down. Striping the wood out first is obviously done to prevent burning.  In one of the photos the one underframe appears to have been from a Caswell stock/coke car.

Tom Casey    


-----Original Message-----
From: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Feb 22, 2019 8:51 am
Subject: [RealSTMFC] freight cars being scrapped in 1947


A collection of photos here - lots of interesting freight car bits and
pieces


Tim O'Connor



--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*




Re: freight cars being scrapped in 1947

Paul Doggett
 

Some great photos there Tim.

Paul Doggett England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿

On 22 Feb 2019, at 14:51, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@comcast.net> wrote:


A collection of photos here - lots of interesting freight car bits and pieces

https://www.facebook.com/pg/Radio.WW2/photos/?tab=album&;album_id=1995435020702484

Tim O'Connor



--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*



freight cars being scrapped in 1947

Tim O'Connor
 

A collection of photos here - lots of interesting freight car bits and pieces

https://www.facebook.com/pg/Radio.WW2/photos/?tab=album&;album_id=1995435020702484

Tim O'Connor



--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Re: MDT 6000 Series Roof Question

tyesac@aol.com <tyesac@...>
 

Nelson,

The way the Sunshine kits were packaged, they would contain only the one roof per kit, so there would be no second roof to trade.

Tom Casey 
Nelson Moyer (npmoyer@...)To:you (Bcc) + 1 more Details

Nelson Moyer npmoyer@...Hide
To main@RealSTMFC.groups.io main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
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Thanks, Tom. I’ll look into the SFRD Rr5-9 cars and see what I find. I don’t have any SFRD kits to do a direct comparison (except the new RCW kits). Maybe somebody out that built the Rr 5-9 with a steel roof would part with the wood roof?
 
Nelson Moyer
 
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tom Madden via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, February 21, 2019 4:09 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] MDT 6000 Series Roof Question
 
I was under the impression that the Sunshine MDT/NRC wood reefers were from the same family as the Sunshine Santa Fe Rr 5-9, 11 wood reefers. The Santa Fe ones came with either a replacement panel steel roof or a "wood roof". The latter has 11 seam caps and hatch mounts.

Tom Madden



-----Original Message-----
From: Nelson Moyer <npmoyer@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Thu, Feb 21, 2019 7:18 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] MDT 6000 Series Roof Question

Thanks, Tom. I’ll look into the SFRD Rr5-9 cars and see what I find. I don’t have any SFRD kits to do a direct comparison (except the new RCW kits). Maybe somebody out that built the Rr 5-9 with a steel roof would part with the wood roof?
 
Nelson Moyer
 
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tom Madden via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, February 21, 2019 4:09 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] MDT 6000 Series Roof Question
 
I was under the impression that the Sunshine MDT/NRC wood reefers were from the same family as the Sunshine Santa Fe Rr 5-9, 11 wood reefers. The Santa Fe ones came with either a replacement panel steel roof or a "wood roof". The latter has 11 seam caps and hatch mounts.

Tom Madden


Re: Proctor & Gamble Tank Cars

Tony Thompson
 

I agree with Spen Kellogg (who should know) that the cargoes here were vegetable oil from the Caribbean, likely palm oil. Remember that Proctor & Gamble made a lot of soap.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Design of Combination 40-Ton Stock and Coal Car

Steve SANDIFER
 

Charlie is right, and this depends on the railroad and its area served. The Santa Fe switched to 40’ stock cars around 1900. Other railroads ran 36’ cars into the 1950s. It also appears that railroads which handled primarily cattle used a lot of 40’ while those that shipped a lot of hogs used more 36’. Most country stock pens only had one chute, so the 36’ or 40’ spacing did not matter. It was the larger union stock yards where chute spacing was of greater concern.

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Charlie Vlk
Sent: Thursday, February 21, 2019 10:29 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Design of Combination 40-Ton Stock and Coal Car

 

Claus and all

The length decision was likely because stock chutes were largely set up for 36 foot cars.  The same thing was in play for meat reefers IIRC.

Charlie Vlk



On Thu, Feb 21, 2019 at 9:54 AM -0600, "Claus Schlund \(HGM\)" <claus@...> wrote:



Hi Bob and List Members,

 

Thanks Bob for pointing us all to this interesting link.

 

The drawings show what looks like a 36 ft inside length car - I'm surprised that this short length of car was still in fashion at this 'late' date of 1923! Forty foot cars had been the norm for quite some time by then.

 

Claus Schlund

 

 

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Tuesday, February 19, 2019 1:03 PM

Subject: [RealSTMFC] Design of Combination 40-Ton Stock and Coal Car

 

An article from the August 4, 1923, issue of Railway Review:

https://tinyurl.com/y6t9k3m8

Includes text, drawings and specifications.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

19821 - 19840 of 182166