Date   

Re: NKP Consist

Gary Roe
 

Brian,

I am curious as to why the 4 Erie cars near the rear of the train were shown as "A" cars.  I looked them up in the ORER, and they are box cars.  Other box cars are shown as "B" cars.

I saw no Flat cars in the consist, and only 1 Gondola.  Very interesting info!

gary roe
quincy, illinois




On ‎Monday‎, ‎March‎ ‎11‎, ‎2019‎ ‎11‎:‎55‎:‎38‎ ‎AM‎ ‎CDT, Brian Carlson via Groups.Io <prrk41361@...> wrote:


While going thru some NKP docs I found the attached NKP consist from 1957. A lot of meat as expected. Routings are shown too. All sort of neat stuff, including dog food in reefers. May the discussion commence. 

Brian J Carlson, P.E.
Cheektowaga NY 14227


Re: Unidentified deep well flatcar

 

That’s right; I was wrong about Newport News. 

Thanks!
Brian Ehni 
(Sent from my iPhone)

On Mar 11, 2019, at 12:36 PM, Jack Mullen <jack.f.mullen@...> wrote:

CISX 500, a 250 ton car owned by Carnegie-Illinois Steel Co. And yes, that's Jumbo.
We discussed this a few years back. Check the archives.
Jack Mullen


Re: steam era freight car images, dating from 1900 to 1942

Benjamin Hom
 

George Irwin asked:
"Question with respect to the lineup of boxcars: Any thoughts on what the letters inside the diamond represented?  There is at least "U" and "K" plus a "J" on the "C.C.R.R." boxcar."

My guess is those indicate cars assigned to freight forwarding lines.  Other examples include the diamond "S" used on the NYC&HR, and the folowing used on the PRR: Empire Line (arrow in rectangle), Union Line (circle and star), Anchor Line (anchor), Great Southern Despatch (intertwined "GSD").


Ben Hom


Re: Unidentified deep well flatcar

 

Last summer I bought a book at White Sands N.M. about the Manhattan Project.  The story of transporting Jumbo is well-documented in that book.  Book is at home, I am in FL, so I can't provide title.  I also bought am excellent book there about Oppenheimer.  H.T. Guillaume


Re: steam era freight car images, dating from 1900 to 1942

Jack Mullen
 

On Mon, Mar 11, 2019 at 08:30 AM, Claus Schlund \(HGM\) wrote:
the locomotives all positioned with the front facing toward the turntable. We mostly see these views with the front of the locomotive facing AWAY from the turntable... I wonder if this was normal practice or was done for the benefit of the photograph.
The roundhouse smoke vents are at the end of the roof toward the turntable, so facing the locos this way is normal practice here, and the house is designed accordingly.  I've seen either orientation in various photos of this vintage or earlier, and it seems like facing the other way became nearly universal by around the turn of the century. Legible weigh dates are 1883-85, so this is likely an 1885 photo.
So since our "steam era" is defined as 1900-1960, do we call these pre-steam era freight cars? Nah. How about ancestral steam-era cars?
I must be conditioned by 20th c. practices. That horizontal sheathing on DS cars just doesn't look right.  ;^)

Jack Mullen


steam era freight car images, dating from 1900 to 1942

Andy Carlson
 

My own railroad of interest built its Roundhouse in the 1880s. At first, the locomotives were parked front-facing towards the turntable. Later, the RY expanded the Roundhouse and relocated the vent clearstory to allow parking the engines inward for the same reason Bill mentions. Perhaps there were reasons for the earlier parking directions which eventually changed by the later, transitional era.
-Andy

On Monday, March 11, 2019, 10:59:24 AM PDT, Bill Daniels via Groups.Io <billinsf@...> wrote:


Claus,
I was going to say it was done for the photo. Locomotives were usually faced inwards in roundhouses so to allow maintainers free access to the front end. However, that may not be the case here since the roundhouse is in the background in this photo.

Bill Daniels 


_._,_._,_


Re: steam era freight car images, dating from 1900 to 1942

Bill Daniels <billinsf@...>
 

Claus,
I was going to say it was done for the photo. Locomotives were usually faced inwards in roundhouses so to allow maintainers free access to the front end. However, that may not be the case here since the roundhouse is in the background in this photo.

Bill Daniels 


On Mar 11, 2019, at 10:50 AM, G.J. Irwin <groups@...> wrote:

On Mon, Mar 11, 2019 at 08:30 AM, Claus Schlund \(HGM\) wrote:
https://digitalcollections.uwyo.edu/luna/servlet/s/1xy326
Question with respect to the lineup of boxcars: Any thoughts on what the letters inside the diamond represented?  There is at least "U" and "K" plus a "J" on the "C.C.R.R." boxcar.

George Irwin


Re: steam era freight car images, dating from 1900 to 1942

G.J. Irwin
 

On Mon, Mar 11, 2019 at 08:30 AM, Claus Schlund \(HGM\) wrote:
https://digitalcollections.uwyo.edu/luna/servlet/s/1xy326
Question with respect to the lineup of boxcars: Any thoughts on what the letters inside the diamond represented?  There is at least "U" and "K" plus a "J" on the "C.C.R.R." boxcar.

George Irwin


Re: Unidentified deep well flatcar

Bill Daniels <billinsf@...>
 

No, Tim. It’s not a reactor vessel. I’ve seen a lot of RV’s over the years and this is not one.

Bill Daniels


On Mar 11, 2019, at 7:54 AM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


I think this is a photo from Hannaford, Washington, and not from Los Alamos.

It's probably a reactor vessel of some kind.



On 3/11/2019 8:17 AM, Donald B. Valentine via Groups.Io wrote:
Hi folks,

   Does anyone have any idea of what railroad owned the deep well flatcar in the photo attached
that the first A-bomb was being unloaded from in the desert? This is from recently released CIA
documents. Then, too, it could have been government owned. Presume such things are still
shipped in a similar manner. Just as long as they are not armed!

Cordially, Don Valentine

  





--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Unidentified deep well flatcar

Jack Mullen
 

CISX 500, a 250 ton car owned by Carnegie-Illinois Steel Co. And yes, that's Jumbo.
We discussed this a few years back. Check the archives.
Jack Mullen


NKP Consist

Brian Carlson
 

While going thru some NKP docs I found the attached NKP consist from 1957. A lot of meat as expected. Routings are shown too. All sort of neat stuff, including dog food in reefers. May the discussion commence. 

Brian J Carlson, P.E.
Cheektowaga NY 14227


Re: Unidentified deep well flatcar

 

They were going to explode the gadget inside that so if it were a dud, they could recover the hideously valuable plutonium. 

Thanks!
Brian Ehni 
(Sent from my iPhone)

On Mar 11, 2019, at 8:22 AM, Daniel A. Mitchell <danmitch@...> wrote:

Whatever it is, it’s NOT “the gadget”, the first A-bomb. It’s too large, and altogether the wrong shape. It looks like a pressure vessel, possibly a reactor containment vessel. "The Gadget” was assembled at Los Alamos, and detonated nearby. There are photos of it being hauled around by truck. The shell of it may have been shipped in by rail, but THIS is not that. There’s not much point in putting a pressure vessel around an A-bomb. Does it say WHERE the photo was taken. Hanford, WA, maybe?

As for nuclear bombs, they have to be moved "somehow”. Nobody but the government knows for sure. For years it’s been assumed the infamous “DOD white train” is used for this … nowadays mostly hauling ICBMs and warheads about. There are a lot fewer of them today than at the peak of the cold war. The missiles are also much smaller. 

Dan Mitchell
==========
On Mar 11, 2019, at 8:17 AM, Donald B. Valentine via Groups.Io <riverman_vt@...> wrote:

Hi folks,

   Does anyone have any idea of what railroad owned the deep well flatcar in the photo attached
that the first A-bomb was being unloaded from in the desert? This is from recently released CIA
documents. Then, too, it could have been government owned. Presume such things are still
shipped in a similar manner. Just as long as they are not armed!

Cordially, Don Valentine

  





Re: Unidentified deep well flatcar

 

IIRC Newport News. 

Thanks!
Brian Ehni 
(Sent from my iPhone)

On Mar 11, 2019, at 7:17 AM, Donald B. Valentine via Groups.Io <riverman_vt@...> wrote:

Hi folks,

   Does anyone have any idea of what railroad owned the deep well flatcar in the photo attached
that the first A-bomb was being unloaded from in the desert? This is from recently released CIA
documents. Then, too, it could have been government owned. Presume such things are still
shipped in a similar manner. Just as long as they are not armed!

Cordially, Don Valentine

  




Re: Unidentified deep well flatcar

Stic Harris
 

Some more information and pictures (including a steam era freight car).  : )


On Mon, Mar 11, 2019 at 12:18 PM John Moore via Groups.Io <okladivjohn=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

The photo was taken at Pope, New Mexico, during the unloading of Jumbo.  Pope is on the Santa Fe line from Albuquerque to El Paso. 
okladivjohn@...



--


- Stic


Re: Unidentified deep well flatcar

John Moore
 


The photo was taken at Pope, New Mexico, during the unloading of Jumbo.  Pope is on the Santa Fe line from Albuquerque to El Paso. 
okladivjohn@...


Re: steam era freight car images, dating from 1900 to 1942

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 


Hi Craig and List Members,
 
Craig, you are refering to this image I believe...
 
 
I like the fact that one can zoom in a whole lot for some very nice detail viewing.
 
Note in the above image the roundhouse, with the locomotives all positioned with the front facing toward the turntable. We mostly see these views with the front of the locomotive facing AWAY from the turntable... I wonder if this was normal practice or was done for the benefit of the photograph.
 
Claus Schlund
 
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, March 11, 2019 9:12 AM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] steam era freight car images, dating from 1900 to 1942

Claus, Thanks in particular for the photo of the string of 28' UP Boxcars. This is very helpful to me!

Craig Bisgeier


Re: Unidentified deep well flatcar

Paul Doggett
 

First A bomb 
Paul Doggett    England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 



On 11 Mar 2019, at 14:54, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


I think this is a photo from Hannaford, Washington, and not from Los Alamos.

It's probably a reactor vessel of some kind.



On 3/11/2019 8:17 AM, Donald B. Valentine via Groups.Io wrote:
Hi folks,

   Does anyone have any idea of what railroad owned the deep well flatcar in the photo attached
that the first A-bomb was being unloaded from in the desert? This is from recently released CIA
documents. Then, too, it could have been government owned. Presume such things are still
shipped in a similar manner. Just as long as they are not armed!

Cordially, Don Valentine

  





--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Station reports (was UP 175288 in 1938 - emigrants)

Earl Tuson
 

Tony responded to Tim:

> I haven't got a clue what that could possibly mean, but I'm more curious about the document itself...

The monthly station report was commonplace, Tim. Instruction books for station agents include them,
and so does the _AAR Accounting Rules_ book.

Here’s a sample CT100 from the Suncook Valley Railroad:

http://suncookvalleyrailroad.redmansefarm.com/FreightDocs/SVFormCT100.jpg

Too bad I don’t have a stack of them filled out!

Earl Tuson


Re: Unidentified deep well flatcar

Tim O'Connor
 


I think this is a photo from Hannaford, Washington, and not from Los Alamos.

It's probably a reactor vessel of some kind.



On 3/11/2019 8:17 AM, Donald B. Valentine via Groups.Io wrote:
Hi folks,

   Does anyone have any idea of what railroad owned the deep well flatcar in the photo attached
that the first A-bomb was being unloaded from in the desert? This is from recently released CIA
documents. Then, too, it could have been government owned. Presume such things are still
shipped in a similar manner. Just as long as they are not armed!

Cordially, Don Valentine

  





--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Unidentified deep well flatcar

Daniel A. Mitchell
 

Makes sense. It’s not the gadget, and there’s no containing the actual nuclear explosion IF it occurs].

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Mar 11, 2019, at 9:44 AM, Jeff <jeffshultz@...> wrote:

That's Jumbo, a large metal casing (214 tons) that was designed to hold the Gadget. The idea was that if the TNT exploded but the plutonium didn't, it would contain the explosion and no plutonium would be lost.

They didn't use it, but it survived intact 800 yards from the detonation. They later blew the ends off with eight 500lb bombs. I've been to Trinity, it is still there.


On Mon, Mar 11, 2019, 06:22 Daniel A. Mitchell <danmitch@...> wrote:
Whatever it is, it’s NOT “the gadget”, the first A-bomb. It’s too large, and altogether the wrong shape. It looks like a pressure vessel, possibly a reactor containment vessel. "The Gadget” was assembled at Los Alamos, and detonated nearby. There are photos of it being hauled around by truck. The shell of it may have been shipped in by rail, but THIS is not that. There’s not much point in putting a pressure vessel around an A-bomb. Does it say WHERE the photo was taken. Hanford, WA, maybe?

As for nuclear bombs, they have to be moved "somehow”. Nobody but the government knows for sure. For years it’s been assumed the infamous “DOD white train” is used for this … nowadays mostly hauling ICBMs and warheads about. There are a lot fewer of them today than at the peak of the cold war. The missiles are also much smaller. 

Dan Mitchell
==========
On Mar 11, 2019, at 8:17 AM, Donald B. Valentine via Groups.Io <riverman_vt@...> wrote:

Hi folks,

   Does anyone have any idea of what railroad owned the deep well flatcar in the photo attached
that the first A-bomb was being unloaded from in the desert? This is from recently released CIA
documents. Then, too, it could have been government owned. Presume such things are still
shipped in a similar manner. Just as long as they are not armed!

Cordially, Don Valentine

  







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