Date   

Re: modeling a crane question

Doug Forbes
 

Hey Garth,
Thanks for the idea of that crane.  I hadn't noticed that kit before.  My current plan is to first try and draw on paper a two-dimensional scale sketch using the dimensions in the article and some photos.  From there I will try and find a base to use, maybe the one you suggested.  The boom I think I will try and 3D print using Shapeways, and the cab either kitbash or 3D print.  Should be interesting.  Thanks all for the tips and advice. 


Re: Private Name SS Box Car 1536

Paul Doggett
 

Lester 

That’s a fine job,

Paul Doggett.  England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 


On 14 Mar 2019, at 12:56, Lester Breuer <rforailroad@...> wrote:

Hello Tom,

Thank You for the kind words.

Now, the ladder rungs.  After the molded rungs are removed I drill number #80 or #79 holes along each stile at the rung fastener location.  Next, I do touch up painting.   Once touch up paint was dry I added straight grab irons for the ladder rungs bent from Tichy Train Group (Tichy) #1101, .010” diameter phosphor bronze wire (PBW).  You could use brass wire such as Detail Associates instead.

Lester Breuer


Re: Private Name SS Box Car 1536

Lester Breuer
 

Hello Tom,

Thank You for the kind words.

Now, the ladder rungs.  After the molded rungs are removed I drill number #80 or #79 holes along each stile at the rung fastener location.  Next, I do touch up painting.   Once touch up paint was dry I added straight grab irons for the ladder rungs bent from Tichy Train Group (Tichy) #1101, .010” diameter phosphor bronze wire (PBW).  You could use brass wire such as Detail Associates instead.

Lester Breuer


Re: NKP Consist

Walter
 

Bill,

Probably not much changed in the NPPT between your tariff and the one used during the time of the consist. I can’t remember what number the tariff was when I started working for the associated companies. Things were changing between between 1957 and 1969.

Lenny Ohrnell


Re: modeling a crane question

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Doug and Friends,

For a kitbash, the most likely candidate would be the Truscale/TM/Walthers diesel crane. I haven't checked with Walthers to see if these are still available, but they are common enough on the used market. The base is about the right size and the floor and boom mounts would probably make a good start. A new cab could be built up. The big problem is the boom, which is unlike anything I've ever seen. I suppose it all depends on how much scratch-building you can do, or how much compromise you will accept.

I had one of these cranes many years ago, and since I was doing a freelance electric line, I mounted a Suydam pole on the roof. Later I steam-ized the cab. It would have looked nice with a small tender attached.

Electric cranes like these were not uncommon on larger electric railroads. Over the years, the Pacific Electric owned at least seven electric cranes, plus one steamer. Most of their cranes had a wooden box added around the end of the boom as an insulator.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 3/13/19 9:07 PM, mofwcaboose via Groups.Io wrote:
This crane was built by Browning Engineering Company in 1911 as Illinois Traction 830.  Capacity was 43,500 pounds- less than 22 tons. It later became Illinois Terminal 01, as is obvious from the photographs.

The Tichy crane is a 120-tonner and much too large in all dimensions. so that it would be nearly useless as a starting point for a model. 

John C. La Rue, Jr.
Bonita Springs, FL


-----Original Message-----
From: Doug Forbes <dforbes@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Mar 13, 2019 4:31 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] modeling a crane question

The Illinois Traction had an electric wrecking crane that was used both for wreck jobs as well as digging coal out of the two underwater coal storage pits they had built.  I'm looking for recommendations as to how to model such a thing.  I have looked at commercially available kits.  It seems like the Tichy crane frame might work but that a new cab and boom will need to be scratch built or 3D printed or something.  Thoughts?  Still not sure how one would manage a metal crane boom with an overhead powered wire directly above, seems like an electrifying challenge...



This is from the Illinois Terminal Facebook page. 


From 1916.


Re: Missouri Pacific 50-foot SS DD: Modeling from MDC

O Fenton Wells
 

Thanks Don
Fenton

On Wed, Mar 13, 2019 at 8:10 PM Donald B. Valentine via Groups.Io <riverman_vt=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
     Somewhere around here, Fenton, I've got an MDC MoPac car that has been modified to look more like that
in the two photos; i.e. the side sills have been trimmed, details of the end door closing mechanism improved and 
grabs replaced with wire, etc. It did not take a lot of time and really looks quite convincing. I'll see if it can be found
this weekend and also post a photo to give you a comparison of two different modified MDC cars. Certainly one of
MDC's more worthwhile offerings. I have the T&P and W.P. cars still to do and at least one other as well.

Cordially, Don Valentine



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Re: Throwback Thursday: Ambroid PRR Class R7 Reefer

Benjamin Hom
 

Richard Townsend wrote:
"I am amazed that there isn't a high-quality injection molded model of this car and its relatives (i.e. the X23). I am aware of the terrific Westerfield resin kits and the Cannonball plastic kits, but neither is what I am talking about. One lacks quality and the other is not plastic.If we can have Caswell gons, why not R7s?"

There is one high quality HO scale X23 family model on the market - the Broadway Limited Class K7A stock car, which were rebuilt from Class X24 automobile boxcars.  The sound module is goofy and the model needs some work to correct the trucks, but that problem is definitely fixable and documented by Bruce Smith in an early issue of The Keystone Modeler.


Ben Hom


Re: Throwback Tuesday: Varney Metal Freight Car Kits

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Same story and I have most of them.  A “lid” on an open hopper is prototypical, you know.  DL&W and others.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene Green via Groups.Io
Sent: Wednesday, March 13, 2019 11:03 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Tuesday: Varney Metal Freight Car Kits

 

I got my start in model railroading with Varney plastic kits.  Sometime in the early 1950s KIX cereal offered Varney kits with a box top and some token amount of money.  As I recall now, I started with an undecorated unpowered F-unit a couple of box cars and some hopper cars.  Varney's plastic covered hopper was just a "lid" on the open-top, two-bay hopper.  I believe I still have all those cars and the locomotive.

Gene Green 


Re: modeling a crane question

Doug Forbes
 

Hey John,
Thanks for the information!!!  I googled that and came up with an article from Engineering News from 1913 that shows that the base is 13' 6" long and 9' 10" wide, with a 30' goose-neck boom.  That's not a very big crane.  Quite a unique thing to model.  I think ??? I've attached the article but I'm not sure.  
Would appreciate any scratch building, kitbashing, etc ideas.  Awesome stuff. 
This picture is from another old journal and shows the crane in action with some GB hopper/gondolas I've managed to 3D print. 
 


Re: NKP Consist

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Binghamton (where I grew up) is the furthest east that the DL&W could carry the cars before having to hand them over to “the competition,” the ERIE.  Binghamton is also where the interchange with the D&H was.  I think the train was probably, for the most part, going to run to Buffalo to be interchanged with the Lackawanna, which would then run the majority of this train (plus other freight they had collected in the Buffalo area) to Binghamton.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jack Mullen
Sent: Wednesday, March 13, 2019 3:12 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] NKP Consist

 

Schuyler and group,

Assuming the "SKINS" are destined for shoemaking, I'd bet on pigskin.
The numbers in column A are station numbers. They appear to be the originating point on NKP. The more frequent ones are 2446, Madison IL and 1416 Peoria IL.  The NKP Historical Society has a 1950s list of stations online, which I used. Thanks, NKP folks!
The interchange points for cars destined offline are in column E: 1090 Lima OH, and 0 Buffalo. Haven't looked up the others yet.  I'm a bit puzzled by your mention of Binghamton. 

Jack Mullen


Re: modeling a crane question

Patrick Wade
 

For those wanting more info on the Browning Engineering Co, Google: Browning Engineering, Cleveland Memory Project.

Pat Wade
Santa Barbara, CA

On Wed, Mar 13, 2019 at 6:07 PM mofwcaboose via Groups.Io <MOFWCABOOSE=AOL.COM@groups.io> wrote:
This crane was built by Browning Engineering Company in 1911 as Illinois Traction 830.  Capacity was 43,500 pounds- less than 22 tons. It later became Illinois Terminal 01, as is obvious from the photographs.

The Tichy crane is a 120-tonner and much too large in all dimensions. so that it would be nearly useless as a starting point for a model. 

John C. La Rue, Jr.
Bonita Springs, FL


-----Original Message-----
From: Doug Forbes <dforbes@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Mar 13, 2019 4:31 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] modeling a crane question

The Illinois Traction had an electric wrecking crane that was used both for wreck jobs as well as digging coal out of the two underwater coal storage pits they had built.  I'm looking for recommendations as to how to model such a thing.  I have looked at commercially available kits.  It seems like the Tichy crane frame might work but that a new cab and boom will need to be scratch built or 3D printed or something.  Thoughts?  Still not sure how one would manage a metal crane boom with an overhead powered wire directly above, seems like an electrifying challenge...



This is from the Illinois Terminal Facebook page. 


From 1916.


Re: modeling a crane question

David Jobe, Sr.
 

John – Do you happen to have any other information on Browning Engineering and perhaps this crane?  I have not seen anything further in the society’s archives.

 

For those interested, the crane was equipped with a swivel head trolley pole similar to those used on trolley buses.  The first image below shows the way the wheel is mounted at a  near right angle to the pole instead of in line with the pole.  So, in use at the coal pits, the contact wire was suspended to the side of the track rather than over the center line of the track.  In the case of a wreck or other maintenance work, one or two line crews would accompany the crane and temporarily remove the contact wire from the hangers, pull it to one side and rehang it so the crane could still use it for power.

 

Last, the crane had powered trucks and could move on its own.

 

David Jobe, Sr.

Saint Ann, Missouri

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of mofwcaboose via Groups.Io
Sent: Wednesday, March 13, 2019 8:08 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] modeling a crane question

 

This crane was built by Browning Engineering Company in 1911 as Illinois Traction 830.  Capacity was 43,500 pounds- less than 22 tons. It later became Illinois Terminal 01, as is obvious from the photographs.

 

The Tichy crane is a 120-tonner and much too large in all dimensions. so that it would be nearly useless as a starting point for a model. 

 

John C. La Rue, Jr.

Bonita Springs, FL

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Doug Forbes <dforbes@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Mar 13, 2019 4:31 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] modeling a crane question

The Illinois Traction had an electric wrecking crane that was used both for wreck jobs as well as digging coal out of the two underwater coal storage pits they had built.  I'm looking for recommendations as to how to model such a thing.  I have looked at commercially available kits.  It seems like the Tichy crane frame might work but that a new cab and boom will need to be scratch built or 3D printed or something.  Thoughts?  Still not sure how one would manage a metal crane boom with an overhead powered wire directly above, seems like an electrifying challenge...



This is from the Illinois Terminal Facebook page. 


From 1916.


Re: Throwback Thursday: Ambroid PRR Class R7 Reefer

Bill Keene
 

I believe that the stock car was an MKT prototype ... Or at least close to it.

Cheers,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA

On Mar 13, 2019, at 3:26 PM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@comcast.net> wrote:

Tom

Thanks for the great web page link! I now see that my Dad built the whole series #1 except
for the caboose and the stock car.

I was crazy about John Allen as a teen. Not just his modeling, but because his railroad was a business.
He created a narrative to explain the operations and the trains served a purpose. That was a revelation
on a par with the Delta Lines. I know my Dad was deeply influenced by the Delta Lines and I still have
his elaborate layout plans for a never-built layout he drew based on Frank Ellison's work to fit our basement.

Tim O'


On 3/13/2019 5:09 PM, Tom Madden via Groups.Io wrote:

Here's a link to a useful listing of all the Ambroid 1 of 5000 kits:
http://www.trainweb.org/ambroidkits/trains/woodkits/Ambroid_5-Cars.htm

I lusted after them and bought each as they were released. Built all of the first series but gave up buying them after #4 of the second series as it seemed they were really reaching for prototypes. Plus I was deeply into Colorado narrow gauge by then and ended up selling all my '50s era standard gauge models and kits except for my first locomotive, a Mantua Shifter 0-4-0. Still have it. Also still have a small drawer full of Mantua and Comet paper freight car sides. Mostly reefers.

Like many modelers of the time I was greatly influenced by John Allen's articles and Varney ads. Hard to believe he's been gone for over 46 years. I know in some circles his work is no longer greeted with acclaim because he wasn't a prototype modeler and, like Malcolm Furlow's modeling, it seems to lean heavily towards caricature. But the G&D seemed credible and real to me at the time.....

Tom Madden


--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*



wtb sunshine models 37.5, 37.6, 37.7, 37.8, 37.18, 37.19, 37.20

A&Y Dave in MD
 

I am looking for any of the Southern double sheathed car kits by Sunshine Models.  I don't know how many the company made, but I have been unable to locate any since a single kit appeared on eBay 4+ years ago (and Craig Zeni won it and later showed it to me built, sigh).  I'm guessing it was rare due to lack of orders not because everyone bought them out quickly (how I wished I had known when the company was active!).

I'd definitely prefer a kit, but would consider a well-built model, painted or unpainted, (send photos) at this point.

I have 10 of the 36' truss rod SU Westerfield kits, so please don't offer me those.

Thought the STMFC list would be as good as any to locate one of these kits, perhaps far enough back in the "to do" line that someone might be willing to sell it.  

Please email me OFFLIST at
dbott@...  if you have one for sale.   Yes, I'm emailing Jim Hayes for leads, too.

I would consider trading for the 1937 version single door Southern Sunshine kit, which is of more interest to me.  I have one extra unbuilt each of a Smoky Mountain Model Works Southern wood caboose kit complete with trucks and couplers, and a Wright Track as-built Southern bay window cab kit as possible trades.

Thanks,

Dave Bott


Re: Throwback Thursday: Ambroid PRR Class R7 Reefer

Richard Townsend
 

I am amazed that there isn't a high-quality injection molded model of this car and its relatives (i.e. the X23). I am aware of the terrific Westerfield resin kits and the Cannonball plastic kits, but neither is what I am talking about. One lacks quality and the other is not plastic.If we can have Caswell gons, why not R7s?

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Mar 13, 2019 7:07 am
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Ambroid PRR Class R7 Reefer

Ambroid PRR Class R7 reefer ad, February 1959 issue of Model Railroader.


Ben Hom


Re: Throwback Thursday: Ambroid PRR Class R7 Reefer

Ralph W. Brown
 

Hi Tom,
 
Thanks.
 
I have about two dozen Ambroid kits and a handful of the subsequent Northeastern kits, some built, most not or unfinished.  One of the yet to be built Northeastern kits is, I think, the Northeastern version of this kit, “HR-2 Refrigerator PRR.”  It’s been a very long time and the description is a bit generic, so I’m not sure just what it is.  Maybe I’ll more it up my very long list.
 
Pax,
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 

From: Tom Madden via Groups.Io
Sent: Wednesday, March 13, 2019 5:09 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Ambroid PRR Class R7 Reefer
 

Here's a link to a useful listing of all the Ambroid 1 of 5000 kits:
http://www.trainweb.org/ambroidkits/trains/woodkits/Ambroid_5-Cars.htm

I lusted after them and bought each as they were released. Built all of the first series but gave up buying them after #4 of the second series as it seemed they were really reaching for prototypes. Plus I was deeply into Colorado narrow gauge by then and ended up selling all my '50s era standard gauge models and kits except for my first locomotive, a Mantua Shifter 0-4-0. Still have it. Also still have a small drawer full of Mantua and Comet paper freight car sides. Mostly reefers.

Like many modelers of the time I was greatly influenced by John Allen's articles and Varney ads. Hard to believe he's been gone for over 46 years. I know in some circles his work is no longer greeted with acclaim because he wasn't a prototype modeler and, like Malcolm Furlow's modeling, it seems to lean heavily towards caricature. But the G&D seemed credible and real to me at the time.....

Tom Madden


Re: Throwback Thursday: Ambroid PRR Class R7 Reefer

Ralph W. Brown
 

Thanks, Ben.
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 

From: Benjamin Hom
Sent: Wednesday, March 13, 2019 4:09 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Ambroid PRR Class R7 Reefer
 
Ralph Brown asked:
"Does anyone know the number for this 1 of 5000 series kit?"
 
No. 5.
 
 
Ben Hom


Re: modeling a crane question

mofwcaboose <MOFWCABOOSE@...>
 

This crane was built by Browning Engineering Company in 1911 as Illinois Traction 830.  Capacity was 43,500 pounds- less than 22 tons. It later became Illinois Terminal 01, as is obvious from the photographs.

The Tichy crane is a 120-tonner and much too large in all dimensions. so that it would be nearly useless as a starting point for a model. 

John C. La Rue, Jr.
Bonita Springs, FL


-----Original Message-----
From: Doug Forbes <dforbes@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Mar 13, 2019 4:31 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] modeling a crane question

The Illinois Traction had an electric wrecking crane that was used both for wreck jobs as well as digging coal out of the two underwater coal storage pits they had built.  I'm looking for recommendations as to how to model such a thing.  I have looked at commercially available kits.  It seems like the Tichy crane frame might work but that a new cab and boom will need to be scratch built or 3D printed or something.  Thoughts?  Still not sure how one would manage a metal crane boom with an overhead powered wire directly above, seems like an electrifying challenge...



This is from the Illinois Terminal Facebook page. 


From 1916.


Re: NKP Consist

Douglas Harding
 

ARLX 1225 contains PHP, packing house products, with a note DNI, which I think stands for Do Not Ice. PHP could be meat, meat by-products, meat scraps, canned meat, organs, items destined for human consumption or items destined for non-edible. The DNI could mean the load did not need cooling or that had sufficient ice to get to its destination and the shipper did not want to pay for unnecessary ice.

Nice photo of an Armour Steel sided reefer 1900, which may be the same series, on Tony’s blog http://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/2013/05/modeling-meat-reefers-armour-steel-cars.html

 

Intermountain did an HO model lettered for ARLX 1225 https://www.walthers.com/r-40-23-steel-ice-reefer-ready-to-run-armour-arlx-yellow-boxcar-red-red

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Carlson via Groups.Io
Sent: Wednesday, March 13, 2019 12:42 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] NKP Consist

 

I'll try to respond to several questions in one email. 

Schuyler the interchange point is column E. The Empty Erie Auto boxcars came off at Lima.  Much of the Train would be interchanged at Buffalo. The MB-98 was due in Buffalo by 11:30 am every day. Anything that made it to Buffalo for the Erie would be sent to East Buffalo. 

 I am not familiar with the numbers in the 1st column. Station number of the origin points sound right. I need to look these up. (I have the resource "Someplace") 

MB-98 was a fast freight so the low number of empty's is not surprising. The 4 Erie boxcars were probably in Auto Parts. What is interesting is the large block being dropped at Lima for the Erie. Included in the block are several cars going to Buffalo and points east that could have been routed over the NKP to Buffalo. This shows the shipper controlled the routing. 

I'm really interested in ARLX 1225 for Warren PA. This car is not going to Buffalo (0) it's going to 87 I need to look this up. The likely place is Erie but a second class train would be unlikely to stop there to drop one car.

I will be turning the consist into a short article for the NKPHTS so I am saving all the replies for future use. I may also look at modeling all the cars for the NKPHTS Modelers Notebook, our online Ezine. (I am not even an NKP modeler but I like freight cars.) 

Brian J Carlson, P.E.
Cheektowaga NY 


Re: NKP Consist

William Hirt
 

On 3/13/2019 12:41 PM, Brian Carlson via Groups.Io wrote:
I am not familiar with the numbers in the 1st column. Station number of the origin points sound right. I need to look these up. (I have the resource "Someplace")
If you can not find it, I downloaded the PDF file from NKP Historical Society site today. The station numbers are in a booklet called Officers, Agents, Stations etc 1951.


I'm really interested in ARLX 1225 for Warren PA. This car is not going to Buffalo (0) it's going to 87 I need to look this up. The likely place is Erie but a second class train would be unlikely to stop there to drop one car.
87 is shown to be Erie PA. Would it not be too surprising this train stopped at Bellevue, Ohio, the main NKP system yard, to be re-blocked or combined with a train originating from Chicago? There then could be a whole block for Erie then.

The Sanborn maps show a Armour branch house on the NYC in Warren, PA.

Bill Hirt

29821 - 29840 of 192760