Date   

Re: Throwback Thursday

O Fenton Wells
 

Good job Bill, I used to love the wood smell when I opened the Mainline and Ambroid kits kits.  Most of mine were sold as they didn't measure up to today's standards.
Fenton

On Thu, Mar 14, 2019 at 11:30 PM WILLIAM PARDIE <PARDIEW001@...> wrote:







The above cars represent wood craftsman kits that I did back in the 70’s.  These were my first efforts that I considered good enough to be a part of my permanent roster. The C&O well hole flat is a Quality Craft kit.  The Santa Fe Bx 3 is a Suncoast kit.  It is due for a few upgrades.  The NKP hopper is an Ambroid kit that suffered an accident and was rebuilt several years ago.

Fecently I visigted a great “O” scale AT&SF/SP layout in the Bay Area.  There was a string of BX-3 cars all Pecos River Brass with one Suincoast car.  One had to look very close to determine which was which.

Hope you enjoy:

Bill Pardie

Bill Pardie



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Re: Throwback Thursday

Brad Andonian
 

 Bill, this is fine work!    If you saw an atsf bx3 in o scale it was one of two options.  they were done as a wood kit by a forgotten firm and in brass by rich yoder Models.   Pecos River did ATSF covered hoppers, cabeese, stock cars, composite gondolas and tank cars in brass o scale.   I have all mentioned...

On Thursday, March 14, 2019, 8:30 PM, WILLIAM PARDIE <PARDIEW001@...> wrote:








The above cars represent wood craftsman kits that I did back in the 70’s.  These were my first efforts that I considered good enough to be a part of my permanent roster. The C&O well hole flat is a Quality Craft kit.  The Santa Fe Bx 3 is a Suncoast kit.  It is due for a few upgrades.  The NKP hopper is an Ambroid kit that suffered an accident and was rebuilt several years ago.

Fecently I visigted a great “O” scale AT&SF/SP layout in the Bay Area.  There was a string of BX-3 cars all Pecos River Brass with one Suincoast car.  One had to look very close to determine which was which.

Hope you enjoy:

Bill Pardie

Bill Pardie


Re: Throwback Thursday

WILLIAM PARDIE
 








The above cars represent wood craftsman kits that I did back in the 70’s.  These were my first efforts that I considered good enough to be a part of my permanent roster. The C&O well hole flat is a Quality Craft kit.  The Santa Fe Bx 3 is a Suncoast kit.  It is due for a few upgrades.  The NKP hopper is an Ambroid kit that suffered an accident and was rebuilt several years ago.

Fecently I visigted a great “O” scale AT&SF/SP layout in the Bay Area.  There was a string of BX-3 cars all Pecos River Brass with one Suincoast car.  One had to look very close to determine which was which.

Hope you enjoy:

Bill Pardie

Bill Pardie


Re: Throwback Thursday: Ambroid PRR Class R7 Reefer

Richard Townsend
 

Thanks for those comments. Just a few minutes ago I happened to be reading an RMJ article by Richard Hendrickson on the IM ATSF stock cars. I had been thinking that I could justify a PRR K7 stock car with a shipment of breeding stock, and he mentions just that (and a PRR stock car in SoCal and western ones on Long Island). So now maybe I will get one. 

But I still want plastic R7s.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Brent Greer <studegator@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Thu, Mar 14, 2019 6:25 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Ambroid PRR Class R7 Reefer

Keep in mind that in off seasons, stock cars were used to ship any product that would not require weather protection.  We discussed this on this forum not too long ago and some known loads included lumber, tires, bricks, straw, and many other items.  You should think of them more like a ventilated boxcar than just a stock car.  They could be found anywhere.   Much more versatile than people give them credit for.

Brent
________________________________
Dr. J. Brent Greer

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of James SANDIFER <steve.sandifer@...>
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 9:11:55 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Ambroid PRR Class R7 Reefer
 
I have a record of a PRR K7A in San Bernardino in 1946. Of course during war time all sorts of unusual things did happen. Also a 1952 record of a Santa Fe stock car being cleaned in Toronto, Canada.
 
 
J. Stephen Sandifer
 
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Douglas Harding
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 7:36 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Ambroid PRR Class R7 Reefer
 
Richard I had the same thoughts about the Broadway Limited K7A stockcar, until I found a document showing one was loaded in S St Paul MN destined for a  farmer on the M&StL in Iowa, in my time frame. Despite what many think, stockcars did get off road. A PRR stockcar in Colorado? May not be common, but I suspect it did happen.
 
Doug  Harding
 
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Richard Townsend via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 7:16 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Ambroid PRR Class R7 Reefer
 
Thanks, Ben, I had forgotten about that model. Unfortunately, as I my model railroad is set in Colorado, and as I doubt any PRR stock cars made it to Colorado, I have no use for that car, with or without sound. In a way you help me make my point. I'll amend my closing statement from earlier: If we can have Caswell gons and K7 stock cars, why not R7s?
Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Thu, Mar 14, 2019 3:17 am
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Ambroid PRR Class R7 Reefer
Richard Townsend wrote:
"I am amazed that there isn't a high-quality injection molded model of this car and its relatives (i.e. the X23). I am aware of the terrific Westerfield resin kits and the Cannonball plastic kits, but neither is what I am talking about. One lacks quality and the other is not plastic.If we can have Caswell gons, why not R7s?"

There is one high quality HO scale X23 family model on the market - the Broadway Limited Class K7A stock car, which were rebuilt from Class X24 automobile boxcars.  The sound module is goofy and the model needs some work to correct the trucks, but that problem is definitely fixable and documented by Bruce Smith in an early issue of The Keystone Modeler


Ben Hom


Re: Throwback Thursday: Ambroid PRR Class R7 Reefer

Brent Greer
 

Keep in mind that in off seasons, stock cars were used to ship any product that would not require weather protection.  We discussed this on this forum not too long ago and some known loads included lumber, tires, bricks, straw, and many other items.  You should think of them more like a ventilated boxcar than just a stock car.  They could be found anywhere.   Much more versatile than people give them credit for.

Brent
________________________________
Dr. J. Brent Greer


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of James SANDIFER <steve.sandifer@...>
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 9:11:55 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Ambroid PRR Class R7 Reefer
 

I have a record of a PRR K7A in San Bernardino in 1946. Of course during war time all sorts of unusual things did happen. Also a 1952 record of a Santa Fe stock car being cleaned in Toronto, Canada.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Douglas Harding
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 7:36 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Ambroid PRR Class R7 Reefer

 

Richard I had the same thoughts about the Broadway Limited K7A stockcar, until I found a document showing one was loaded in S St Paul MN destined for a  farmer on the M&StL in Iowa, in my time frame. Despite what many think, stockcars did get off road. A PRR stockcar in Colorado? May not be common, but I suspect it did happen.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Richard Townsend via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 7:16 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Ambroid PRR Class R7 Reefer

 

Thanks, Ben, I had forgotten about that model. Unfortunately, as I my model railroad is set in Colorado, and as I doubt any PRR stock cars made it to Colorado, I have no use for that car, with or without sound. In a way you help me make my point. I'll amend my closing statement from earlier: If we can have Caswell gons and K7 stock cars, why not R7s?

Richard Townsend

Lincoln City, OR

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Thu, Mar 14, 2019 3:17 am
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Ambroid PRR Class R7 Reefer

Richard Townsend wrote:
"I am amazed that there isn't a high-quality injection molded model of this car and its relatives (i.e. the X23). I am aware of the terrific Westerfield resin kits and the Cannonball plastic kits, but neither is what I am talking about. One lacks quality and the other is not plastic.If we can have Caswell gons, why not R7s?"

There is one high quality HO scale X23 family model on the market - the Broadway Limited Class K7A stock car, which were rebuilt from Class X24 automobile boxcars.  The sound module is goofy and the model needs some work to correct the trucks, but that problem is definitely fixable and documented by Bruce Smith in an early issue of The Keystone Modeler


Ben Hom


Re: Throwback Thursday: Ambroid PRR Class R7 Reefer

Steve SANDIFER
 

I have a record of a PRR K7A in San Bernardino in 1946. Of course during war time all sorts of unusual things did happen. Also a 1952 record of a Santa Fe stock car being cleaned in Toronto, Canada.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Douglas Harding
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 7:36 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Ambroid PRR Class R7 Reefer

 

Richard I had the same thoughts about the Broadway Limited K7A stockcar, until I found a document showing one was loaded in S St Paul MN destined for a  farmer on the M&StL in Iowa, in my time frame. Despite what many think, stockcars did get off road. A PRR stockcar in Colorado? May not be common, but I suspect it did happen.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Richard Townsend via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 7:16 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Ambroid PRR Class R7 Reefer

 

Thanks, Ben, I had forgotten about that model. Unfortunately, as I my model railroad is set in Colorado, and as I doubt any PRR stock cars made it to Colorado, I have no use for that car, with or without sound. In a way you help me make my point. I'll amend my closing statement from earlier: If we can have Caswell gons and K7 stock cars, why not R7s?

Richard Townsend

Lincoln City, OR

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Thu, Mar 14, 2019 3:17 am
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Ambroid PRR Class R7 Reefer

Richard Townsend wrote:
"I am amazed that there isn't a high-quality injection molded model of this car and its relatives (i.e. the X23). I am aware of the terrific Westerfield resin kits and the Cannonball plastic kits, but neither is what I am talking about. One lacks quality and the other is not plastic.If we can have Caswell gons, why not R7s?"

There is one high quality HO scale X23 family model on the market - the Broadway Limited Class K7A stock car, which were rebuilt from Class X24 automobile boxcars.  The sound module is goofy and the model needs some work to correct the trucks, but that problem is definitely fixable and documented by Bruce Smith in an early issue of The Keystone Modeler


Ben Hom


Re: Throwback Thursday: Ambroid PRR Class R7 Reefer

 

The Cannonball X23 was a pot metal Red Ball car converted to injection molding.  I built one many years ago.  The resin version was the most difficult kit  I ever did.  Usually I work alone, but this kit required the metal forming skill of Randy Anderson, the casting skill of Tom Madden, and the fine scale work of Byron Rose, which I assembled into sides and ends.  Byron also did a section of one of the roofs.  It is feasible these days to do an excellent 3d printed model.  I’m surprised no one has attempted it.  The only difficult part would be the fragility of the ladders.  From what I’ve seen of some recent tank cars, some manufacturers no longer consider this a problem.– Al Westerfield

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Richard Townsend via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 5:16 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Ambroid PRR Class R7 Reefer

 

Thanks, Ben, I had forgotten about that model. Unfortunately, as I my model railroad is set in Colorado, and as I doubt any PRR stock cars made it to Colorado, I have no use for that car, with or without sound. In a way you help me make my point. I'll amend my closing statement from earlier: If we can have Caswell gons and K7 stock cars, why not R7s?

Richard Townsend

Lincoln City, OR

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Thu, Mar 14, 2019 3:17 am
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Ambroid PRR Class R7 Reefer

Richard Townsend wrote:
"I am amazed that there isn't a high-quality injection molded model of this car and its relatives (i.e. the X23). I am aware of the terrific Westerfield resin kits and the Cannonball plastic kits, but neither is what I am talking about. One lacks quality and the other is not plastic.If we can have Caswell gons, why not R7s?"

There is one high quality HO scale X23 family model on the market - the Broadway Limited Class K7A stock car, which were rebuilt from Class X24 automobile boxcars.  The sound module is goofy and the model needs some work to correct the trucks, but that problem is definitely fixable and documented by Bruce Smith in an early issue of The Keystone Modeler.


Ben Hom

 


Re: Throwback Thursday: Ambroid PRR Class R7 Reefer

Douglas Harding
 

Richard I had the same thoughts about the Broadway Limited K7A stockcar, until I found a document showing one was loaded in S St Paul MN destined for a  farmer on the M&StL in Iowa, in my time frame. Despite what many think, stockcars did get off road. A PRR stockcar in Colorado? May not be common, but I suspect it did happen.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Richard Townsend via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 7:16 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Ambroid PRR Class R7 Reefer

 

Thanks, Ben, I had forgotten about that model. Unfortunately, as I my model railroad is set in Colorado, and as I doubt any PRR stock cars made it to Colorado, I have no use for that car, with or without sound. In a way you help me make my point. I'll amend my closing statement from earlier: If we can have Caswell gons and K7 stock cars, why not R7s?

Richard Townsend

Lincoln City, OR

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Thu, Mar 14, 2019 3:17 am
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Ambroid PRR Class R7 Reefer

Richard Townsend wrote:
"I am amazed that there isn't a high-quality injection molded model of this car and its relatives (i.e. the X23). I am aware of the terrific Westerfield resin kits and the Cannonball plastic kits, but neither is what I am talking about. One lacks quality and the other is not plastic.If we can have Caswell gons, why not R7s?"

There is one high quality HO scale X23 family model on the market - the Broadway Limited Class K7A stock car, which were rebuilt from Class X24 automobile boxcars.  The sound module is goofy and the model needs some work to correct the trucks, but that problem is definitely fixable and documented by Bruce Smith in an early issue of The Keystone Modeler.


Ben Hom


Re: Throwback Thursday: Ambroid PRR Class R7 Reefer

Richard Townsend
 

Thanks, Ben, I had forgotten about that model. Unfortunately, as I my model railroad is set in Colorado, and as I doubt any PRR stock cars made it to Colorado, I have no use for that car, with or without sound. In a way you help me make my point. I'll amend my closing statement from earlier: If we can have Caswell gons and K7 stock cars, why not R7s?

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Thu, Mar 14, 2019 3:17 am
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Ambroid PRR Class R7 Reefer

Richard Townsend wrote:
"I am amazed that there isn't a high-quality injection molded model of this car and its relatives (i.e. the X23). I am aware of the terrific Westerfield resin kits and the Cannonball plastic kits, but neither is what I am talking about. One lacks quality and the other is not plastic.If we can have Caswell gons, why not R7s?"

There is one high quality HO scale X23 family model on the market - the Broadway Limited Class K7A stock car, which were rebuilt from Class X24 automobile boxcars.  The sound module is goofy and the model needs some work to correct the trucks, but that problem is definitely fixable and documented by Bruce Smith in an early issue of The Keystone Modeler.


Ben Hom



Thinning the Herd

Rossiter, Mark W <Mark.Rossiter@...>
 

Like many of you, I am taking a hard look at my stash of unbuilt resin kits and have decided that there are some I am never going to get around to building for a variety of reasons.  I am offering up the following kits:

 

  1. West Shore Line Kit #9002 – 1946 New York Central Despatch shops-built Class LO 70-ton covered hopper.  Includes instructions and decals.  This is an EARLY flat kit made of blonde-colored resin.  I’m guessing it was made by Funaro and Camerlengo for Central Hobby Supply in East Syracuse, NY.     $10.00 plus shipping to your zip code.

     

  2. West Shore Line Kit #9602 – B&O M53 Wagontop box car with ‘Plain’ door.  One-piece body made of newer white-colored resin.  Includes instructions, decals and separate details.  I’m guessing it was made by Funaro and Camerlengo for Central Hobby Supply in East Syracuse, NY.  $20.00 plus shipping to your zip code.

     

  3. West Shore Line Kit #9501 – B&O N-34 Round Roof (Wagontop) covered hopper.  Mostly one-piece body made of newer white-colored resin.  Includes instructions, decals, plastic trucks and wheels and separate details.  I’m guessing it was made by Funaro and Camerlengo for Central Hobby Supply in East Syracuse, NY.  $20.00 plus shipping to your zip code.

     

  4. Yankee Clipper Models Kit # CP1929 – Canadian Pacific 1929 ‘Mini’ box car.  This is an EARLY flat kit made of white-colored resin.  I’m guessing it was made by Funaro and Camerlengo for Yankee Clipper Models.  Includes instructions, decals and detail parts.            $15.00 plus shipping to your zip code.

     

  5. Funaro & Camerlengo Kit #6930 -  B&O M53 Wagontop box car with ‘Plain’ door.  (1937-1980’s).  Newer kit with one-piece body made of white-colored resin.  Includes instructions, decals and separate details.  $25.00 plus shipping to your zip code.

     

  6. Funaro & Camerlengo Kit #6932 -  B&O M53 Wagontop box car with Youngstown door.  (1949-1980’s).  Newer kit with one-piece body made of white-colored resin.  Includes instructions, decals and separate details.  $25.00 plus shipping to your zip code.

     

I will gladly combine shipping for multiple kits.  Please reply OFFLINE to mrossiter327@.... 

 


Re: modeling a crane question

John Moore
 

Had trouble getting the attachments to the email.  My copy only had one of the C&EI derricks but two showed up.

Just delete if you wich.
--
okladivjohn@...


Re: modeling a crane question

John Moore
 

Model Railroader had a two part article on modeling a "30 ton derrick" in Jan and Feb 1956. 

It was similar to the C&IE folio sheet for their 100 ton crane.  

There was also a similar crane on the SP de M ca 1929.

John  B. Moore, Jr.
Albuquerque
--
okladivjohn@...


Re: modeling a crane question

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Friends

I did a bit of digging through Ira Swett's CARS OF PACIFIC ELECTRIC, V.3, and came up with some data that might be of interest to the whole question of ITR 1, and other small cranes.

PE's largest electric crane at 60 tons, their 003, built in 1912 by Industrial Works of Bay City, Michigan. The frame of this crane was 24' 5" over the end plates. Bolster centers were 12' 5" for what appear to be arch bar trucks with a 5' 4" wheelbase. Height to the roof was 14' 7". The crane was originally built with a 40' straight boom, but this required crews to take down the wires where the crane was working. In 1920 a shorter gooseneck boom was substituted, which as I mentioned earlier had a wooden housing over the end as an insulator.  The crane was fed by a standard PE Pole, and had motors on the trucks.

For comparison, PE's other "large" crane was a 20-ton capacity Ohio Locomotive Co. steam-powered Model CD. It's length was 20' 1/2". Truck centers were 11' 7 1/8". Trucks were 5' 1" MCB Radial, whatever that means (I'm thinking an arch bar, but the diagram and photos aren't clear on this). Cab was 11' 1" long, and height at the roof was 13' 11", but there was also a stack which took the total height to 18' 4 1/2". The boom was a 40' latice type, and apparently was never changed to a gooseneck. Yes, it did have a similar insulator wooden box. I believe Lifelike once sold a crane around this size which might supply the frame, cab base and boom.

PE's other cranes were conversions of freight or passenger cars, having a boom mounted on the deck near the car's end, and are not anything like these two machines, or the ITR crane.

A number of general arrangement diagrams for WP cranes are online at https://www.wplives.com/diagrams/mow/1947/index.php . It isn't always clear what the cranes' capacities are, but there is a lot to be learned here that could help with a model.

Have fun!


Garth Groff


Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Help With Wabash Tank Car ID

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Gary;

Wow, that's a rare one: a 5-course radial construction tank with 5 bands, and wood cradle, inset stirrup steps, and a "different" looking underframe; probably pre-1915 construction. Some early early GATC cars looked similar to this, but this could also be a predecessor manufacturer. A better look at the bolsters could tell us more, but I cannot seem them. The smallish dome is also a more common feature of these early tank cars. We cannot see the dome vents, which is also an indicator of time period. The dome platform does not look original to the car; it may be a Wabash add.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gary Roe
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2019 1:43 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Help With Wabash Tank Car ID

The Wabash purchased 10 tank cars for company service from the American Cotton Oil Company in 1924. They were numbered 3160-3169, and had a capacity of 40 tons - 7700 gallons. Unfortunately, company freight car equipment registers do not state the builder of these cars. I would appreciate any help in determining who built them.

A photo of one is located at this address: Blockedhttp://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=4052881

Thank you in advance!

gary roe
quincy, illinois


Help With Wabash Tank Car ID

Gary Roe
 

The Wabash purchased 10 tank cars for company service from the American Cotton Oil Company in 1924.  They were numbered 3160-3169, and had a capacity of 40 tons - 7700 gallons.  Unfortunately, company freight car equipment registers do not state the builder of these cars.  I would appreciate any help in determining who built them.

A photo of one is located at this address: http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=4052881

Thank you in advance!

gary roe
quincy, illinois


Re: modeling a crane question

Tim O'Connor
 

"Railroad History" #160 (publication of the R&LHS) has a 10 page article on
Santa Fe 120 ton Brownhoist cranes and some comparison with earlier cranes
that some modelers might find useful.

Tim O'Connor

On 3/14/2019 10:33 AM, Spen Kellogg wrote:
On 3/13/2019 10:21 PM, Doug Forbes wrote:
Hey John,
Thanks for the information!!!  I googled that and came up with an
article from Engineering News from 1913 that shows that the base is
13' 6" long and 9' 10" wide, with a 30' goose-neck boom. That's not a
very big crane.  Quite a unique thing to model.  I think ??? I've
attached the article but I'm not sure.
Would appreciate any scratch building, kitbashing, etc ideas. Awesome
stuff.
Doug,

Since the Tichy crane boom is twice the size of the one you want to
model, might there be an N scale crane that could provide a boom close
to what you need? Or possibly a boom from a construction vehicle in HO
or S scale; Herpa comes to mind?

Spen Kellogg
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Re: modeling a crane question

Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
 

Given the capacity the ITS crane is more closely related to what was called a locomotive crane rather than a wrecker. The fooler is the custom boom. I seem to recall that Walthers offered a powered locomotive crane 10 or 12 years ago that might be a good starting point.
Dennis Storzek


Re: modeling a crane question

Spen Kellogg <spninetynine@...>
 

On 3/13/2019 10:21 PM, Doug Forbes wrote:
Hey John,
Thanks for the information!!!  I googled that and came up with an
article from Engineering News from 1913 that shows that the base is
13' 6" long and 9' 10" wide, with a 30' goose-neck boom. That's not a
very big crane.  Quite a unique thing to model.  I think ??? I've
attached the article but I'm not sure.
Would appreciate any scratch building, kitbashing, etc ideas. Awesome
stuff.
Doug,

Since the Tichy crane boom is twice the size of the one you want to
model, might there be an N scale crane that could provide a boom close
to what you need? Or possibly a boom from a construction vehicle in HO
or S scale; Herpa comes to mind?

Spen Kellogg


Re: NKP Consist

Michael Mang
 

Tim,

The Lackawanna's route to Maybrook was via the L&HR, interchanging at Port Morris NJ. Cars were sent to the New Haven via ferry, but the L&HR connection was better.

Michael Mang


On Thu, Mar 14, 2019 at 10:08 AM Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

The Lackawanna had no interchanges with the L&HR, L&NE, NYS&W or NYO&W who could
have forwarded cars to the New Haven via Maybrook, or directly to the car ferries that could have
forwarded cars to the New Haven across the Hudson River?

On 3/13/2019 11:49 PM, Schuyler Larrabee via Groups.Io wrote:

Binghamton (where I grew up) is the furthest east that the DL&W could carry the cars before having to hand them over to “the competition,” the ERIE.  Binghamton is also where the interchange with the D&H was.  I think the train was probably, for the most part, going to run to Buffalo to be interchanged with the Lackawanna, which would then run the majority of this train (plus other freight they had collected in the Buffalo area) to Binghamton.

 

Schuyler


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: NKP Consist

Tim O'Connor
 


The Lackawanna had no interchanges with the L&HR, L&NE, NYS&W or NYO&W who could
have forwarded cars to the New Haven via Maybrook, or directly to the car ferries that could have
forwarded cars to the New Haven across the Hudson River?

On 3/13/2019 11:49 PM, Schuyler Larrabee via Groups.Io wrote:

Binghamton (where I grew up) is the furthest east that the DL&W could carry the cars before having to hand them over to “the competition,” the ERIE.  Binghamton is also where the interchange with the D&H was.  I think the train was probably, for the most part, going to run to Buffalo to be interchanged with the Lackawanna, which would then run the majority of this train (plus other freight they had collected in the Buffalo area) to Binghamton.

 

Schuyler


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Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

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