Date   

2019 St. Louis Railroad Prototype Modelers Meet

Richard McQuade
 

Can anybody direct me to the website for this meet. I tried the RPM site and there wasn't anything there. I thought that the Meet would have its own site but if it does, I can't seem to find the proper address for it.
Thanks.
Richard McQuade


Re: poultry cars - photos taken on the DL&W in Jersey City in 1928

Douglas Harding
 

Claus it does appear to be poultry cars in the photos. And you are correct, strings of poultry cars did stream into large metro markets, esp those that served a Jewish population. Jewish dietary rules lead Jewish housewives to prefer live birds, vs dressed birds. New York City, the largest market, received 250 poultry cars a week in the 20s & 30s. Jersey City, location of the photos, was across the river from NYC, so it’s quite possible Jersey City  was receiving poultry. But Jersey City was home to many railroad piers that served NYC. The location of the photo is adjacent to the Hoboken terminal. Its more likely the cars were for delivery to NYC via a ferry ride.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Friday, April 5, 2019 9:34 AM
To: STMFC
Subject: [RealSTMFC] poultry cars - photos taken on the DL&W in Jersey City in 1928

 

Hi List Members,

 

Consider if you will for a moment this photo taken on the DL&W in Jersey City in 1928...

 

 

On the left side of the image, at about mid-height, is a small yard that seems to consist of team tracks. There is a string on cars visible just to the right of a gantry crane. They appear to all be poultry cars. Too bad we cannot get sharper detail on this image.

 

A second image shows a somewhat better view of these - the cars are on the right side of the image above a business that seems to have a sign saying GEORGE BLAIR...

 

 

From what I have seen, it appears to be common practice for poultry cars to be delivered as a string for unloading at team track locations near major metropolitan areas.

 

Enjoy!

 

Claus Schlund

 


RPM-East wrap up

Eric Hansmann
 

It’s been a busy couple of weeks catching up after traveling to the RPM-East prototype modeler meet. I’ve posted a short trip summary on my DesignBuildOp blog with links to the RPM-East photo gallery. I thank John Albert, Larry Linger, and Andy Blenko for sharing event photos to beef up the gallery.

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/2019/04/05/2019-rpm-east-wrap-up/

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN


poultry cars - photos taken on the DL&W in Jersey City in 1928

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
Consider if you will for a moment this photo taken on the DL&W in Jersey City in 1928...
 
 
On the left side of the image, at about mid-height, is a small yard that seems to consist of team tracks. There is a string on cars visible just to the right of a gantry crane. They appear to all be poultry cars. Too bad we cannot get sharper detail on this image.
 
A second image shows a somewhat better view of these - the cars are on the right side of the image above a business that seems to have a sign saying GEORGE BLAIR...
 
 
From what I have seen, it appears to be common practice for poultry cars to be delivered as a string for unloading at team track locations near major metropolitan areas.
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 


Re: RI 133510 from flour loading topic (Look At The Boards)

Bill Daniels <billinsf@...>
 

The only kit (in HO) that I know of that made an attempt to do something like this is the Gould/Tichy USRA boxcar. Instead of scribing the wood boards Bill Gould placed the alternating boards at slightly different heights, giving the impression of separate boards without the highly out of scale groves so common in most models.

Bill Daniels


Re: Throwback Thursday: Athearn Metal Tank Car Kits

Tony Thompson
 

Garth Groff wrote:

Thanks for the tip, but I don't have an Athearn 10K tank. I have 8Ks and a 12.5K. The Mantua is a 10K though.

    My apologies for misreading your original post. Globe did make an 8000-gallon tank, but Athearn did not, thus my comment on what Athearn called their "shorty" tank. Your 8000-gallon cars must be Globe models. I discussed the crossovers between Athearn metal tanks, and Globe tank cars, in a blog post awhile ago. You can read it here:


The two companies and their offerings should not IMO be mingled.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: Throwback Thursday: Athearn Metal Tank Car Kits

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Tony,

Thanks for the tip, but I don't have an Athearn 10K tank. I have 8Ks and a 12.5K. The Mantua is a 10K though.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 4/4/19 7:52 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:
Garth Groff wrote:

I have several of these Athearn/Globe cars I've scarfed up at train shows--an 8K twin dome, two 8K single domes, and a 12.5K with a single full-height dome  . . .

    Garth, if you measure an Athearn metal "shorty" tank car, you will find it is very close to 10,000 gallons. The measurement and calculation is simple, as I showed in a blog post some time back. If you're interested, here is a link:


Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history







Re: boxcar flour loading topic

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

Thanks Dennis.  I'll check the local Pot Shop.

Bill



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
Date: 4/4/19 1:29 PM (GMT-10:00)
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] boxcar flour loading topic

The paper is either lining paper folded around the door post and tacked as the recent flour load photos show or paper tacked over the door opening to make a dust tight seal. Either way the ends of the roll paper stuck out past the door when it was closed. I should think narrow strips of thin paper like cigarette paper attached with matte medium should model it well.
Dennis Storzek


Re: Throwback Thursday: Athearn Metal Tank Car Kits

Tony Thompson
 

Garth Groff wrote:

I have several of these Athearn/Globe cars I've scarfed up at train shows--an 8K twin dome, two 8K single domes, and a 12.5K with a single full-height dome  . . .

    Garth, if you measure an Athearn metal "shorty" tank car, you will find it is very close to 10,000 gallons. The measurement and calculation is simple, as I showed in a blog post some time back. If you're interested, here is a link:


Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: ATSF boxcar roof question

mopacfirst
 

I looked at the photo you reference, and I agree the end of the car, while only partly visible, kind of looks like the top rib is rectangular.  The Santa Fe Boxcar book by Dobyne doesn't show an end view in the two shots it has, but 'Santa Fe Freight in Color - the series', which is actually volume 1 of 1, has several.  There, the ends of the cars pictured are fairly clearly shown as being the 4-4 rolling pin style, both as regular boxcars and as converted for perlite service with small roof hatches.

The photo you cite is clearly taken after 1959, by virtue of the paint scheme, when the cars were 11+ years old.  Perhaps that car did have a replacement end as a result of wreck repair.  I'd feel more confident in this if I could see more of that one car, but I'd be really surprised if more than one photo of this were to surface.

Ron Merrick


Re: boxcar flour loading topic

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

OOOOPS!  Guess I was thinking of grain 
doors.  Thanks Lester.

Bull Pardie



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: WILLIAM PARDIE <PARDIEW001@...>
Date: 4/4/19 7:08 AM (GMT-10:00)
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] boxcar flour loading topic

I seem to recall an article by Martin Loftin in RMC covering modeling the paper door seals.  Does anyone else recall the article or have any other modeling ideas?  Many prototype photos seem to have paper protruding from the sides of closed doors.

Bill Pardie



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: George LaPray <agrail.george@...>
Date: 4/4/19 6:43 AM (GMT-10:00)
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] boxcar flour loading topic

Boxcars used for bagged flour loading were most often "lined" with with heavy craft paper, this was for two principal reasons, 1. sanitary - it kept the flour bags cleaner, 2, to reduce damage to the flour sacks, the heavy paper covered over minor rough areas of the interior car lining that had a tendancy to catch on and tear the flour sacks.  Most often the lining consisted  of rolls of heavy paper which were unrolled and tacked up on the sides and floor of the boxcar.  I never saw canvas used as car lining as it would be expensive, but I certainly cannot say in never happened.  When flour cars had to be fumigated, canvas would often be used across the doorway area to help the fumigant not all escape to the atmosphere.   

The Kennedy Car Liner company made a pre-folded paper liner which could be unfolded and efficiently and quickly lined half of a 40' boxcar, so two car liners did the whole car.  The Kennedy liners were also used on boxcars for bulk flax loading, the nature of flax being that it would flow like water and leak badly from even the smallest hole in a car.  In the 70's Western RR Assn. graindoor dept. still had a large inventory of Kennedy car liners, which by that time were not seeing mush use.  I used a bunch of them to line boxcars in wood chip service which had been pressed into use to move a huge order of malting barley from Twin Cities to Mexico.  

The RRs supplied the car liners or material, but the flour mill or elevator had to pay RR is they wanted them to install them.

George
Old RR grainguy  


Re: boxcar flour loading topic

Dennis Storzek
 

The paper is either lining paper folded around the door post and tacked as the recent flour load photos show or paper tacked over the door opening to make a dust tight seal. Either way the ends of the roll paper stuck out past the door when it was closed. I should think narrow strips of thin paper like cigarette paper attached with matte medium should model it well.
Dennis Storzek


Re: RI 133510 from flour loading topic (Look At The Boards)

np328
 

   I have some photos in a file of this group of the same lament. They have been there for a while. https://realstmfc.groups.io/g/main/files/Wood%20Sided%20Freight%20Car%20Debate

   It is also why I made note of how tight the boards are in the original posting. 

I talked with a resin builder at Cocoa ..five(?)..years ago. And they stated in reply almost exactly the first and second sentence  Bill you wrote. 

   My primary modeled railroad is the NP, and they used wood in sheathing of their cars well past when others went to steel, and later photos do not show warped distressed boards. 
The inspectors at the NP shops took pride in having above average maintenance of their car fleet, and would have had substandard cars shopped.
I have copies of internal letters where this is noted. 

Rather well maintained cars as in your example Andy.  I would purchase cars with sides like that. I would prefer cars with sides like you did.
Perhaps they need to be marketed as "correct to scale wood sheathing" or something like that.

Dave, it is not a rant. It is a most valid concern.  So carry on speaking out about it.
Folks here speak about proper brake wheels or brake pipe runs or side tabs, sheathing to scale is certainly within a topic of review.
   
When ever I am presenting, and a photo of a SS car with tight sheathing like the RI car comes up, I take a second to point it out. Once folks are aware of this, they will notice it more and more.                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Jim Dick  - Roseville MN                                                                                             


Re: Throwback Thursday: Athearn Metal Tank Car Kits

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Friends,

I have several of these Athearn/Globe cars I've scarfed up at train shows--an 8K twin dome, two 8K single domes, and a 12.5K with a single full-height dome (like the later Athearn plastic single short dome car). I replaced the abnormally short domes on the two 8K singles with parts from my scrap box.
I also have a similar Mantua tank car which was missing its paper wrapper and ended up on a shortened Athearn underframe. After several tries to make my own wrapper on the computer I gave up and assembled it as a GATX welded car I photographed in Sacramento years ago.

I like these older cars. They're fun to build or rebuild, and in some ways better than their mass-market plastic successors, except for a lack of grab irons.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff


On 4/4/19 1:30 PM, Dave Lawler wrote:
In my memory, those cars cars were pretty nice for their time
except their running board castings were quite brittle.
Dave Lawler


Re: RI 133510 from flour loading topic

Tony Thompson
 

Andy Carlson wrote:

Pratt or Truss? A very easy distinquishing way (for me); if the diagonals are in compression--it is a Howe. Otherwise, a diagonal in tension would be a Pratt.

      Exactly, and well said, Andy. There is, of course, an engineer's eyeball peering through that message.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: Throwback Thursday: Athearn Metal Tank Car Kits

 

I still have one, but over the many moves 3 doors were lost.  I completed one good side and plugged the openings with styrene.  Since only one side will show on the layout, it’s (almost) as good as new. – Al Westerfield

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Dave Lawler
Sent: Thursday, April 4, 2019 10:33 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Athearn Metal Tank Car Kits

 

In my memory, those cars cars were pretty nice for their time

except their running board castings were quite brittle.

Dave Lawler

 


Re: Throwback Thursday: Athearn Metal Tank Car Kits

Dave Lawler
 

In my memory, those cars cars were pretty nice for their time
except their running board castings were quite brittle.
Dave Lawler


Re: Throwback Thursday: Athearn Metal Tank Car Kits

william darnaby
 

Interesting.  Using an inflation calculator of 10 this was pretty serious money back then, just about $23 today.  I purchased a built up Crystal Car Line version off the used/bargain table of my local hobby shop in 1966 and it still runs in my op sessions today.  It is probably…almost certainly… the oldest car on my railroad.

 

Bill Darnaby

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Benjamin Hom
Sent: Thursday, April 4, 2019 9:01 AM
To: STMFC <main@realstmfc.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Throwback Thursday: Athearn Metal Tank Car Kits

 

Athearn Tank Cars ad, December 1951 issue of Railroad Model Craftsman.





Ben Hom 


Re: boxcar flour loading topic

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

I seem to recall an article by Martin Loftin in RMC covering modeling the paper door seals.  Does anyone else recall the article or have any other modeling ideas?  Many prototype photos seem to have paper protruding from the sides of closed doors.

Bill Pardie



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: George LaPray <agrail.george@...>
Date: 4/4/19 6:43 AM (GMT-10:00)
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] boxcar flour loading topic

Boxcars used for bagged flour loading were most often "lined" with with heavy craft paper, this was for two principal reasons, 1. sanitary - it kept the flour bags cleaner, 2, to reduce damage to the flour sacks, the heavy paper covered over minor rough areas of the interior car lining that had a tendancy to catch on and tear the flour sacks.  Most often the lining consisted  of rolls of heavy paper which were unrolled and tacked up on the sides and floor of the boxcar.  I never saw canvas used as car lining as it would be expensive, but I certainly cannot say in never happened.  When flour cars had to be fumigated, canvas would often be used across the doorway area to help the fumigant not all escape to the atmosphere.   

The Kennedy Car Liner company made a pre-folded paper liner which could be unfolded and efficiently and quickly lined half of a 40' boxcar, so two car liners did the whole car.  The Kennedy liners were also used on boxcars for bulk flax loading, the nature of flax being that it would flow like water and leak badly from even the smallest hole in a car.  In the 70's Western RR Assn. graindoor dept. still had a large inventory of Kennedy car liners, which by that time were not seeing mush use.  I used a bunch of them to line boxcars in wood chip service which had been pressed into use to move a huge order of malting barley from Twin Cities to Mexico.  

The RRs supplied the car liners or material, but the flour mill or elevator had to pay RR is they wanted them to install them.

George
Old RR grainguy  


boxcar flour loading topic

George LaPray
 

Boxcars used for bagged flour loading were most often "lined" with with heavy craft paper, this was for two principal reasons, 1. sanitary - it kept the flour bags cleaner, 2, to reduce damage to the flour sacks, the heavy paper covered over minor rough areas of the interior car lining that had a tendancy to catch on and tear the flour sacks.  Most often the lining consisted  of rolls of heavy paper which were unrolled and tacked up on the sides and floor of the boxcar.  I never saw canvas used as car lining as it would be expensive, but I certainly cannot say in never happened.  When flour cars had to be fumigated, canvas would often be used across the doorway area to help the fumigant not all escape to the atmosphere.   

The Kennedy Car Liner company made a pre-folded paper liner which could be unfolded and efficiently and quickly lined half of a 40' boxcar, so two car liners did the whole car.  The Kennedy liners were also used on boxcars for bulk flax loading, the nature of flax being that it would flow like water and leak badly from even the smallest hole in a car.  In the 70's Western RR Assn. graindoor dept. still had a large inventory of Kennedy car liners, which by that time were not seeing mush use.  I used a bunch of them to line boxcars in wood chip service which had been pressed into use to move a huge order of malting barley from Twin Cities to Mexico.  

The RRs supplied the car liners or material, but the flour mill or elevator had to pay RR is they wanted them to install them.

George
Old RR grainguy  

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