Date   
Re: Mainline Modeler collection disposal.

Nelson Moyer
 

I looked up the media that qualify for media mail rates on the USPS web site, and magazines and newspapers aren’t listed. Maybe the rules changed?

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Tuesday, April 16, 2019 7:20 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Mainline Modeler collection disposal.

 

On Tue, Apr 16, 2019 at 02:09 PM, Gary Roe wrote:

Tim,

 

My local post office told me that you cannot ship magazines Media Mail, since they contain advertisements.  It's probably done all the time; but...

And newspapers don't? Newly printed magazines go media mail... as I recall, to qualify, the magazine has to be less than a certain percentage of advertising, I want to say 50% , but it may have been slightly less, such as 45%. Any more than that is an ad flyer, which doesn't qualify. Whatever, if it was initially delivered via media mail, it qualifies to go that way again.

Dennis Storzek

Re: Mainline Modeler collection disposal.

Dennis Storzek
 

On Tue, Apr 16, 2019 at 02:09 PM, Gary Roe wrote:
Tim,
 
My local post office told me that you cannot ship magazines Media Mail, since they contain advertisements.  It's probably done all the time; but...
And newspapers don't? Newly printed magazines go media mail... as I recall, to qualify, the magazine has to be less than a certain percentage of advertising, I want to say 50% , but it may have been slightly less, such as 45%. Any more than that is an ad flyer, which doesn't qualify. Whatever, if it was initially delivered via media mail, it qualifies to go that way again.

Dennis Storzek

Re: Mainline Modeler collection disposal.

Gary Roe
 

Tim,

My local post office told me that you cannot ship magazines Media Mail, since they contain advertisements.  It's probably done all the time; but...

gary roe
quincy, illinois




On ‎Tuesday‎, ‎April‎ ‎16‎, ‎2019‎ ‎03‎:‎55‎:‎30‎ ‎PM‎ ‎CDT, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:



Media Mail is still quite inexpensive. You probably can ship a year's
worth of issues across the country
for just a few dollars. Just pack them between sheets of cardboard.


On 4/16/2019 3:49 PM, Denny Anspach wrote:
> Friends, I am in possession of two gifted  boxes of about 170 issues of MAINLINE MODELER dating from early 1983 well into the 21stC.  I have no notion of continuity, and some issues have reportedly had articles removed. (primarily SP, I would guess).  Although I am essentially over such habits, I too could possibly save out some issues/articles prior to eventual definite disposal. I am thoroughly amazed at the sheer volume and quality of information about prototype modeling projects, materials, techniques, and the quality photos to supplement all.  Great bed time leafing/reading!
>
> My point:  Prior to any notion of disposal, these are FREE to anyone willing to pick them up FOB. I could ship them, but only at great(!)  expense.
>
> If interested, and you are decisive, let me know OFF LIST.
>
> Denny
>   
> Denny S. Anspach MD
> Sacramento CA


--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*



Re: Mainline Modeler collection disposal.

Tim O'Connor
 

Media Mail is still quite inexpensive. You probably can ship a year's worth of issues across the country
for just a few dollars. Just pack them between sheets of cardboard.

On 4/16/2019 3:49 PM, Denny Anspach wrote:
Friends, I am in possession of two gifted boxes of about 170 issues of MAINLINE MODELER dating from early 1983 well into the 21stC. I have no notion of continuity, and some issues have reportedly had articles removed. (primarily SP, I would guess). Although I am essentially over such habits, I too could possibly save out some issues/articles prior to eventual definite disposal. I am thoroughly amazed at the sheer volume and quality of information about prototype modeling projects, materials, techniques, and the quality photos to supplement all. Great bed time leafing/reading!

My point: Prior to any notion of disposal, these are FREE to anyone willing to pick them up FOB. I could ship them, but only at great(!) expense.

If interested, and you are decisive, let me know OFF LIST.

Denny
Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento CA
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*

Mainline Modeler collection disposal.

Denny Anspach
 

Friends, I am in possession of two gifted boxes of about 170 issues of MAINLINE MODELER dating from early 1983 well into the 21stC. I have no notion of continuity, and some issues have reportedly had articles removed. (primarily SP, I would guess). Although I am essentially over such habits, I too could possibly save out some issues/articles prior to eventual definite disposal. I am thoroughly amazed at the sheer volume and quality of information about prototype modeling projects, materials, techniques, and the quality photos to supplement all. Great bed time leafing/reading!

My point: Prior to any notion of disposal, these are FREE to anyone willing to pick them up FOB. I could ship them, but only at great(!) expense.

If interested, and you are decisive, let me know OFF LIST.

Denny

Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento CA

Re: Scratchbuilding a car in styrene

Dennis Storzek
 

And another interesting page that illustrates the proper use of the terms T&G. shiplap, bevel siding and drop siding, for those who care. While not very applicable to freightcars, all these wood products were carried in freightcars at one time:

horizontal-siding-guide

Re: Scratchbuilding a car in styrene

Dennis Storzek
 

Finally found a current version of the WWPA standard architectural siding patterns, which should give some form to all the names that have come up in this discussion. WWPA Siding Patterns

 Dennis Storzek

Re: Throwback Tuesday: Athearn Rolling Stock Ad, Model Railroader October 1959

Benjamin Hom
 

Larry Smith wrote:
"The hopper car with some added parts is a very accurate model of a C&O car as well as the B&O car.  There have been several articles on adding the parts to the C&O versions."

Here's one take on this upgrade:

The Athearn 40 ft offset quad is the ARA standard 70-ton quadruple hopper, with details closer B&O Class W-2 (non-peaked end, ladders vice grabs).  It has not aged well - along with the usual issues with molded-on details and oversized sill steps and handbrake, the operating doors are especially overscale and toylike and the three brake components molded in one lump.  It is the second of the two most ill-used models of all time (the first is the Athearn 40 ft steel boxcar), decorated in any hopper paint and lettering scheme and copied by many other manufacturers (Tyco, Rivarossi/Roco/AHM/Mehano, Cox/Bachmann) who offered even more bogus schemes.  (There are actually quite a few legitimate paint schemes for these cars.)

This prototype has most recently been done by Broadway Limited and MTH and covered in Railway Prototype Cyclopedia Volumes 5 and 14.


Ben Hom


Re: Throwback Tuesday: Athearn Rolling Stock Ad, Model Railroader October 1959

Lester Breuer
 

The Athearn enclosed pickle tank can be reworked into a reasonable Heinz Prototype.
Lester Breuer

Re: Scratchbuilding a car in styrene

George LaPray
 

A number of years ago, I was in a Menard;s store (Wisc. based home improvement chain similar to Lowe's Home Depot) and they were selling a product they called "car siding" which appeared to be just that, railroad freight car siding.   Maybe Menards had a unique take on what "car siding was/is since a number of members of the family were long time C&NW veterans.

George LaPray

Re: Throwback Tuesday: Athearn Rolling Stock Ad, Model Railroader October 1959

Larry Smith
 

The hopper car with some added parts is a very accurate model of a C&O car as well as the B&O car.  There have been several articles on adding the parts to the C&O versions.

Larry Smith

On Tuesday, April 16, 2019, 9:18:01 AM CDT, Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...> wrote:


Athearn Rolling Stock Ad from the October 1959 issue of Model Railroader.


Ben Hom 

Throwback Tuesday: Athearn Rolling Stock Ad, Model Railroader October 1959

Benjamin Hom
 

Athearn Rolling Stock Ad from the October 1959 issue of Model Railroader.


Ben Hom 

Re: Scratchbuilding a car in styrene

Dennis Storzek
 

On Mon, Apr 15, 2019 at 07:45 PM, Ralph W. Brown wrote:
I suspect some ignorant home improvement guru called it “shiplap,” others liked the name, and the misnomer stuck.  Oh, well . . .
No, "shiplap" used to have a specific meaning in the lumber and construction industries, it was lumber with the edges milled with a rabbet on each edge half the width of the edge, so the boards overlapped when laid flat. Nothing was said about how the surface of the board was milled, and shiplap was common on lesser quality boards that were typically used for the sub-flooring under hardwood floors, and sub-siding behind the finish siding. Back in the days before house wraps, the overlapping joints kept out the drafts even if the boards shrank. The home improvement gurus seem to be using the general term for other patterns that provide a rabbet for the top edge, even though the generally accepted term for these patterns was "novelty siding" with different mills having specific names for the pattern of the cut-out reveal: Drop siding, Duch drop, Dolly Varden...

The self covering of the gap at the joint is the reason why the Master Car Builders Association adopted the pattern for flooring and lining of boxcars; if the boards shrank as they dried out, they still wouldn't leak grain from the joints. Several of the mill sections shown in this illustration from the 1922 CBC are shiplap:


Re: Doors with inside detail

jerryglow2
 

See my post in the thread on grain level markings. It contains a PDF of interiors with doors.

Re: Scratchbuilding a car in styrene

Ralph W. Brown
 

Hi Tony,
 
I don’t think we really have a disagreement here.  I understand what is being called “shiplap,” but regardless of what it’s called, it has nothing to do with boat or ship building methods.  As such, it is a complete and total misnomer.  As far as I know, it has nothing to do with freight car construction either.
 
How did we get off onto “shiplap” anyway?
 
Pax,
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 

From: Tony Thompson
Sent: Monday, April 15, 2019 10:53 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Scratchbuilding a car in styrene
 
Ralph Brown wrote:

In the seafaring sense, “shiplap,” is more correctly called “lapstrake” (typically pronounced lap-strack) or “clinker-built.”  The architectural equivalent would be clapboard (sometimes pronounced kla-bord).  So, what you “always thought” is correct.

    Sorry, Ralph, not so. Clapboard and lap-strake have similarities, but they are NOT the same as shiplap. True shiplap is just a plain board rabbeted top and bottom for a snug fit. That is not true of clapboard. Novelty or Drop siding has a more sculptured overlap, but shiplap has none. Sometimes shiplap is laid with a slight gap between boards (revealing the rabbet) but is normally laid tight.
 
Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history
 



 

Re: Scratchbuilding a car in styrene

Nelson Moyer
 

Not quite that simple. Novelty siding is a generic category, and there are many sub-categories.

 

http://www.woodsiding.com/pattern.htm

 

Both clapboard and shiplap are sub-categories of novelty siding.

 

Vinyl Dutch Lap siding has a slightly different profile than the wood version.

 

http://www.all-about-siding.com/dutch-lap-siding.html

 

 

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tony Thompson
Sent: Monday, April 15, 2019 9:18 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Scratchbuilding a car in styrene

 

Google it and you’ll find that Novelty, Dutch Drop, German Drop, Cove, and Drop siding are all the same thing.

Tony Thompson 


On Apr 15, 2019, at 6:10 PM, Jake Schaible <jjschaible@...> wrote:

No Joanna... that's not Shiplap.

 

https://thecraftsmanblog.com/no-joanna-thats-not-shiplap/

Re: Scratchbuilding a car in styrene

Ralph W. Brown
 

Nice, Jack!
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 

From: Jack Burgess
Sent: Monday, April 15, 2019 6:50 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Scratchbuilding a car in styrene
 

Car siding is T&G with a V-grove. Floor material is also typically T&G without the reveal…the advantage of T&G is that the boards will stay flat (for floors) or even with box cars.

 

You can still buy 3 ¼” V-groove T&G from a lumber yard (that is the same size boards typically use for freight cars). I bought some a few months ago and used it to fill in what had originally been lattice work. The hardware was (with permission) removed from a Yosemite Valley Railroad stock car.

 

Jack Burgess

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Charlie Vlk
Sent: Monday, April 15, 2019 2:13 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Scratchbuilding a car in styrene

 

Randy Hees and all-

A question not directly related to Freight Cars other than being a load or possibly mislabeled car siding….

One of the cable TV home remodeling shows has an interior designer that has to use what she calls “shiplap” on every project episode…to the point it could be a drinking game of a shot for every time she mentions it.

I always thought “shiplap” was a profile that had overlapping boards like those on a traditional wooden runabout….somewhat akin to clapboard house siding.   The material she calls “shiplap” is to me a form of tongue and groove siding with a small reveal between boards (more than car siding).  

Modern usage of the term is confused as Wikipedia shows a building with “shiplap” that is a form of Novelty Siding….flat faced vertical board with a scalloped top that fits underneath the next board up.

Anyone have old millwork references that might show correct terminology?

Charlie Vlk 

Re: Scratchbuilding a car in styrene

Tony Thompson
 

Ralph Brown wrote:

In the seafaring sense, “shiplap,” is more correctly called “lapstrake” (typically pronounced lap-strack) or “clinker-built.”  The architectural equivalent would be clapboard (sometimes pronounced kla-bord).  So, what you “always thought” is correct.

    Sorry, Ralph, not so. Clapboard and lap-strake have similarities, but they are NOT the same as shiplap. True shiplap is just a plain board rabbeted top and bottom for a snug fit. That is not true of clapboard. Novelty or Drop siding has a more sculptured overlap, but shiplap has none. Sometimes shiplap is laid with a slight gap between boards (revealing the rabbet) but is normally laid tight.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Scratchbuilding a car in styrene

Ralph W. Brown
 

Hi Charlie,
 
Most of the home improvement “shiplap” images I’ve seen are real more like the tongue and groove siding used on some wood freight and passenger cars.
 
In the seafaring sense, “shiplap,” is more correctly called “lapstrake” (typically pronounced lap-strack) or “clinker-built.”  The architectural equivalent would be clapboard (sometimes pronounced kla-bord).  So, what you “always thought” is correct.
 
I suspect some ignorant home improvement guru called it “shiplap,” others liked the name, and the misnomer stuck.  Oh, well . . .
 
In any event, I don’t know of any instances in which such siding was used on either freight or passenger cars.  Not to say it wasn’t, but I’ve yet to see or hear of examples of it.
 
Pax,
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 

From: Charlie Vlk
Sent: Monday, April 15, 2019 5:12 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Scratchbuilding a car in styrene
 

Randy Hees and all-

A question not directly related to Freight Cars other than being a load or possibly mislabeled car siding….

One of the cable TV home remodeling shows has an interior designer that has to use what she calls “shiplap” on every project episode…to the point it could be a drinking game of a shot for every time she mentions it.

I always thought “shiplap” was a profile that had overlapping boards like those on a traditional wooden runabout….somewhat akin to clapboard house siding.   The material she calls “shiplap” is to me a form of tongue and groove siding with a small reveal between boards (more than car siding).  

Modern usage of the term is confused as Wikipedia shows a building with “shiplap” that is a form of Novelty Siding….flat faced vertical board with a scalloped top that fits underneath the next board up.

Anyone have old millwork references that might show correct terminology?

Charlie Vlk 

Re: Scratchbuilding a car in styrene

Tony Thompson
 

Google it and you’ll find that Novelty, Dutch Drop, German Drop, Cove, and Drop siding are all the same thing.
Tony Thompson 


On Apr 15, 2019, at 6:10 PM, Jake Schaible <jjschaible@...> wrote: