Date   
Re: Details On The Road

frograbbit602
 

Very nice.
Lester Breuer

Re: Painting a real wood reefer kit.

Randy Hees
 

Scribbed wood is best first sealed with some kind of "sanding sealer".... I used shellac in the past.  Shoelace is alcohol based.  Then lightly sand or steel wool to smooth, then paint.  If sealed even acrylic will likely work.  You want to be careful not to fill in the scribbed lines with paint. Start with a light grey primer, then the yellow or orange as needed for the car...  Yellow in particular does not cover well, hence the need for the grey primer.

If per chance this is a Tiffany car, (DSP&P or C&S) don't fall into the trap of a white car, they are more likely a light green or yellow...  The white 4 wheel cabooses were not white either... 

Randy Hees

Re: Details On The Road

James Lackner
 

I have long forgotten the reason for doing it, but I recall "annealing" brass wire in the past.  This made it easier to work with, by heating it with a match or lighter, then letting it cool.

Maybe someone remembers the specifics of this method better than I am.

Jim Lackner

Re: Details On The Road

Michael Gross
 

Thanks for your comments, but this is an idea I recall seeing demonstrated by Bill Welch, George Toman, or some other fine modeler.  I used Details Associates WR 2502 .008 brass wire, and flattened it using a combination of the two pliers pictured here:  a Sears Craftsman flat needle-nose plier, and the other a 'Bead Landing' round-nosed plier I found among the bead making tools at Michael's craft store.  It's a bit tedious to work one's way along the wire, flattening it as you go, but these were the only tools I took on the road.  It would be interesting to see if the wire could could be flattened more quickly with one blow of a hammer, and I intend to give that a try when I return home.  (Be advised, the flattened brass wire is extremely delicate and breakable, and I must have tried this eight or ten times to get four workable pieces.)
 
Michael Gross
Pasadena, CA

Re: Painting a real wood reefer kit.

radiodial868
 

Having built many a wood traction model, I build the bodies first, and then apply coats of lacquer sanding sealer, removing any fuzz that gets highlighted this way, and then apply details, and then apply the Scalecoat final color.  If you don't seal the wood, the grain and wood surface (out of scale) will always show even after paint.  I use Deft brand currently. Some models can take 3-4 light coats depending on the wood.
RJ Dial
Burlingame, CA

Painting a real wood reefer kit.

Scott
 

I am building an old wood 40ft DRGW NG reefer kit.  The body is entirely wood.  The directions say to paint body first, then apply details, then touch up paint.  Makes sense to protect the wood from oils and dirt from soaking in before painting I suppose.  Besides a few wood running boards I have never painted an entire wood car.  I would assume I would need an oil based paint so it doesn't raise the grain.  I am wondering if I can use Scale coat 1 without a primer or should I spray it with Tamiya Fine then Scale coat 1?

Thanks
Scott McDonald

Re: Details On The Road

Scott
 

Wow that looks great!  Going to have to use that idea!

Scott McDonald

Re: Details On The Road

Kemal Mumcu
 

How do you flatten the wire? Hammer? Pliers?

Colin Meikle

Re: Details On The Road

Gary Ray
 

Great use of time.  Looks great.

Gary Ray

Magalia, CA

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Michael Gross
Sent: Thursday, April 25, 2019 4:03 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Details On The Road

 

Seems I get more modeling done in hotel rooms than at home.  One of the easiest projects on the road is adding small details, with a few parts and minimal tools.  The new door handles on this BLI NYC boxcar are a perfect example, with the molded handles replaced with flattened .008 brass rod.  It's a trifle "fiddley" as the flattened brass is quite delicate, but it makes for a lovely detail.  I did not use phosphor bronze as the harder wire was more resistant to being "squashed."
Michael Gross
Pasadena, CA




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Re: Details On The Road

Nelson Moyer
 

Very nice door handles, Michael.  Hope to see you in Collinsville.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Michael Gross
Sent: Thursday, April 25, 2019 6:03 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Details On The Road

 

Seems I get more modeling done in hotel rooms than at home.  One of the easiest projects on the road is adding small details, with a few parts and minimal tools.  The new door handles on this BLI NYC boxcar are a perfect example, with the molded handles replaced with flattened .008 brass rod.  It's a trifle "fiddley" as the flattened brass is quite delicate, but it makes for a lovely detail.  I did not use phosphor bronze as the harder wire was more resistant to being "squashed."
Michael Gross
Pasadena, CA

Re: Details On The Road

Tim O'Connor
 


Nice idea! What brand of .008 brass wire did you use? I didn't even know it was
possible to do that. Those look great! I can think of a number of uses for flattened
brass wire of that size. :-)

Tim O'Connor


On 4/25/2019 7:03 PM, Michael Gross wrote:
Seems I get more modeling done in hotel rooms than at home.  One of the easiest projects on the road is adding small details, with a few parts and minimal tools.  The new door handles on this BLI NYC boxcar are a perfect example, with the molded handles replaced with flattened .008 brass rod.  It's a trifle "fiddley" as the flattened brass is quite delicate, but it makes for a lovely detail.  I did not use phosphor bronze as the harder wire was more resistant to being "squashed."
Michael Gross
Pasadena, CA

Attachments:


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

Re: Details On The Road

Ralph W. Brown
 

Hi Michael,
 
Nice work!  I have to give it a try.
 
Pax,
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 

From: Michael Gross
Sent: Thursday, April 25, 2019 7:03 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Details On The Road
 
Seems I get more modeling done in hotel rooms than at home.  One of the easiest projects on the road is adding small details, with a few parts and minimal tools.  The new door handles on this BLI NYC boxcar are a perfect example, with the molded handles replaced with flattened .008 brass rod.  It's a trifle "fiddley" as the flattened brass is quite delicate, but it makes for a lovely detail.  I did not use phosphor bronze as the harder wire was more resistant to being "squashed."
Michael Gross
Pasadena, CA

Details On The Road

Michael Gross
 

Seems I get more modeling done in hotel rooms than at home.  One of the easiest projects on the road is adding small details, with a few parts and minimal tools.  The new door handles on this BLI NYC boxcar are a perfect example, with the molded handles replaced with flattened .008 brass rod.  It's a trifle "fiddley" as the flattened brass is quite delicate, but it makes for a lovely detail.  I did not use phosphor bronze as the harder wire was more resistant to being "squashed."
Michael Gross
Pasadena, CA

Re: D&RGW 65' mill gondola

Tim O'Connor
 


I think Jerry wants the "as built" lettering. There's no shortage of photos of
the cars in the post 1960 era but once repainting began all bets are off. No two
cars seem to be precisely alike.



On 4/25/2019 2:16 PM, Garth Groff wrote:
Jerry,

See RMC May 2001 for an article on these cars. These cars are also covered in Jim Eager's RIO GRANDE COLOR GUIDE TO FREIGHT AND PASSENGER EQUIPMENT.

I you don't have access to these works, please contact me off-group at mallardlodge1000_AT_gmail.com and I will put my best lens on the photos if you can tell me which lettering block to look at.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 4/25/19 10:47 AM, jerryglow2 wrote:
In the absence of the Oddballs set, I trying to do artwork for one but am missing some of the lettering on the right side. Any help?  For a better pic see  D&RGW 65ft mill gon

_._,_._,_




--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

Re: D&RGW 65' mill gondola

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Jerry,

See RMC May 2001 for an article on these cars. These cars are also covered in Jim Eager's RIO GRANDE COLOR GUIDE TO FREIGHT AND PASSENGER EQUIPMENT.

I you don't have access to these works, please contact me off-group at mallardlodge1000_AT_gmail.com and I will put my best lens on the photos if you can tell me which lettering block to look at.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 4/25/19 10:47 AM, jerryglow2 wrote:
In the absence of the Oddballs set, I trying to do artwork for one but am missing some of the lettering on the right side. Any help?  For a better pic see  D&RGW 65ft mill gon

D&RGW 65' mill gondola

jerryglow2
 

In the absence of the Oddballs set, I trying to do artwork for one but am missing some of the lettering on the right side. Any help?  For a better pic see  D&RGW 65ft mill gon

Weathering CN boxcars

Eric Hansmann
 

Ryan Mendell shares his weathering techniques on a pair of Canadian National boxcars. It's the latest post on the Resin Car Works blog.

http://blog.resincarworks.com/canadian-national-boxcar-weathering/



Eric Hansmann
RCW web guy

Re: what company owns the express reefer in the image below

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 


Hi Bob,
 
Interesting speculation - there do seem to be a number of express reefers hanging around in the image.
 
Claus Schlund
 

Does anyone know what company owns the express reefer in the image below? The car appears to have ice hatches, high speed trucks, round roof, location is described as 'View of the 7th Street Team Track by Southern Pacific Railroad' possibly in Sacramento, CA in 1925.
 
 
 
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, April 23, 2019 8:14 PM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] what company owns the express reefer in the image below

Could these express reefers be in a queue for clean-our and loading of high quality perishables?

As wild speculation on the car on the right with some stenciling visible the top line could be the beginning of CM&StP and the next line the beginning of "MILWAUKEE ROAD".

Bob Witt

Re: what company owns the express reefer in the image below

rwitt_2000
 

Could these express reefers be in a queue for clean-our and loading of high quality perishables?

As wild speculation on the car on the right with some stenciling visible the top line could be the beginning of CM&StP and the next line the beginning of "MILWAUKEE ROAD".

Bob Witt

Re: Poultry car photo

James SANDIFER
 

I have photos of live poultry cars in Clovis and Dodge City headed to the east coast. Also records of live poultry going from Texas to the east coast.



Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S8, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Edward <edb8391@...>
Date: 4/23/19 9:35 AM (GMT-06:00)
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Poultry car photo

Hauling live chickens 3,000 miles? Regardless of season or weather, I truly doubt that.
Live chickens, being easily stressed high-strung birds, do not travel well even with food and water available along the way.. 
Although from the end of a secondary branch line, those chickens surely would have met their destiny closer to home.
They may have been sent in car-load lots to Pacific northwest markets. I'm sure there was demand for them there.
At that time in the past, rail was likely faster and less stressful for live chickens than driving them in hard-riding trucks over two-lane roads of the pre-WW II highway system.

Ed Bommer