Date   

SSS speaker

Clark Propst
 

Jason Klocke lent me one of his Milwaukee Donkeys. We used it during an ops on my layout the other day. It's equipped with a Scale Sound Systems custom speaker. Besides listening to a 'state of the art' speaker I thought you might enjoy some freights cars in their natural habitat? Cars range from plastic, resin kit builds to partially scratch built or RTR.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HGh0UyOU4GU&t=28s
CW Propst


Sale HO Kits

Spen Kellogg <spninetynine@...>
 

As I age, I am narrowing my focus and selling HO kits that I can’t use and/or will never get around to building. I have for sale about 130 items. Most are HO kits (a few are RTR), both passenger and freight cars, including a few brass passenger cars and one brass passenger locomotive, and a copy of the book Pacific Fruit Express, Second Edition. I will be at the joint UP/SP convention in Ogden and will bring any items that someone has asked to see or buy. I am staying at the Hampton Inns and Suites from May 8-May 12. I also will be at the NMRA National Convention in Salt Lake City from July 7 to July 14 at the Little America Hotel and can bring items there. Items can also be purchased for shipping, although I am still determining shipping costs by Priority Mail.

 If interested, please contact me OFF LIST at spenkellogg at centurylink dot net for a PDF listing of the items. Do not use the address of this e-mail, I do not check it while traveling.

 Spen Kellogg


Re: Painting a real wood reefer kit.

Scott
 

Thank you for the replies.  It is an Alamosa car shop kit.   When I get home tonight I will post some pictures of it.  I am only into the kit for $35.00 so if the build goes into the ditch it isnt a huge loss.

Scott McDonald


Re: Painting a real wood reefer kit.

Tony Thompson
 

Ed Bommer wrote:

The main appearance snag in wood "V" shaped scribing being filled in, is that it results in a shallow dent along the otherwise too deep, too wide scribed line.

    True. I was thinking of the Northeastern type of siding with deep, rectangular grooves in it. As someone once said of that siding, "wrong on both counts."

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: Painting a real wood reefer kit.

Dave Parker
 

If the V-grooves are exaggerated in width and depth, the simple fix is to sand the surface down until they are at the desired profile.  I have a project in the works where I am doing this for a wood roof where the T&G boards are square-edge.  When finished, there will be barely visible (and variable) scribe lines.

BTW, the easiest way to deal with the fuzzy grain problem with basswood is to raise the grain several times with water, sanding with progressively finer paper between applications.  Then a single coat of sanding sealer, although I am not fully convinced it is necessary.  This is how woodworkers deal with water-based (and even alcohol-based) finishing products.

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA


Re: D&RGW 65' mill gondola

Tim O'Connor
 

Just FYI some interesting background on another group of D&RGW mill gondolas

Jim Eager wrote the following -
========================

D&RGW 30050-30099 (1st) were built by PSC 3-44 for the Defense Plant Corp, assigned/leased to the D&RGW to handle output from the Geneva Works steel mill built north of Provo by BSC for the DPC. After the War there was a disagreement between the Gov and the railroad over the L-97 UP-design 4-6-6-4s assigned to the Grande during the War. The Grande didn't like them and wasn't going to buy them. The Gov said you don't take the locos, you don't get to keep the gons either, so they went off to the ARR in '47, along with D&RGW 50000-50449,  41 ft gons built by MtVC 10-43. The locos went to the Clinchfield, also in '47.

To replace the 65-ft mill gons the Grande ordered D&RGW 30050-30099 (2nd) from PSC, blt 10-11-48, which were almost identical to the first set, both being AAR-pattern drop-end cars like the Athearn model. The Grande didn't bother replacing the 41 ft cars, instead ordering 52 ft cars D&RGW 55000-55449, built PS 1948-49.



--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Re: Details On The Road

jerryglow2
 

I used to use a piece of keystock to flatten wire in a vice (or a good smack)


Re: Painting a real wood reefer kit.

Charles Peck
 

For those who object to visible scribing, would it not be feasible 
to turn the precut wood side around?  This would present the 
blank, unscribed side to view.  If this is too plain for individual 
taste, perhaps a few scratches with course sandpaper would hint 
at the presence of individual boards.  
Chuck Peck

On Fri, Apr 26, 2019 at 10:27 AM Edward <edb8391@...> wrote:
The main appearance snag in wood "V" shaped scribing being filled in, is that it results in a shallow dent along the otherwise too deep, too wide scribed line.
Ed Bommer


Re: Painting a real wood reefer kit.

Edward
 

The main appearance snag in wood "V" shaped scribing being filled in, is that it results in a shallow dent along the otherwise too deep, too wide scribed line.
Ed Bommer


Re: Painting a real wood reefer kit.

Tony Thompson
 

Chuck Happel wrote:

In the past, I have found it useful to thin sanding sealer to avoid filling in the scribes.
But we agree that scribed siding is exaggerated, and the wood product is even more so. Wouldn't it be an ADVANTAGE if the sealer fills in the scribes? <vbg>

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Details On The Road

gtws00
 

Nicely Done Michael. Those look great.
I use a pair of Xuron Short Nose Pliers 475C to flatten my wire. Others as well but really like these. I find I get a lot of force with these. As noted here by Jim and Tony on annealing I also find in my flatting when I have also used a match or lighter to heat and flatten, that when it cools that it is often much too soft. 
Attracted are a couple photos of the 475C and flattened brass in a couple sizes. Note the 475C has no rust. The shiny parts of the pliers were picking up a reflection making them look rusty
George Toman


Re: Painting a real wood reefer kit.

Nelson Moyer
 

If you prefer using an acrylic wood sealer, look for PinePro at shops that sell pinewood derby cars and supplies. I used PinePro on two wood cars with Northeastern Lumber Co. clerestory roof shapes to seal and level the wood grain. Depending on the depth of the grain, it may take a couple of coats with sanding in between. If you’ve ever seen a nicely built pinewood derby car, you will appreciate how hard and smooth the finish on those cars can be.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Randy Hees
Sent: Thursday, April 25, 2019 10:30 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Painting a real wood reefer kit.

 

Scribbed wood is best first sealed with some kind of "sanding sealer".... I used shellac in the past.  Shoelace is alcohol based.  Then lightly sand or steel wool to smooth, then paint.  If sealed even acrylic will likely work.  You want to be careful not to fill in the scribbed lines with paint. Start with a light grey primer, then the yellow or orange as needed for the car...  Yellow in particular does not cover well, hence the need for the grey primer.

 

If per chance this is a Tiffany car, (DSP&P or C&S) don't fall into the trap of a white car, they are more likely a light green or yellow...  The white 4 wheel cabooses were not white either... 

 

Randy Hees


Re: Painting a real wood reefer kit.

Charles Happel
 

In the past, I have found it useful to thin sanding sealer to avoid filling in the scribes.

Chuck Happel

I intend to live forever, or die trying. Groucho Marx

--------------------------------------------

On Thu, 4/25/19, Randy Hees <randyhees@gmail.com> wrote:

Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Painting a real wood reefer kit.
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Date: Thursday, April 25, 2019, 11:30 PM

Scribbed wood is best
first sealed with some kind of "sanding
sealer".... I used shellac in the past.  Shoelace is
alcohol based.  Then lightly sand or steel wool to smooth,
then paint.  If sealed even acrylic will likely work.  You
want to be careful not to fill in the scribbed lines with
paint. Start with a light grey primer, then the yellow or
orange as needed for the car...  Yellow in particular does
not cover well, hence the need for the grey primer.
If per chance this is a Tiffany car, (DSP&P
or C&S) don't fall into the trap of a white car,
they are more likely a light green or yellow...  The white
4 wheel cabooses were not white either... 
Randy Hees


Re: Details On The Road

O Fenton Wells
 

Very well done Michael, sometimes being on the road is not all bad!!
Fenton

On Thu, Apr 25, 2019 at 7:03 PM Michael Gross <ActorMichaelGross@...> wrote:
Seems I get more modeling done in hotel rooms than at home.  One of the easiest projects on the road is adding small details, with a few parts and minimal tools.  The new door handles on this BLI NYC boxcar are a perfect example, with the molded handles replaced with flattened .008 brass rod.  It's a trifle "fiddley" as the flattened brass is quite delicate, but it makes for a lovely detail.  I did not use phosphor bronze as the harder wire was more resistant to being "squashed."
Michael Gross
Pasadena, CA



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Re: D&RGW 65' mill gondola

jerryglow2
 

Actually there is some symbol or logo in the 2nd panel from the right; I just downsized some lettering for what appears below it - it's not going to be legible at a scale half inch lettering.


Re: D&RGW 65' mill gondola

jerryglow2
 

Tim is correct: I wanted as built lettering The Oddballs set seems to be a mix of old and new but thanks to help my set is complete. See my completed artwork
Anyone want one? Good for the ECW kit or Athearn model or other scales. Please reply offline to:
jerryglow at comcast dot net


Re: Details On The Road

Tony Thompson
 

Michael Gross wrote:

Bear in mind that the process of hardening and annealing brass is exactly the reverse of that used with steel:  brass is hardened when it is heated and allowed to cool slowly; it is softened or annealed when heated and cooled suddenly.

     Speaking as a metallurgist, this is certainly not true of everyday or common  brass, 30 percent zinc in copper (yellow brass). Heating rate won't matter, and cooling rate will matter little either, with slower cooling making for either no change, or softer brass. 
     Of course there are lots of alloys commonly called "brass" (maybe even some that can harden on slow cooling), and to make a general comment about "steel" is even worse. From the mild steel you buy at the hardware store, to high strength technical alloys, is a galaxy of difference.
      Heating brass to red heat and setting down to cool in air is what I would do to soften it, if it's yellow brass. And I wouldn't even do that if it isn't very hard to begin with. Small diameter brass wire normally is cold finished and hard enough to benefit from annealing, but it may already be partly or completely softened in processing before you get it.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: Details On The Road

Michael Gross
 

A good thought, Jim, and in future I might experiment with annealing the brass wire before or after it is flattened.  My suspicion is that the delicacy of the flattened wire has more to do with its extremely thin cross section, and that annealing may not help much.  Bear in mind that the process of hardening and annealing brass is exactly the reverse of that used with steel:  brass is hardened when it is heated and allowed to cool slowly; it is softened or annealed when heated and cooled suddenly.

Michael Gross
Pasadena, CA


Re: Details On The Road

frograbbit602
 

Very nice.
Lester Breuer


Re: Painting a real wood reefer kit.

Randy Hees
 

Scribbed wood is best first sealed with some kind of "sanding sealer".... I used shellac in the past.  Shoelace is alcohol based.  Then lightly sand or steel wool to smooth, then paint.  If sealed even acrylic will likely work.  You want to be careful not to fill in the scribbed lines with paint. Start with a light grey primer, then the yellow or orange as needed for the car...  Yellow in particular does not cover well, hence the need for the grey primer.

If per chance this is a Tiffany car, (DSP&P or C&S) don't fall into the trap of a white car, they are more likely a light green or yellow...  The white 4 wheel cabooses were not white either... 

Randy Hees

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