Date   

Re: Details On The Road

Tim O'Connor
 


Folks

Just FYI (a reminder) - Detail Associates included injected molded door handles in its #6213 set
of tack boards and door details. They are probably not as fine as the handmade wire handles but
they do have some fine detail that can only be appreciated under a microscope. :-)

Tim O'




On 4/27/2019 11:12 AM, Dennis Storzek wrote:
On Fri, Apr 26, 2019 at 07:16 PM, WILLIAM PARDIE wrote:
In most instances the width if the handle it dictated by the molded on anchors (just the handle is carved off in the cast doors).  I'm sure that someone has an accurate dimension that you  could use..
Here was the ARA recommendation from 1922:


Dennis Storzek

Attachments:

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--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


PAINTING WOOD CARS II

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

Sorry, my reploy to the p[ainting wood cars thread exca[ped before I scpould properly edit it.  I wanted to point out that in the lower photo the wood car is the one on the right adjacent to a resin and brass car.  Below is anotgher photo of the wood car.

AgainI I apologize for the fat foingers on the keyboard.

Bill Pardie

 


Re: Painting a real wood reefer kit.

WILLIAM PARDIE
 


Above are two wood cars that I did many years ago (before the days of resin).  In the lower photo the wood car  I recall I used scalecoat on these cars without any sanding sealer except for the roofs.  I’m ssure that Andy Carlson would be critical of the deep groves, however, I feel that these cars still stand tall next to cars that have been completed in different media in rfecent times.

Bill Pardie


Re: Details On The Road

Dennis Storzek
 

On Fri, Apr 26, 2019 at 07:16 PM, WILLIAM PARDIE wrote:
In most instances the width if the handle it dictated by the molded on anchors (just the handle is carved off in the cast doors).  I'm sure that someone has an accurate dimension that you  could use..
Here was the ARA recommendation from 1922:


Dennis Storzek


Re: D&RGW 65' mill gondola

jerryglow2
 

Ed Hawkins provided me excellent info on the missing info I referred to. It's operating instructions for the retauner vakve and obviously only goes on the left B-end. It will br included on my set.


Re: Details On The Road

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

In most instances the width if the handle it dictated by the molded on anchors (just the handle is carved off in the cast doors).  I'm sure that someone has an accurate dimension that you  could use..

Bill Pardie



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: George Corral <aileron44@...>
Date: 4/26/19 2:54 PM (GMT-10:00)
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Details On The Road

On modeling a boxcar door handle in HO.  I’m curious to know. 

 

What is the actual/typical prototype dimensions of the door handle Michael and others have modeled?

 

George Corral

La Grange, KY


Re: Details On The Road

Ralph W. Brown
 

Hi George.
 
After studying a number of PRR boxcar photos from Class X29 to Class X40B, my best guess is about 10 inches between bolt of rivet head centers, and the grip, if that’s the term, appears to be about eight inches long, give or take, with a diameter roughly half again that of a grab iron or ladder rung, so maybe an inch to an inch and a quarter.  In any event, if you’re replacing cast on detail, the length will pretty much be determined by the dimensions of the detail being replaced.
 
Hope that helps.
 
Pax,
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 

From: George Corral
Sent: Friday, April 26, 2019 8:54 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Details On The Road
 

On modeling a boxcar door handle in HO.  I’m curious to know. 

 

What is the actual/typical prototype dimensions of the door handle Michael and others have modeled?

 

George Corral

La Grange, KY


Re: Details On The Road

George Corral
 

On modeling a boxcar door handle in HO.  I’m curious to know. 

 

What is the actual/typical prototype dimensions of the door handle Michael and others have modeled?

 

George Corral

La Grange, KY


Re: Painting a real wood reefer kit.

Denny Anspach
 

Like others reporting, I have been building wood (and wood and paper) railroad models since I was a child, and as we speak, I have finished three more.  Most in later years have been passenger cars, but there have been a number of freight as well.  It is a very satisfying traditional medium to work with, not the least of which because it can be challenging at times.  Some years ago on this list was a thread of disdain for wood as incapable of being a part of RPM, which for many was a rallying cry for   “We’ ll show you!”, and….we certainly made a try. Very recently I finished/rebuilt an HO 1939 (kit production date)  Comet PLUTO WATER  wood and paper model kit.  For some weeks. it honorably served amongst its resin, plastic, and metal RPM fellow layout cars before being dispatch to a better life in the hands of a fine fellow modeler far away in another state.  

Two big issues plague wood models: the reaching for a smooth surface by filling in the grain; and meticulously keeping the glue totally within the joint alone and not squeezed out.  (How many otherwise beautiful wood models have I picked over at Flea Markets that had more glue spilled outside the joints than within; and/or paint applied over raw wood without filling?)

I fill my wood traditionally with refined Model Sanding filler (commonly available at R-C stores), a filler that combines pumice with clear lacquer.  I have used this for probably 50 years or so.  I also now use Tamiya Sanding surfacer (filler) which comes in a very high quality rattle can.  The latter provides a uniform smooth monocolor  background that allows much easier detection of dirt and flaws. 

Although one can do some sanding before application of the surfacer/filler, the real sanding effectiveness comes after the filler has caused all of the grain to stiffly stand up or stand proud ready for the sandpaper (max needed 320 grit) to mow it down. I use sandpaper of all shapes and sizes to reach all the nooks and crannies, and I use several variety of brushes to vigorously clean out seams etc.  If you are filling seams and are not wanting to do so, there is something wrong, commonly over-application, or failure to clear the seams before hand.  

For glue, my general firm go-to is Krystal Klear:  there is adequate working time,  sufficient adherance strength, and easy water clean up. I do use thick ACC, Barge, and  high quality epoxies also to take advantage of the specific special qualities that each exhibit.  

  

The common issues
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento, CA 95864




Trying to connect w/Al Kresse

Bill Welch
 

Al, if you are still active here and see this please email: fgexbill(at)tampabay.rr.com

Or check Messenger for the message I sent you on Facebook

Thank you,
Bill Welch


Re: Details On The Road

Bill Welch
 

I use .010 brass wire and DO NOT anneal it. I use "Chain" nose pliers to create flat areas and regular needle to level it out the six-eight scale inches handle portion. I think the Chain nose may be same as Michael's 'Bead Landing.'  Think I will try the pliers George Toman refers to. While somewhat tedious, I find wire bending kind of meditative too.

Bill Welch


Re: Details On The Road

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

Michael does an excellent job on all of his models and this is another example of his fine and creative work.  As an alternative I have achieved a similar effect by bending the handle in .010 or .012 brass wire, inserting the legs in the door and securing it with glue from the Bach and then  filing the face of the handle flat.  This could eliminagte much of the breakage.

Bill Pardie

On Apr 25, 2019, at 1:03 PM, Michael Gross <ActorMichaelGross@...> wrote:

Seems I get more modeling done in hotel rooms than at home.  One of the easiest projects on the road is adding small details, with a few parts and minimal tools.  The new door handles on this BLI NYC boxcar are a perfect example, with the molded handles replaced with flattened .008 brass rod.  It's a trifle "fiddley" as the flattened brass is quite delicate, but it makes for a lovely detail.  I did not use phosphor bronze as the harder wire was more resistant to being "squashed."
Michael Gross
Pasadena, CA <IMG_2944.jpg>


SSS speaker

Clark Propst
 

Jason Klocke lent me one of his Milwaukee Donkeys. We used it during an ops on my layout the other day. It's equipped with a Scale Sound Systems custom speaker. Besides listening to a 'state of the art' speaker I thought you might enjoy some freights cars in their natural habitat? Cars range from plastic, resin kit builds to partially scratch built or RTR.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HGh0UyOU4GU&t=28s
CW Propst


Sale HO Kits

Spen Kellogg <spninetynine@...>
 

As I age, I am narrowing my focus and selling HO kits that I can’t use and/or will never get around to building. I have for sale about 130 items. Most are HO kits (a few are RTR), both passenger and freight cars, including a few brass passenger cars and one brass passenger locomotive, and a copy of the book Pacific Fruit Express, Second Edition. I will be at the joint UP/SP convention in Ogden and will bring any items that someone has asked to see or buy. I am staying at the Hampton Inns and Suites from May 8-May 12. I also will be at the NMRA National Convention in Salt Lake City from July 7 to July 14 at the Little America Hotel and can bring items there. Items can also be purchased for shipping, although I am still determining shipping costs by Priority Mail.

 If interested, please contact me OFF LIST at spenkellogg at centurylink dot net for a PDF listing of the items. Do not use the address of this e-mail, I do not check it while traveling.

 Spen Kellogg


Re: Painting a real wood reefer kit.

Scott
 

Thank you for the replies.  It is an Alamosa car shop kit.   When I get home tonight I will post some pictures of it.  I am only into the kit for $35.00 so if the build goes into the ditch it isnt a huge loss.

Scott McDonald


Re: Painting a real wood reefer kit.

Tony Thompson
 

Ed Bommer wrote:

The main appearance snag in wood "V" shaped scribing being filled in, is that it results in a shallow dent along the otherwise too deep, too wide scribed line.

    True. I was thinking of the Northeastern type of siding with deep, rectangular grooves in it. As someone once said of that siding, "wrong on both counts."

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: Painting a real wood reefer kit.

Dave Parker
 

If the V-grooves are exaggerated in width and depth, the simple fix is to sand the surface down until they are at the desired profile.  I have a project in the works where I am doing this for a wood roof where the T&G boards are square-edge.  When finished, there will be barely visible (and variable) scribe lines.

BTW, the easiest way to deal with the fuzzy grain problem with basswood is to raise the grain several times with water, sanding with progressively finer paper between applications.  Then a single coat of sanding sealer, although I am not fully convinced it is necessary.  This is how woodworkers deal with water-based (and even alcohol-based) finishing products.

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA


Re: D&RGW 65' mill gondola

Tim O'Connor
 

Just FYI some interesting background on another group of D&RGW mill gondolas

Jim Eager wrote the following -
========================

D&RGW 30050-30099 (1st) were built by PSC 3-44 for the Defense Plant Corp, assigned/leased to the D&RGW to handle output from the Geneva Works steel mill built north of Provo by BSC for the DPC. After the War there was a disagreement between the Gov and the railroad over the L-97 UP-design 4-6-6-4s assigned to the Grande during the War. The Grande didn't like them and wasn't going to buy them. The Gov said you don't take the locos, you don't get to keep the gons either, so they went off to the ARR in '47, along with D&RGW 50000-50449,  41 ft gons built by MtVC 10-43. The locos went to the Clinchfield, also in '47.

To replace the 65-ft mill gons the Grande ordered D&RGW 30050-30099 (2nd) from PSC, blt 10-11-48, which were almost identical to the first set, both being AAR-pattern drop-end cars like the Athearn model. The Grande didn't bother replacing the 41 ft cars, instead ordering 52 ft cars D&RGW 55000-55449, built PS 1948-49.



--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Re: Details On The Road

jerryglow2
 

I used to use a piece of keystock to flatten wire in a vice (or a good smack)


Re: Painting a real wood reefer kit.

Charles Peck
 

For those who object to visible scribing, would it not be feasible 
to turn the precut wood side around?  This would present the 
blank, unscribed side to view.  If this is too plain for individual 
taste, perhaps a few scratches with course sandpaper would hint 
at the presence of individual boards.  
Chuck Peck

On Fri, Apr 26, 2019 at 10:27 AM Edward <edb8391@...> wrote:
The main appearance snag in wood "V" shaped scribing being filled in, is that it results in a shallow dent along the otherwise too deep, too wide scribed line.
Ed Bommer