Date   

CNW gondola underside

gary laakso
 

Here is a CNW gondola tossed in a derailment:

 

https://www.lakestatesarchive.org/Ed-Wilkommen-Collection/Freight-Cars/i-ps7B49v/A 

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock


Re: Details On The Road

Robert J. Amsler, Jr.
 

Wonderful detail.

 

 

Robert J. Amsler, Jr.

514 Dover Place

Saint Louis, Missouri 63111

(314) 606-6118  (Telephone)

(314) 754-2688  (Facsimile)

MPFan1@...

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Michael Gross
Sent: Thursday, April 25, 2019 6:03 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Details On The Road

 

Seems I get more modeling done in hotel rooms than at home.  One of the easiest projects on the road is adding small details, with a few parts and minimal tools.  The new door handles on this BLI NYC boxcar are a perfect example, with the molded handles replaced with flattened .008 brass rod.  It's a trifle "fiddley" as the flattened brass is quite delicate, but it makes for a lovely detail.  I did not use phosphor bronze as the harder wire was more resistant to being "squashed."
Michael Gross
Pasadena, CA


For Sale X-Acto X611 100 Blade Package NOS

qmp211
 


I have five (5) boxes of 100 blades per box. Made in the U.S.A.
 
$20 OBO per box includes shipping.
 
PayPal only.

Please contact me off list.

Thanks,

Randy Danniel

milepost206
at
mchsi
dot
com

MILE POST 206 PUBLISHING
PO BOX 543
WEST BURLINGTON IA 52655-0543

 


Re: Details On The Road

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

:



For anyone interested above is an example of the filked down door handles.  Obviously the top handle needs a little more refinement.

Bill Pardie


Re: NYC gons

Kevin McConnell
 

Ted, the picture for F&C Kit #6600 is lettered for NYC gondola #399574.  It corresponds to NYCL lot 528-G
built in 1926 by G.A.C Co in East Chicago.  The NYC General Arrangement Drawing for this gondola is
#Q-38634 and it shows these Gondolas as having a brake wheel type of brake.  In addition Wayner's
book "New York Central Cars" shows CCC&St.L gondola #72111 (lot 508-G), another High Side Drop
Bottom 110000 lb. Gondola, covered by the same drawing with a brake wheel.  Hope this helps,
sorry for the delay in answering.

Kevin McConnell


Re: Painting a real wood reefer kit.

Tim O'Connor
 

Bill

I doubt that Andy would criticize those deep grooves - it's not in his nature to pick on such
models. :-) Most of us can appreciate older models with various deficiencies just as we can
appreciate newer efforts to reach museum quality perfection. And a well built model is
almost always appreciated!

Tim O'

On 4/27/2019 12:51 PM, WILLIAM PARDIE wrote:

Above are two wood cars that I did many years ago (before the days of resin).  In the lower photo the wood car  I recall I used scalecoat on these cars without any sanding sealer except for the roofs.  I’m ssure that Andy Carlson would be critical of the deep groves, however, I feel that these cars still stand tall next to cars that have been completed in different media in rfecent times.

Bill Pardie

Attachments:



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Details On The Road - Door Handles

Michael Gross
 

One of the great things about this forum is the wealth of knowledge from my fellows:  Tony Thompson's advice on metallurgy; George Toman's note concerning pliers; Bill Welch's use of larger diameter wire; Bill Pardie's suggestion to file rather than pinch the handle; Dennis Storzek's 1922 ARA drawing of door handle dimensions.  I may incorporate all of these ideas into my next attempt at door handles.

And, as Bill Pardie suggested, in the case of a molded plastic model like the BLI NYC steel box car, the handle size was, in fact, determined by the molded door anchors.

Thanks for all the advice!
Michael Gross
On The Road - Lake Tahoe, NV


Re: Details On The Road

Ralph W. Brown
 

Hi Dennis,
 
Thanks for the drawings.  Looks like my guestimates were pretty close.
 
Pax,
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 

From: Dennis Storzek
Sent: Saturday, April 27, 2019 11:12 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Details On The Road
 
On Fri, Apr 26, 2019 at 07:16 PM, WILLIAM PARDIE wrote:
In most instances the width if the handle it dictated by the molded on anchors (just the handle is carved off in the cast doors).  I'm sure that someone has an accurate dimension that you  could use..
Here was the ARA recommendation from 1922:


Dennis Storzek


Re: Details On The Road

Tim O'Connor
 


Folks

Just FYI (a reminder) - Detail Associates included injected molded door handles in its #6213 set
of tack boards and door details. They are probably not as fine as the handmade wire handles but
they do have some fine detail that can only be appreciated under a microscope. :-)

Tim O'




On 4/27/2019 11:12 AM, Dennis Storzek wrote:
On Fri, Apr 26, 2019 at 07:16 PM, WILLIAM PARDIE wrote:
In most instances the width if the handle it dictated by the molded on anchors (just the handle is carved off in the cast doors).  I'm sure that someone has an accurate dimension that you  could use..
Here was the ARA recommendation from 1922:


Dennis Storzek

Attachments:

_._,_._,_

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


PAINTING WOOD CARS II

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

Sorry, my reploy to the p[ainting wood cars thread exca[ped before I scpould properly edit it.  I wanted to point out that in the lower photo the wood car is the one on the right adjacent to a resin and brass car.  Below is anotgher photo of the wood car.

AgainI I apologize for the fat foingers on the keyboard.

Bill Pardie

 


Re: Painting a real wood reefer kit.

WILLIAM PARDIE
 


Above are two wood cars that I did many years ago (before the days of resin).  In the lower photo the wood car  I recall I used scalecoat on these cars without any sanding sealer except for the roofs.  I’m ssure that Andy Carlson would be critical of the deep groves, however, I feel that these cars still stand tall next to cars that have been completed in different media in rfecent times.

Bill Pardie


Re: Details On The Road

Dennis Storzek
 

On Fri, Apr 26, 2019 at 07:16 PM, WILLIAM PARDIE wrote:
In most instances the width if the handle it dictated by the molded on anchors (just the handle is carved off in the cast doors).  I'm sure that someone has an accurate dimension that you  could use..
Here was the ARA recommendation from 1922:


Dennis Storzek


Re: D&RGW 65' mill gondola

jerryglow2
 

Ed Hawkins provided me excellent info on the missing info I referred to. It's operating instructions for the retauner vakve and obviously only goes on the left B-end. It will br included on my set.


Re: Details On The Road

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

In most instances the width if the handle it dictated by the molded on anchors (just the handle is carved off in the cast doors).  I'm sure that someone has an accurate dimension that you  could use..

Bill Pardie



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: George Corral <aileron44@...>
Date: 4/26/19 2:54 PM (GMT-10:00)
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Details On The Road

On modeling a boxcar door handle in HO.  I’m curious to know. 

 

What is the actual/typical prototype dimensions of the door handle Michael and others have modeled?

 

George Corral

La Grange, KY


Re: Details On The Road

Ralph W. Brown
 

Hi George.
 
After studying a number of PRR boxcar photos from Class X29 to Class X40B, my best guess is about 10 inches between bolt of rivet head centers, and the grip, if that’s the term, appears to be about eight inches long, give or take, with a diameter roughly half again that of a grab iron or ladder rung, so maybe an inch to an inch and a quarter.  In any event, if you’re replacing cast on detail, the length will pretty much be determined by the dimensions of the detail being replaced.
 
Hope that helps.
 
Pax,
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 

From: George Corral
Sent: Friday, April 26, 2019 8:54 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Details On The Road
 

On modeling a boxcar door handle in HO.  I’m curious to know. 

 

What is the actual/typical prototype dimensions of the door handle Michael and others have modeled?

 

George Corral

La Grange, KY


Re: Details On The Road

George Corral
 

On modeling a boxcar door handle in HO.  I’m curious to know. 

 

What is the actual/typical prototype dimensions of the door handle Michael and others have modeled?

 

George Corral

La Grange, KY


Re: Painting a real wood reefer kit.

Denny Anspach
 

Like others reporting, I have been building wood (and wood and paper) railroad models since I was a child, and as we speak, I have finished three more.  Most in later years have been passenger cars, but there have been a number of freight as well.  It is a very satisfying traditional medium to work with, not the least of which because it can be challenging at times.  Some years ago on this list was a thread of disdain for wood as incapable of being a part of RPM, which for many was a rallying cry for   “We’ ll show you!”, and….we certainly made a try. Very recently I finished/rebuilt an HO 1939 (kit production date)  Comet PLUTO WATER  wood and paper model kit.  For some weeks. it honorably served amongst its resin, plastic, and metal RPM fellow layout cars before being dispatch to a better life in the hands of a fine fellow modeler far away in another state.  

Two big issues plague wood models: the reaching for a smooth surface by filling in the grain; and meticulously keeping the glue totally within the joint alone and not squeezed out.  (How many otherwise beautiful wood models have I picked over at Flea Markets that had more glue spilled outside the joints than within; and/or paint applied over raw wood without filling?)

I fill my wood traditionally with refined Model Sanding filler (commonly available at R-C stores), a filler that combines pumice with clear lacquer.  I have used this for probably 50 years or so.  I also now use Tamiya Sanding surfacer (filler) which comes in a very high quality rattle can.  The latter provides a uniform smooth monocolor  background that allows much easier detection of dirt and flaws. 

Although one can do some sanding before application of the surfacer/filler, the real sanding effectiveness comes after the filler has caused all of the grain to stiffly stand up or stand proud ready for the sandpaper (max needed 320 grit) to mow it down. I use sandpaper of all shapes and sizes to reach all the nooks and crannies, and I use several variety of brushes to vigorously clean out seams etc.  If you are filling seams and are not wanting to do so, there is something wrong, commonly over-application, or failure to clear the seams before hand.  

For glue, my general firm go-to is Krystal Klear:  there is adequate working time,  sufficient adherance strength, and easy water clean up. I do use thick ACC, Barge, and  high quality epoxies also to take advantage of the specific special qualities that each exhibit.  

  

The common issues
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento, CA 95864




Trying to connect w/Al Kresse

Bill Welch
 

Al, if you are still active here and see this please email: fgexbill(at)tampabay.rr.com

Or check Messenger for the message I sent you on Facebook

Thank you,
Bill Welch


Re: Details On The Road

Bill Welch
 

I use .010 brass wire and DO NOT anneal it. I use "Chain" nose pliers to create flat areas and regular needle to level it out the six-eight scale inches handle portion. I think the Chain nose may be same as Michael's 'Bead Landing.'  Think I will try the pliers George Toman refers to. While somewhat tedious, I find wire bending kind of meditative too.

Bill Welch


Re: Details On The Road

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

Michael does an excellent job on all of his models and this is another example of his fine and creative work.  As an alternative I have achieved a similar effect by bending the handle in .010 or .012 brass wire, inserting the legs in the door and securing it with glue from the Bach and then  filing the face of the handle flat.  This could eliminagte much of the breakage.

Bill Pardie

On Apr 25, 2019, at 1:03 PM, Michael Gross <ActorMichaelGross@...> wrote:

Seems I get more modeling done in hotel rooms than at home.  One of the easiest projects on the road is adding small details, with a few parts and minimal tools.  The new door handles on this BLI NYC boxcar are a perfect example, with the molded handles replaced with flattened .008 brass rod.  It's a trifle "fiddley" as the flattened brass is quite delicate, but it makes for a lovely detail.  I did not use phosphor bronze as the harder wire was more resistant to being "squashed."
Michael Gross
Pasadena, CA <IMG_2944.jpg>